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What pump do you recommend?

Old 09-15-20, 02:55 PM
  #1  
koenbro
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What pump do you recommend?

I am looking to add a pump to my recently built steel 520 tourer. Ideally something that attaches to the top tube. I do not have braze-ons and do not want to mess with the paint to add them. Prefer top-quality and Iím willing to pay for it (does not have to look expensive or techie; retro look preferred, but not important).

Any recommendations? Should I get one that has a built-in pressure gauge? Should I get one that adapts CO2 cartridges or should be manual only?

Thank you for your help.
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Old 09-15-20, 03:28 PM
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Some time back I wrote up a comparison of the Road Morph G and the similar Lezyne pump. These are the most popular for touring.
https://www.bikeforums.net/touring/1...l#post18521373

Without braze-ons, the best way to carry it may be in a pannier. I have carried either a Lezyne or Road Morph G on every one of my bike tours.

And if you are not carrying a pannier, an older style frame pump may work best. I have some older frame pumps and carry one of those on my road bike and sometimes on my rando bike. These pumps don't have gauges, often you just pump it up as much as you can and then use a better pump later when you have access to one.

In this photo, I have an old frame fit Zefal pump parallel to and below my top tube. That bike does not have a pump peg on the head tube, but I use a velcro strap near the front of the bike that keeps the pump from slipping down the headtube. I am not saying this pump is the best option, just saying it is one of many options.




If you do not have a water bottle cage on your seat tube, a pump like that easily fits parallel to and in front of the seat tube, that was the most common way to carry these pumps decades ago before people started putting bottle cages on seat tubes.

With frame pumps, the pump length is specific to a frame, the pumps are sold in different lengths to fit different size bikes.

Your question on CO2, I can't answer that because I have never used CO2.
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Old 09-15-20, 05:47 PM
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Originally Posted by koenbro View Post
I am looking to add a pump to my recently built steel 520 tourer. Ideally something that attaches to the top tube. I do not have braze-ons and do not want to mess with the paint to add them. Prefer top-quality and Iím willing to pay for it (does not have to look expensive or techie; retro look preferred, but not important).

Any recommendations? Should I get one that has a built-in pressure gauge? Should I get one that adapts CO2 cartridges or should be manual only?

Thank you for your help.
Most of the pumps that do both donít have much capacity for pumping. They are a pretty poor minipump. I would say the same about just about any micropump. The Topeak Morphs arenít a micropumps but they arenít overly large either.

Carbon dioxide works but it does diffuse out quickly. A tire that is pressurized with CO2 will probably be flat overnight without any leaks. The CO2 is also a single shot kind of thing. The question to ask is how many cartridges you think youíll need and how many you want to carry? A pump refills on every stroke.

As for carrying one, this is a Topeak Road Morph carried on the top tube. The pump comes with a mount that is meant to screw into a water bottle mount but it takes all of the mount. Zip ties, a bit of double backed adhesive, and the provided Velcro strap will keep it very securely in place.

2015-05-03 11.38.54 by Stuart Black, on Flickr

You can find mounts that go under the water bottle cage that work as well. Both work. I have all of my pumps mounted under the water bottle cage now. The under the top tube one is a bit of a pain if you need to carry the bike for any reason.

_IMG4968 by Stuart Black, on Flickr
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Old 09-15-20, 05:58 PM
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Comparing Topeak Road Morph G and Lezyne Micro Floor Drive Pumps.
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Old 09-15-20, 06:57 PM
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the type of pumps that work like a small floor pump are so much nicer and easier to use. Easy to attach the head on a hose to the valve, and to push your weight down into the ground means its easier and more efficient pumping.
Most of us who use these types of pumps feel the same, well I do anyway after using frame type longer pumps (I had numerous zefal ones) for decades.

I'd recommend going to a real bike store and trying them out, you'll also get a better idea of the build quality first hand.
my road morph G, with a gauge, has worked great for years. I carry it in a pannier usually, prefer to keep it out of the dust and less chance of a grab and run while touring when Im in a store, and like all pumps, the little end bit that you unscrew and flip around the innards to swtich between presta and shraeder can come loose with time, and you could loose the innards, and not have a working pump. Mine loosened up luckily in a pannier so didint loose the parts, but this was after years of using it, and I hadnt really paid attention to the part loosening over time.
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Old 09-15-20, 07:46 PM
  #6  
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Wow, that is very helpful guys!

