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Any tips for my first true road bike?

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Any tips for my first true road bike?

Old 06-04-19, 07:11 AM
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Jrasero
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Any tips for my first true road bike?

My last three bikes have been flat bar bikes: 2014 Giant Escape RX Composite, 2016 Kestrel RT-1000 Flat Bar, and a 2016 Scott Scale 730 Hardtail.

I decided it was time to get rid of my hardtail because I spent the entire time on the road and wanted to try out a proper drop bar road bike. I got a good deal on a leftover 2017 Scott Addict 20 Disc and I have just done 50 miles on it and need to bring it in to have the derailleur tuned but other than that mechanically it has been great

Any advice for a first time roadie?

https://imgur.com/gallery/8vpYqnU

What I somewhat overlooked was the fact that the 2017 model was marketed as race geometry so the bike especially in the drops has me insanely low at least for me, so my back is actually a tad sore
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Old 06-04-19, 07:19 AM
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How tall are you? By my judgement in the picture, the bike looks to be about 54cm. You can get a riser type or adjustable stem to bring the bars up. Also check your saddle position, height, forward/backward and angle.It takes some time and miles to get it all how you are most comfortable.
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Old 06-04-19, 08:40 AM
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Fit is much more important on a drop-bar bike than a flat-bar bike (IMO) and even more so for an aggressive frame.

As @delbiker1 notes, you can adjust bar height (seat-bar drop) with spacers and stem. You can also try different bars---drop bars come with varying drop and reach. As he notes, it takes time and miles ... and also, as your body develops the specific muscles, your "correct" fit will change ... and change again during the off-season ...

Ge the seat right first--height and fore-and-aft position relative to the pedals. Then start experimenting with the bars. My high-tech solution is to park my bike next to the washer-dryer, with one foot on the pedal and the other on a small footstool, so I can balance and still approximate sitting and riding. Then I lean forward however much is comfortable, swing my arms down so my elbows are still a little bent, and that is about where I want the hood (I normally ride on or just behind the hoods.) I get whatever stem/spacer/bar combo is going to put the bar where I need it.
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Old 06-04-19, 09:02 AM
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Jrasero
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Originally Posted by delbiker1 View Post
How tall are you? By my judgement in the picture, the bike looks to be about 54cm. You can get a riser type or adjustable stem to bring the bars up. Also check your saddle position, height, forward/backward and angle.It takes some time and miles to get it all how you are most comfortable.
I am 5'5", Bike is a 49cm, the day I took that picture the seat was too high and that might explain the back pain

Thanks for the advise I probably will look into a riser stem to give a slightly more up right position

Last edited by Jrasero; 06-04-19 at 09:15 AM.
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Old 06-04-19, 09:19 AM
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Also any advice on a comfortable saddle the Syncros one is killing me lol. I can get a Selle Italia C2 Gel Flow Saddle for half off would that be any good?
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Old 06-04-19, 09:19 AM
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strobes front & rear
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Old 06-04-19, 09:49 AM
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Saddles are one of the most difficult things to fine comfort in. What works for me will not work for others. It is very size, body shape, bike fit, material, type of riding, position, etc., specific. See if one of your local shops has test saddles for you to try for a couple of rides. For me, I need narrow in the transition area, relatively flat on top and not too much padding. Most will agree that any saddle takes some time and miles to actual find if it is comfortable for you. I have saddles that I did not like and stopped riding them, only to give them another try later, and find that are comfortable if I give them a fair try. Others have been comfortable from the first use, to finding they are really bad for longer rides. The saddle is one of the most important aspects of riding a bike, and one of the hardest to get right. I have a couple of saddles that I paid a good bit for that are now just taking up space. I have one saddle that I bought new for $14 and is very comfortable. I use that one on my commuter, errands and beater bike.
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Old 06-04-19, 09:58 AM
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Originally Posted by delbiker1 View Post
Saddles are one of the most difficult things to fine comfort in. What works for me will not work for others. It is very size, body shape, bike fit, material, type of riding, position, etc., specific. See if one of your local shops has test saddles for you to try for a couple of rides. For me, I need narrow in the transition area, relatively flat on top and not too much padding. Most will agree that any saddle takes some time and miles to actual find if it is comfortable for you. I have saddles that I did not like and stopped riding them, only to give them another try later, and find that are comfortable if I give them a fair try. Others have been comfortable from the first use, to finding they are really bad for longer rides. The saddle is one of the most important aspects of riding a bike, and one of the hardest to get right. I have a couple of saddles that I paid a good bit for that are now just taking up space. I have one saddle that I bought new for $14 and is very comfortable. I use that one on my commuter, errands and beater bike.
lol I am getting the common trial and error advice. I can see why cycling even if not serious can be very expensive. I might get the Selle Italia since it's on Back Country and they have free 30 day returns...

