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The Hardest Part For Me Is Getting Out The Garage Door

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The Hardest Part For Me Is Getting Out The Garage Door

Old 12-29-19, 10:47 PM
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GAtkins
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The Hardest Part For Me Is Getting Out The Garage Door

I'm a clyde. 56yoa, 280lbs, down from 340lbs in July. Today it was approx. 40F with a 14mph wind. I did 32 miles today. I've done 1,250 miles since mid July, after having been off the bike for 10 years.

All these stats are weak compared to the vast majority of the riders on this board, but, hey, they're mine. They are what they are. But that's not the point of this thread anyway.

I said all that to say this; particularly during the winter months, the most difficult part of any ride is just getting on the bike and out the door. I can't ride during the week because it gets dark too early. Probably half the weekends it's rained since the time changed. Plus the holidays, it's just hard to find the time to ride.

Again, the hardest part is just getting out the door, even on nights and weekends during the summer months. Once I'm on the bike and clipped in I just go and my motivation is there, no problem. Again, just getting over that minor hump of just getting out the door.

Motivation pre-ride is there. Motivation during the ride is there. It's just that 15 minutes of getting "jocked up" and out the door that's really tough. Anyone else have a similar difficulty where a lack of motivation occupies just a thin slice of time? Some people ask me sometimes, "what's the hardest part of riding 25 miles"? I tell them, it's the first 25 miles.

Just curious, discuss. Happy New Year!

Glenn
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Old 12-29-19, 10:56 PM
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Think about getting a trainer and riding inside. That way you can ride after work.

great job on the weight loss!
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Old 12-29-19, 11:22 PM
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Originally Posted by Bmach View Post
Think about getting a trainer and riding inside. That way you can ride after work.

great job on the weight loss!
Thanks for the kind comment, much appreciated. Actually I have been thinking about getting a trainer and Zwift or something similar. I've got the room in the garage for it and it would be an ideal setup. I'm really a "gear head" and would want the latest and greatest stuff on the market. Being a gear-head is one of only a few of my vices.

My possible current plan would be to have a dedicated bike for the trainer. Currently I'm on a size 61 2009 Specialized Allez Comp, with a 105 group. I'm thinking about dedicating that bike to the trainer and getting a Trek Domane SLR in the spring. I'm going to Retul in Boulder in three weeks to get everything dialed in before I make a change. I'm looking forward to the comprehensive fit.

Do you have a trainer yourself? Do you like it? Would you mind sharing your setup?

Thanks again.

Glenn
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Old 12-30-19, 01:24 AM
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I would suggest getting some lights and riding at night. I'm guessing about 1/4 of my mileage was at night over the last couple of years.

I was hesitant at first but wow, so nice and exhilarating! Peaceful, quiet and because it is night, you can see just about every vehicle and thing coming toward you. I rode from my front door and was actually excited about it. If I could, I would probably do longer 40 milers in the dark but an hour is usually about my allowance on weeknights. But is sure is fun!

I got a couple of USB charging lights and love them. I use 2 since I have them and they work fine. The most I have to worry about here is about 45 degrees on night rides though. But some tights, under layer, jersey and a windbreaker are good for me, even in the light rain of night.

I started riding more at night being limited on weekends last couple of years and I am not sorry I started riding at night.







Every once in a while I will ride in the rain at night because it is so AWESOME!

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Old 12-30-19, 01:26 AM
  #5  
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Congrats on the weight loss. I was 378 at my heaviest, hit 239 today.

I've spent more time on exercise bikes and my trainer than outdoors, but at least I'm moving.

Whole heartedly agree, just getting out the door is tough. Even getting on the trainer some days is tough.

My set up is a Kurt Kinetic fluid trainer, with the iNride sensor. I call it Half Smart, at it gives power output needed for Zwift and Rouvy, but doesn't control resistance. Maybe next year. I do have a bike dedicated to the trainer. I crashed on this bike years ago, so it's punishment is to be stuck indoors... In reality, it has seen more "miles" than any other of my bikes... Since it is always on the trainer, I don't have to change anything to ride, just get on and go. I also use a Heart Rate Monitor and speed and cadence sensors. My laptop has bluetooth, I added an ANT+ dongle and uSB extension cable. Then HDMI cable to a TV... And don't forget a fan, towels, and water. I also use my 8" tablet for the Zwift Companion app. But that isn't essential.