I started out considering a long pump under the top tube, but the comment above re: how it interferes with carrying the bike makes me now favor a pump attached to/under the water bottle cage, versus carrying it in the pannier. Also am less interested now in CO2. Thank you cyccommute

Tourist in MSN - your comments and the dedicated thread are a wealth of information, as usual.

After reading up, I ordered a Lezyne Micro Floor Drive High Volume and will probably carry it in a bag or pannier. Maybe adapt it to the down tube if I can. Thanks again!!
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Old 09-15-20, 08:27 PM
  #7  
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I got a Topeak Turbo Morph Digital earlier this season. My other pump on my touring bike is a Bontrager Air Rush combo mini pump/CO2. I have had to use the pump and the time I did use it I was pretty irritated with it. The housing needed to be tightened (screws together and was loose = wouldn't hold much pressure until I figured it out).

Since then I have taken a floor pump with me on some rides so I had the convenience (not long tours, just day rides up to about 40 or 50 miles maybe).

The Turbo Morph Digital is a nice 1/2 way point between a mini pump and a floor pump. It definitely does get air in to a tire better than a valve-mounted mini pump. I've used mine several times on both Schrader and Presta valve tires to try it. I have found that the nozzle takes some fiddling with at times to get it to seal well, but I find that to be the case with most pumps so I don't consider that a defect.

For more on the Turbo Morph Digital see the thread I have in the Bicycle Mechanics forum here:
https://www.bikeforums.net/bicycle-m...ital-pump.html
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Old 09-16-20, 01:54 AM
  #8  
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Another vote for the Topeak Road Morph G. Adaptable for presta or mtb valves. My only minor gripe is that the latch that holds the "foot" has broken on two of my pumps, leaving it still attached but hanging down a bit (you can just see that in my pic). While I'm at it, I think Topeak could improve the quarter twist latch that locks the handle when not in use. Check that the handle doesn't screw itself up and come loose over time. I have a mini morph in my commuting kit as it's smaller, but the hose is a bit short imo. In rainy/muddy conditions, a condom over the nozzle keeps things safe, especially if your pump is low hanging!

edit to add: A presta to car tire adapter is good to have if your pump fails. I have one screwed onto rear wheel valve.


Last edited by imi; 09-16-20 at 02:01 AM.
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Old 09-16-20, 06:54 AM
  #9  
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Originally Posted by koenbro View Post
...
After reading up, I ordered a Lezyne Micro Floor Drive High Volume and will probably carry it in a bag or pannier. Maybe adapt it to the down tube if I can. Thanks again!!
In that other thread I mentioned that I would use the high pressure one on tires narrower than 2.0 (or 50mm) and use the high volume on 2.0 and wider.

On a 520, considering the width of tires and tire pressures, I would prefer the high pressure version instead, but you probably are in a range where either would work.

The high pressure version would take longer to pump it up, but your arms are less worn out when you are done.
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Old 09-16-20, 08:55 AM
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I'm a Topeak Road Morph fan. I mounted one on the top tube for a while, until I took the pump off to mount the bike on a bike carrier and drove off leaving the pump somewhere along the way. Its replacement sits happily on the left seat stay, out of the way of the rack and panniers, out of the way of the bike carrier, but quickly ready for use when it's needed.

But here's hoping you'll never need a pump on the road!
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Old 09-16-20, 09:02 AM
  #11  
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I have both the Topeak masterblaster and the zefal hpx and a bunch of mini pumps. I prefer the bigger frame pumps most of the time.
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Old 09-16-20, 09:48 AM
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Originally Posted by Tourist in MSN View Post
In that other thread I mentioned that I would use the high pressure one on tires narrower than 2.0 (or 50mm) and use the high volume on 2.0 and wider.

On a 520, considering the width of tires and tire pressures, I would prefer the high pressure version instead, but you probably are in a range where either would work.

The high pressure version would take longer to pump it up, but your arms are less worn out when you are done.

