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Mixing a titanium frame with alloy or carbon parts

Old 11-27-20, 10:22 PM
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azza_333
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Mixing a titanium frame with alloy or carbon parts

I have been doing some reading and it sounds like there is a risk of corrosion using alloy or carbon parts with a titanium frame. Is this true? and what can be done to avoided it, would have to put an alloy seat post or stem on a titanium frame, and have it go bad years later.
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Old 11-27-20, 10:54 PM
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unterhausen
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grease or carbon assembly paste. Take it apart occasionally and reapply. It's not as bad as a steel frame and aluminum parts, and people live with that no problem.
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Old 11-27-20, 11:12 PM
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Originally Posted by unterhausen View Post
grease or carbon assembly paste. Take it apart occasionally and reapply. It's not as bad as a steel frame and aluminum parts, and people live with that no problem.
Wow I was not aware steel and aluminum had the same issue. I currently have a steel frame with alloy stem and seatpost.
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Old 11-28-20, 12:14 AM
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I have two to bikes. No CF parts. I use aluminum and steel on it just like I would on a steel bike. Use plenty of marine grease for seaposts and the threads, but I do that on all my bikes. The bikes are now12 and 7 years old and have been ridden in a lot of rain. Haven't seen a corrosion issue yet.
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Old 11-28-20, 12:18 AM
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Originally Posted by azza_333 View Post
Wow I was not aware steel and aluminum had the same issue. I currently have a steel frame with alloy stem and seatpost.
We used Phil Wood or equivalent grease for those part since dark ages. Biggest danger - the post or quill getting stuck. Don't worry, they parts will not go away from corrosion, They just might not leave when you want them to.
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Old 11-28-20, 05:31 AM
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Have had two titanium frames over the past 10 years and loved them both. One is still in service and equipped with alloy parts. Seat posts are coated with white lithium grease before inserted into the seat tube. BB cups and headset cups the same. Yeah, not the fancy grease, just good ol' lithium, the do all grease. lol. Was a huge proponent of Phil, and it is what I use for bearing surfaces, but for the simple task of preventing corrosion, lithium grease does the job. Yet to see any corrosion on the aluminum or steel bits.
From a shop mechanic point of view, we routinely get old 70's era Schwinn bikes in for work that are rusted like crazy on the outside, but the stems and posts pop right out because they were coated in white lithium grease when originally assembled.
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Old 11-28-20, 06:47 AM
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My go-to grease for dissimilar-metal joints is Tef-Gel: https://www.tefgel.com/contain.php?param=tefgel_infor It is specifically formulated to inhibit electrolytic corrosion in marine environments
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Old 11-28-20, 06:49 AM
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My Teledyne Titan CP Ti frame built in '76 hung in the basement fully assembled from ~'79 to '00 when I took it down and rebuilt
it with modern drive train. The aluminum seat post slid right out after 23 yrs in situ as did the '70s era stem.
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Old 11-28-20, 08:02 AM
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Originally Posted by azza_333 View Post
I currently have a steel frame with alloy stem and seatpost.
As said grease, assembly paste, or for the best, copper based anti-sieze paste (although very messy). I'm in mostly dry Arizona, so never bother to re-apply on my Ti frames but on the lovely coast of Perth I would periodically check and reapply. Don't forget other possible spots, BB threads, water bottle bolts, etc.
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Old 11-28-20, 02:07 PM
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Having 3 titanium bikes I can say really all you need is anti seize paste and a little check up with some regularity just like you would with any seatpost on any bike. Nothing exceptionally special and you can use the anti seize for steel or aluminum as well. Basically you are greasing metal on metal components but with a slightly different compound however you can use just standard grease but make sure to check it more frequently.

This is what I use but any anti seize or copper paste will work:
https://www.parktool.com/product/ant...compound-asc-1
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Old 11-28-20, 04:02 PM
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Then there's titanium frame with a titanium post. No galvanic reaction there, but titanium is said to be able to "cold weld" itself to itself. I've used a copper-based grease and haven't had any problems in almost 20 years.
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Old 11-28-20, 05:57 PM
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Originally Posted by veganbikes View Post
Having 3 titanium bikes I can say really all you need is anti seize paste and a little check up with some regularity just like you would with any seatpost on any bike. Nothing exceptionally special and you can use the anti seize for steel or aluminum as well. Basically you are greasing metal on metal components but with a slightly different compound however you can use just standard grease but make sure to check it more frequently.

This is what I use but any anti seize or copper paste will work:
https://www.parktool.com/product/ant...compound-asc-1
I also have three Ti bikes, one is 24 years old and the other two are 14 years old. I've never had any problems with aluminum seatposts, stems, or other items or steel bb cups, bolts, etc. with them. I've always used Phil grease on the seatposts and threaded fittings and nothing has ever seized. Any other grease would be just as good. I have used anti-seize on bottom bracket cups in the past but it's not essential.
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Old 11-28-20, 07:28 PM
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I would rather be safe than sorry. The examples above are the feel good stories, but walk into any bike shop and ask the mechanics about stuck seat posts and stems, it happens. It happened to me. Now every spring when I do my bike clean up, I re-grease the stem and seat posts.
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Old 11-28-20, 08:12 PM
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Originally Posted by blakcloud View Post
I would rather be safe than sorry. The examples above are the feel good stories, but walk into any bike shop and ask the mechanics about stuck seat posts and stems, it happens. It happened to me. Now every spring when I do my bike clean up, I re-grease the stem and seat posts.
Ofd course neglect can cause stuck seatposts, stems, bolts, bottom bracket cups, etc. in any frame made from any material. Periodic removal, cleaning and greasing is required for all types.

However, the OP was asking specifically about Ti frames and if their tendency to suffer stuck seatposts, etc. is worse than other frame materials. Experience tells us they are no more a problem than any other type of frame.
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Old 11-28-20, 09:28 PM
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Originally Posted by sweeks View Post
Then there's titanium frame with a titanium post. No galvanic reaction there, but titanium is said to be able to "cold weld" itself to itself. I've used a copper-based grease and haven't had any problems in almost 20 years.
Copper based grease is the best solution for never worrying. Back in 98 or so the local Dicks sporting goods had a Ti mongoose road bike with full ultegra that was clearanced for nothing since the ti seatpost wouldn't move. Wasn't greased on assembly and bonded to the frame.

Aluminum is less so likely to bond but there is a reason ti spokes ship with a little copper grease for use with aluminum nipples. Haven't heard of steel being an issue but as with anything, just grease it.
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Old 11-29-20, 07:57 AM
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While personal experience is valuable the particular circumstances vary widely, most significantly moisture. After 40 years in metallurgical plants, in similar circumstances I can tell you the galvanic corrosion potential, which is what causes these issues, is much higher with Ti and Al than carbon steels and Al. A higher amount of electrolytes (salt) in the moisture in a sea breeze will accelerate the corrosion. As you all know from experience keeping the dissimilar metals apart with a coating is the key.
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