I am looking forward to decent days, so I can get outside as much as I can on the weekends. Good luck!
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Old 12-30-19, 10:09 AM
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congrats on the progress!! I will second Zwift. I use it all winter long and its great! Keeps me "going"
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Old 12-31-19, 09:36 AM
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I commute to work. So getting out of the door is a must for me. But I am also looking forward to the ride. The sunrises can sometimes be beautiful in the morning. And sometimes there is wildlife.
And I agree with the lights. Get some good lights. I have a hub dynamo setup and battery lights because I commute in the dark. At least my morning commutes are mostly in the dark and some of the trails are in the pitch black. Fortunately we don't have snow here and I am riding all year long. I personally hate indoor trainers. I am an outdoors person and rather be outside in the cold or rain on a real bike than on an indoor trainer and staring at a TV.
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Old 12-31-19, 09:44 AM
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yeah getting out the door is a challenge. for me, it's not necessarily motivation, per se, but rather, getting to a point where I am out of the door. I get up & know I want to ride that day, but there's a ton of stuff standing in my way. I just take it one step at a time & don't think about it too much. I take care of my chores & errands, then begin the bike prep process. after a while, there's just nothing left to do except ride the bike. here's wishing us both luck getting out the door!
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Old 12-31-19, 10:20 AM
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I would suggest finding a body or a club to ride with. It is much easier to get out of the door to commit to the ride if someone is waiting for you.
I also like getting new gear and trying it out during cold or/and dark rides. It could be a new light or winter boots or winter jersey,,,etc.
I like experimenting on different layers depending on the temperature and effort
Another option to get more motivation would be to join Strava and one the challengers it offers. For instance ride so many miles or elevation in a given month, ride more than a cyclist that you know or climb more using on line tool like Strava to compare the efforts.
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Old 12-31-19, 03:37 PM
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Originally Posted by GAtkins View Post
Thanks for the kind comment, much appreciated. Actually I have been thinking about getting a trainer and Zwift or something similar. I've got the room in the garage for it and it would be an ideal setup. I'm really a "gear head" and would want the latest and greatest stuff on the market. Being a gear-head is one of only a few of my vices.

My possible current plan would be to have a dedicated bike for the trainer. Currently I'm on a size 61 2009 Specialized Allez Comp, with a 105 group. I'm thinking about dedicating that bike to the trainer and getting a Trek Domane SLR in the spring. I'm going to Retul in Boulder in three weeks to get everything dialed in before I make a change. I'm looking forward to the comprehensive fit.

Do you have a trainer yourself? Do you like it? Would you mind sharing your setup?
I have one of the older kickrs. I rebuilt one of my old bikes for trainer duty so it lives on the trainer. I run zwift on my home computer and have a long HDMI cable going to a 50" TV. It's a HUGE benefit to just throw some clothes on and ride, regardless of conditions outside. I got my wife a kickr core and HER old bike is on it. She uses her iPad, works fine.

As for outdoor riding, usually the tipping point is getting dressed. Once I have the kit on, I'm 99.9% going for a ride. Just got to get the clothes on.
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Old 12-31-19, 08:06 PM
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Many thanks for the great ideas and support. Also, congrats to you all making progress on the weight issue. I've fought that demon for a long time.

Many of these ideas I've given some thought to, more or less. Zwift and a trainer are definitely in the future, I just don't know when - that cost versus wanting a new bike in the spring, ugh!. TheDudeIsHere thanks for the great pics. The one thing that I've yet to look at seriously is the night riding idea. My immediate neighborhood looks kinda like I think yours does - some street lights here and there, etc.

My normal day ride is through some moderate traffic, but then out on two lane country roads with not much traffic and no shoulder - rolling grades of 4-6% and some short ones up around 10% percent or so in places. The other thing in that area that would concern me would be critters, opossum, raccoon, skunk, etc. at night. But I could do 10 or 15 miles just going around my neighborhood several times. I'll look into the night riding more seriously. In fact, I've got some "be seen" blinkies already for the daytime - I may just take a slow ride around the neighborhood one night to see what it's like. Of course no serious riding without proper lights.

Andrey on the club issue. Years ago there was a pretty active group around here, but lately I just see small groups, 4 to 10 riders or so, but a few singles and doubles here and there. There used to be some well-sponsored crits and some stage races as will, both with good corporate support. I didn't/don't race though. In any event, I'd get spit out the back on those right now anyway, again Ugh! Re Strava, I've been on there a couple of months or so and my Garmin will upload to there and Garmin Connect as you know. I also use Cyclemeter - I love that app. I see the badges come up now and again for PRs on some of the segments around here but I need to dig deeper into it. I've pretty much got clothes good to down around 30f or so.

rumrunn6 I know exactly how you feel. Once I'm jocked up I'm gone. Back in the summer I'd start just after daybreak and do chores and errands after. Now I'll usually wait until it's around 35f or so, which sometimes makes it a little later in the day. Thing is, as you all know, the wind tends to increase as the day goes on, so there is that. Wind doesn't bother me much until the times it comes from all four directions and I can't get away from it. It doesn't seem to affect my speed, etc., much, but it just beats the daylights out of you if you can't get out of it every now and then. The kids are grown so there's a lot less time-critical errands, soccer, football, baseball, etc. now, which is both good and bad in a way. Many times I'll sort of get my kit in place the night before like you. Thanks for the kind wishes.

zjrog Yeah, I've got all the doodads and I chuckled at your description of a "half-smart" trainer.