Yeah, it's possible I drew the wrong conclusion. I run 44mm tires, set them up tubeless, and inflate them to 50 psi in the back and 40-45psi in the front. I thought high volume is what I need over pressure. Will see.
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Old 09-16-20, 10:01 AM
  #13  
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Originally Posted by koenbro View Post
Yeah, it's possible I drew the wrong conclusion. I run 44mm tires, set them up tubeless, and inflate them to 50 psi in the back and 40-45psi in the front. I thought high volume is what I need over pressure. Will see.
At up to 50 psi, you probably made the right choice. I assumed on a 520 you would be running narrower tires, but your pressures probably favor the high volume pump better. If I had a 520, I would probably be putting 80 psi in the rear, 60 in the front on 32mm tires.

You said tubeless, does that mean you have removable presta valve cores? If so, you should tighten them enough so that the valve core does not stay in the pump chuck when you take the pump off of the tire. And part of that is avoiding threading the chuck onto the valve stem too tightly. I have used a thread locker like Loctite on the threads on some of my removable core presta valve stems, but if you try that be very careful to avoid getting any thread locker in the check valve, as that might prevent the valve from seating firmly.
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Old 09-16-20, 11:22 AM
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Originally Posted by Tourist in MSN View Post
At up to 50 psi, you probably made the right choice. I assumed on a 520 you would be running narrower tires, but your pressures probably favor the high volume pump better. If I had a 520, I would probably be putting 80 psi in the rear, 60 in the front on 32mm tires.
Yeah I am rolling on higher volume, softer tires. Currently have smooth 44mm but have ordered some 42mm knobbies that I have on my other bike and found they roll adequately on smooth pavement.

Current tires are 44mm, extra soft wall

This is what I run on my Trek FX, and have ordered a set for the 520 as well (42 mm wide)






Originally Posted by Tourist in MSN View Post
You said tubeless, does that mean you have removable presta valve cores? If so, you should tighten them enough so that the valve core does not stay in the pump chuck when you take the pump off of the tire. And part of that is avoiding threading the chuck onto the valve stem too tightly. I have used a thread locker like Loctite on the threads on some of my removable core presta valve stems, but if you try that be very careful to avoid getting any thread locker in the check valve, as that might prevent the valve from seating firmly.
So I am very new at this, and perhaps tubeless is not right for long tours, but in Arizona, tiny thorns are everywhere. You don't have to offroad, they are there even on the cleanest suburban road, and I had some flats out of the blue when I started biking in March. So one either goes extra stiff/hard or tubeless. Did not have any flats since I converted to tubeless. Interestingly, when I swapped out one set of tires for another (both tubeless) and ran my hand on the inside of the tires just removed there were several thorns penetrating through the casing, not visible from the outside, yet I did not experience a flat.

But when touring, I suppose it's prudent to carry some tubes for a quick roadside fix.

Thank you for the tip on Presta cores -- I do run removable cores, to be able to pour the sealant. So that's a level of complication I am going to have to get used.

Last edited by koenbro; 09-16-20 at 05:13 PM.
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Old 09-16-20, 02:53 PM
  #15  
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I picked up a Leyzene Road Drive cage at a huge discount from Sierra Trading Post and picked up a Leyzene pump online. I really like how the pump bracket is an integrated part of the cage and how the pump is set up to do presta or schrader. The small diameter of the pump is good for high pressure tires, but would slow down the amount of time it takes to pump up large volume tires.

Leyzene cage and pump
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Old 09-16-20, 05:31 PM
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For your consideration I've been a happy customer with a Topeak Morph air pump for the past 13 years.
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Old 09-18-20, 11:46 PM
  #17  
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My vote is for the Lezyne Micro Floor Drive HV, though I would opt for the version without the built in gauge, which I found to become brittle, suffering cracking, in strong sunlight.

When they first came out, you were able to order about every part as a spare, but after a year of trouble free touring use and the gauge giving up the ghost, I was unable to source a replacement gauge at the time.

Being so pleased with the pump otherwise, I replaced the pump with the same model, available without the gauge.

I'd replace with the same again if it gave another issue I've been so happy with it.

Mine sits on the downtube. on the included bracket that sits behind the bottle cage.