You are probably right since a lot of biking is subjective even if there are some optimal performance suggestions
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Old 06-04-19, 09:58 AM
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Get the fit right first...

Originally Posted by Jrasero View Post
Also any advice on a comfortable saddle the Syncros one is killing me lol. I can get a Selle Italia C2 Gel Flow Saddle for half off would that be any good?
Not good. My suggestion would be to get the fit correct on the bike first. Saddle height, saddle fore/aft positioning relative to the bottom bracket, and saddle pitch all contribute to getting your weight balanced correctly on the bike. Then move the handlebars to suit your reach, flexibility, core strength, and power level.

Only then can you begin to evaluate whether or not the saddle is any good for you. The one that you have might be fine, with all of the other variables sorted out.

Get the bike to fit properly first. Spend your time, brainpower, and money there.
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Old 06-04-19, 10:03 AM
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Just to add that these ^ adjustments rarely are done in one day. Small adjustments will make substantial changes in your comfort and performance on the bike. If you have access to a bike trainer (that you can borrow for a few weeks) that'd be a good way to make an adjustment and compare your riding result.

Make measurements and keep detailed notes. Read and re-read what your observations are as you make adjustments. Subjective is one aspect, yes. Random is what you want to avoid.
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Old 06-04-19, 10:18 AM
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I am not going to give you untruths as advice. I can only relay to you my own experience. If you get only humor out of it, that is your perception and has nothing to do with me.
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Old 06-04-19, 10:36 PM
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if you already did 50 miles on it why do you need advice , and what advice do you need , a trek fanboy would tell you to throw that POS in the trash can and get a emonda , thats a real roadies , bike , this post is way to open for silliness !!!!!

the bike is what you choose ride it and enjoy , what advice could a person give you , up wear your helmet ( crash and land on your hips and elbows every time ) , put a reflective strip on your back and shoes , ect ect ect !!!!!!!
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Old 06-05-19, 11:34 AM
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Lots of good advice here.
All I would add is don’t feel like you have to spend an excessive(or any)amount of time in the drops until you rack up some miles and are somewhat dialed in on fit.
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Old 06-05-19, 02:28 PM
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Jrasero
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Originally Posted by Teamprovicycle View Post
if you already did 50 miles on it why do you need advice , and what advice do you need , a trek fanboy would tell you to throw that POS in the trash can and get a emonda , thats a real roadies , bike , this post is way to open for silliness !!!!!

the bike is what you choose ride it and enjoy , what advice could a person give you , up wear your helmet ( crash and land on your hips and elbows every time ) , put a reflective strip on your back and shoes , ect ect ect !!!!!!!
lol nah all the advice on here has been good. There defiantly is a difference between a race oriented drop bar bike and flat bar road bike, hardtail, and hybrid which I used to own. I get what your saying, just go out and ride and a lot of things will just come over time.
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Old 06-05-19, 02:30 PM
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Spend time at your favorite bike shop to get the right size and fit..
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Old 06-05-19, 03:00 PM
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I was very nervous about switching from a hybrid to a drop-bar road bike. I'm actually loving my new bike and it has seemed pretty comfortable from day 1. My butt has adjusted nicely to the saddle which looked extremely uncomfortable to me at first. I haven't ridden more than 40 miles at a time on her yet, but I felt no pain after that ride. Next up - 50 miles.

The bike store gave me a credit toward a bike fit with the purchase of my bike and and I have a credit from the old bike that they sold for me. I'm just not sure I need to adjust anything.
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Old 06-06-19, 02:22 PM
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I have the saddle you mentioned and I find it comfortable. However, I do not give you permission to use my arse for your bike rides, and your own arse might be shaped differently, so this comment is pointless and should be ignored.
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