Many thanks again for the ideas. Happy New Year to everyone!

Glenn
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Old 12-31-19, 11:23 PM
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Originally Posted by GAtkins View Post
Many thanks for the great ideas and support. Also, congrats to you all making progress on the weight issue. I've fought that demon for a long time.

Many of these ideas I've given some thought to, more or less. Zwift and a trainer are definitely in the future, I just don't know when - that cost versus wanting a new bike in the spring, ugh!. TheDudeIsHere thanks for the great pics. The one thing that I've yet to look at seriously is the night riding idea. My immediate neighborhood looks kinda like I think yours does - some street lights here and there, etc.

My normal day ride is through some moderate traffic, but then out on two lane country roads with not much traffic and no shoulder - rolling grades of 4-6% and some short ones up around 10% percent or so in places. The other thing in that area that would concern me would be critters, opossum, raccoon, skunk, etc. at night. But I could do 10 or 15 miles just going around my neighborhood several times. I'll look into the night riding more seriously. In fact, I've got some "be seen" blinkies already for the daytime - I may just take a slow ride around the neighborhood one night to see what it's like. Of course no serious riding without proper lights.
Seriously give it some thought, it's wonderful. I live in the foothills of the local mountain range so from my doorstep, it is a steady 4% grade for 3 miles with a 5,7, and 11% percent kicker at the top. I do loops to get 10 to 12 miles on weeknights.

I do climb up on a side street with plenty of 4 way stop sign intersections. I think that stops traffic from hitting top end speeds. Safer for me and drivers are always courteous when I obey the laws. I ride during the daylight and night hours.

This is the profile for my midweek rides. Low miles with a little climbing. I save longer rides for the weekends.



The image I posted earlier is the same road and spot of this daylight pic. This is a high speed descent for traffic. I am descending at about 30 mph at night with my lights. The pics don't show actually how much my lights light up the road or how much I can really see. But this is the downhill part. Though usual traffic is moderate, I rarely get passed by cars, even at night.




BUT!!!! I do scope out the local roads before I ride. On the way home from work, I will look for construction, debris, heavy leaves etc. Of course ascending at 10 mph, I don't worry much, easy to see obstacles. the descent, I always make sure I am familiar with the road and conditions.

But riding at night with lights is really cool. Don't dismiss the idea, it may be more fun than you expect. It took me by surprise. I actually look forward to suiting up to hit the road at night.
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Old 01-01-20, 06:52 AM
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Originally Posted by TheDudeIsHere View Post
I would suggest getting some lights and riding at night. I'm guessing about 1/4 of my mileage was at night over the last couple of years.

I was hesitant at first but wow, so nice and exhilarating! Peaceful, quiet and because it is night, you can see just about every vehicle and thing coming toward you. I rode from my front door and was actually excited about it. If I could, I would probably do longer 40 milers in the dark but an hour is usually about my allowance on weeknights. But is sure is fun!

I got a couple of USB charging lights and love them. I use 2 since I have them and they work fine. The most I have to worry about here is about 45 degrees on night rides though. But some tights, under layer, jersey and a windbreaker are good for me, even in the light rain of night.

I started riding more at night being limited on weekends last couple of years and I am not sorry I started riding at night.

Every once in a while I will ride in the rain at night because it is so AWESOME!
The bike routes around here wind through some pretty sketchy areas.. it's creepy enough in the daytime..
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Old 01-01-20, 06:27 PM
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Some will give me guff for saying this but commuting in the dark is one thing, riding for fitness and/or weight loss in the dark is quite another. Riding in the dark is very dangerous and not at all a best practice. But the risks are worth it when the ride is part of a daily commute. Were it me and I had the space for a fitness area in a garage I would have a rowing machine and/or an elliptical (with arm extension) than a bike trainer. 10 minutes of rowing is the equivalent of 20 minutes of cycling. Any decent gym or fitness center will have all three forms of cardio and you can't drop your front wheel into a pothole and break your clavicle because it was zero dark thirty and raining. I know skinny people that have horrible A1C's. They are functionally diabetic although skinny and seemingly fit. Why? They have no muscle mass. Being too skinny is as bad as being too heavy. Just riding the bike or dieting to a fare thee well is only 1/2 of being healthy. If your genetics do not give you a naturally muscular physique you have to spend some time each week lifting heavy things so you will build lean muscle mass. Gyms are great for this. Some people hate them. Fine. Put the equipment in your garage. But opting out of strength training because gyms are yucky means you are missing out on a vital component of being healthy and fit. I am on a bike everyday but I don't ride to be fit. I use a gym to be fit so I can ride. I must ride because that is how me (and mine) get around our city.
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Old 01-01-20, 10:03 PM
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Originally Posted by Leisesturm View Post
Riding in the dark is very dangerous and not at all a best practice.
Oh, OK!

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Old 01-01-20, 11:24 PM
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But there aren't any cars jamming the roads not noticing you at night...the holidays are a bad time to live next to the retail mecca of town and interstate highway exchange. There isn't even ice and snow to compound it. I suspect it will be back to boring in a few more daze.
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Old 01-01-20, 11:25 PM
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And lest I forget, I am proud of you, fellow Clyde!
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Old 01-02-20, 05:38 AM
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Getting out the door is definitely the biggest challenge for me. In the good riding weather, I try to keep things on hand to grab a quick breakfast with little fuss since I cannot ride on an empty stomach. Right now it is too cold and dark for me and realistically it will be spring before I take the bike out on the road.
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Old 01-02-20, 09:08 AM
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Originally Posted by GAtkins View Post
Many thanks for the great ideas and support. Also, congrats to you all making progress on the weight issue. I've fought that demon for a long time.

Many of these ideas I've given some thought to, more or less. Zwift and a trainer are definitely in the future, I just don't know when - that cost versus wanting a new bike in the spring, ugh!

zjrog Yeah, I've got all the doodads and I chuckled at your description of a "half-smart" trainer.

Many thanks again for the ideas. Happy New Year to everyone!

Glenn
I never really fought weight until I retired from the Navy 18 years ago... And even then, not really until 11 years ago. The more I did to lose, the more I seemed to gain. Ultimately, 2 years ago things got out of hand, healthwise. And at 378, with looming heart issues, high blood pressure and pre-diabetes, I chose weight loss surgery as a a means to the end. I didn't expect it to be a silver bullet cure. But a tool to get me where I can do again, for myself. Happily, I'm a bit under the weight I was when I retired, and setting my goals lower still.

The "half smart" is apt, as it only sends info, not takes feedback... Like a bossy kid... But it is indeed a step up from nothing and gives ME feedback I didn't have before. For the cost of my used trainer $90 and the iNride sensor for $50, it has returned that value to me already. And I can see moving up to a smart trainer next winter... Shoot, I planned on only 135 miles for Dec, starting 9 Dec after a toe amputation before Thanksgiving. Wound up with 239 miles...

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Old 01-02-20, 09:12 AM
  #20  
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Originally Posted by Leisesturm View Post
Some will give me guff for saying this but commuting in the dark is one thing, riding for fitness and/or weight loss in the dark is quite another. Riding in the dark is very dangerous and not at all a best practice. But the risks are worth it when the ride is part of a daily commute. Were it me and I had the space for a fitness area in a garage I would have a rowing machine and/or an elliptical (with arm extension) than a bike trainer. 10 minutes of rowing is the equivalent of 20 minutes of cycling. Any decent gym or fitness center will have all three forms of cardio and you can't drop your front wheel into a pothole and break your clavicle because it was zero dark thirty and raining. I know skinny people that have horrible A1C's. They are functionally diabetic although skinny and seemingly fit. Why? They have no muscle mass. Being too skinny is as bad as being too heavy. Just riding the bike or dieting to a fare thee well is only 1/2 of being healthy. If your genetics do not give you a naturally muscular physique you have to spend some time each week lifting heavy things so you will build lean muscle mass. Gyms are great for this. Some people hate them. Fine. Put the equipment in your garage. But opting out of strength training because gyms are yucky means you are missing out on a vital component of being healthy and fit. I am on a bike everyday but I don't ride to be fit. I use a gym to be fit so I can ride. I must ride because that is how me (and mine) get around our city.
I use the rowing machine frequently at the gym. I'd love to add one to my cardio cave... If I could afford a good, and had the room... And I have a home gym in my basement, collecting dust, and boxes stacked on it... If I had a larger garage, it would be a complete gym, no doubt. Elliptical machine and I don't get along well, knee and ankle issues..
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Old 01-02-20, 10:25 AM
  #21  
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Thats awesome GAtkins! Congrats on the weight loss and getting back in, (on?) the saddle and the milage!

I too have a weight issue, at 63 and 260 with arthritis issues and anxiety issues as well I also have problems getting out the door.

I have no solutions I just want to congratulate you and say keep it going!
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Old 01-02-20, 04:06 PM
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Oh, yes! Once I'm actually on two wheels, I'm going! But, it's sure easy to make excuse after excuse to NOT...and I always know I have a great time once I'm out there.
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Old 01-02-20, 04:43 PM
  #23  
masi61
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The fact that you are leaving from your garage and not driving to your ride is a big time saver from the get go. I mean embarking on a ride does require some pre-planning and motivation but once you establish a bit of a pre-ride ritual, getting underway shouldn’t be bad.

For me me it means taking my bike outside and leaning it on the plastic body panel of my Honda Element. I inflate my tires before each ride (since I use latex inner tubes that lose pressure between rides) and then check the pressures with my Lezyne digital tire pressure gauge.

Then I fetch my water bottles. I fetch a banana, an apple and a Clif Bar (which I scissor the top off the package for easy access on the road). I get dressed in my riding apparel based on the temperature conditions, usually having multiple layers of a base layer of some sort, a short or long sleeve jersey and bib shorts or knickers and thermal wool or summer wool socks along with my Sidi shoes or my Fizik winter boots, the correct gloves and a thermal or summer head cover to go with my helmet.

I then grab my cell phone, start up my FitBit and Endomondo app - put the phone and all my snacks in my jersey or jacket pocket, make sure my USB Cateye blinky tail light or my other bike’s cygolight battery is fully charged and my headlight is mounted and charged if I’ll be out at dusk. Then I do one quick lap around the block after mounting up and closing the garage door. Occasionally I have to pop back inside for something I forgot - do I need to use Flonase, or did I need some naproxyn for some ache or pain?

I also use a 2 chain waxed chain setup on my 9 speed and my 10 speed bikes. I try to remember if the chain was getting noisy or less than smooth in some way and maybe put the cleanly waxed back up chain on quickly if need be.

Anyway, once these pre-ride rituals are made into habits - the speed to get everything in order gets shorter and shorter. So being motivated to do all that stuff is no big deal. The real reward comes with the ability to relax as your focus now only needs to be on riding the bike, and enjoying yourself.

Last edited by masi61; 01-03-20 at 09:51 AM.
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Old 01-04-20, 05:31 AM
  #24  
breadbin
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Originally Posted by Leisesturm View Post
Some will give me guff for saying this but commuting in the dark is one thing, riding for fitness and/or weight loss in the dark is quite another. Riding in the dark is very dangerous and not at all a best practice. But the risks are worth it when the ride is part of a daily commute. Were it me and I had the space for a fitness area in a garage I would have a rowing machine and/or an elliptical (with arm extension) than a bike trainer. 10 minutes of rowing is the equivalent of 20 minutes of cycling. Any decent gym or fitness center will have all three forms of cardio and you can't drop your front wheel into a pothole and break your clavicle because it was zero dark thirty and raining. I know skinny people that have horrible A1C's. They are functionally diabetic although skinny and seemingly fit. Why? They have no muscle mass. Being too skinny is as bad as being too heavy. Just riding the bike or dieting to a fare thee well is only 1/2 of being healthy. If your genetics do not give you a naturally muscular physique you have to spend some time each week lifting heavy things so you will build lean muscle mass. Gyms are great for this. Some people hate them. Fine. Put the equipment in your garage. But opting out of strength training because gyms are yucky means you are missing out on a vital component of being healthy and fit. I am on a bike everyday but I don't ride to be fit. I use a gym to be fit so I can ride. I must ride because that is how me (and mine) get around our city.
Theres always one! Let them figure it out for themselves if it's too dangerous. In my experience with both cycling and driving, there is no added danger cycling at night if you are adequately lit up. But like everything else no one size fits all.

But I do feel your pain OP. I find I am nearly euphoric when I'm on the bike but find it a struggle to get out. The best advice someone said above me is to get a cycling buddy or a club to motivate you. Guilt is a great motivator and you wont want to let them down by not turning up😁. Congrats on the weight loss!
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Old 01-05-20, 05:05 PM
  #25  
ts99
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Wait, this is a Clydesdale forum, a guy says he has a hard time getting out the garage door, and no one makes the obvious joke? Come on, guys.

I'm the ~same age and weight as the OP btw.
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