It has a velcro wrap to keep it in position and its never fallen from the bike.
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Old 09-19-20, 06:37 PM
  #18  
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Another vote for Topeak Road Morph G. The few who don't like it probably haven't used it. For what it is it is a really top notch pump.
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Old 09-19-20, 09:57 PM
  #19  
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If I had seen this before I got my Turbo Morph Digital I probably would have looked harder to find one. I looked online briefly to see what the pricing was but can't find anyone that carries it for sale?

https://www.topeak.com/global/de/pro...ga-morph%C2%AE

The benefit is it is a larger frame pump - similar in size to a conventional floor pump with a longer hose. I'd prefer the increase in size/ergonomics over the Turbo Morph Digital.

I will say that I haven't used my floor pump since I started using the Turbo Morph Digital just to run it through its' paces. I do feel very confident and comfortable with its' use in that I can get to riding pressure without concern. My main gripe is the ergonomics of the small pump and short hose. However non-ergonomic as it is to use, though, it blows the pants off any other portable pump I've used (that attaches directly to the valve stem) - by anchoring to the ground it is easier to get leverage on it to crank the pressure up, as opposed to trying to stabilize a wheel and not put much pressure on a valve stem in the process of trying to crank the pressure up.
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Old 09-20-20, 06:41 AM
  #20  
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Everything you say about how much easier it is to pump and not worry about valve is exactly why these designs of pumps have become so popular, they just function really well.
A Few other brands make similar designs, I got my wife one and it works fine also.
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Old 09-20-20, 07:54 AM
  #21  
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Originally Posted by KC8QVO View Post
If I had seen this before I got my Turbo Morph Digital I probably would have looked harder to find one. I looked online briefly to see what the pricing was but can't find anyone that carries it for sale?

https://www.topeak.com/global/de/pro...ga-morph%C2%AE

The benefit is it is a larger frame pump - similar in size to a conventional floor pump with a longer hose. I'd prefer the increase in size/ergonomics over the Turbo Morph Digital.
.....
It is a nice looking pump, but at over a kilogram, not for me.

The high volume version of the Lezyne Micro Floor Drive took a while for me to pump up my 57mm wide tires when I assembled my bike after flying to another country, but I would rather trade the extra 10 minutes it took me that month to keep my tires pumped up with a pump that weighs 211 grams (not counting bracket weight).

I bought one of these on a whim at a closeout sale, very similar to the one you cited, but at 280 grams, still heavier than I would want to carry on a tour. I have this on one of my bikes for riding around home. Excluding bracket, mine is 273 grams.
https://www.topeak.com/global/de/pro...turbo-morphģ-g

The only reason I bought it (besides clearance price) was that I hoped I could read the gauge without glasses. It has a little pointer that I need glasses to set it, but do not need glasses to see the pointer.

But, if you want to carry 1.1 kg pump on a tour, go ahead. Nobody has ever accused me of being an ultra light camper, but even I would not lug around a 1.1 kg pump.

If you were part of a family group of half a dozen riders, I could see one of those for group use on a tour.

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Old 09-20-20, 09:44 AM
  #22  
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Originally Posted by Tourist in MSN View Post
But, if you want to carry 1.1 kg pump on a tour, go ahead. Nobody has ever accused me of being an ultra light camper, but even I would not lug around a 1.1 kg pump.

If you were part of a family group of half a dozen riders, I could see one of those for group use on a tour.
I did have a flat on a trip last year (first time ever on a trip) and had to use my mini pump (bontrager air rush road, I believe). I patched the tube, didn't have a spare with me at the time, but had a hard time finding the leak. I ended up over-inflating the tube to about 2.5x the diameter of the tire to get enough air in there to spread the hole further = bigger leak. Then once I got the tire back together I found I couldn't get pressure on the pump. What I found was the pump body was "loose". The assembly screws together. Once I figured that out I tightened it down and was able to get it to work. Now that I know that I am more confident with the pump. Anywho - trying to get the small pump to work and the effort it took to get to riding pressure, to me, wasn't worth it. So after that I actually got in the mode of toting my regular floor pump with me. I used a piece of cord to tie the handle back so it was locked in place and just strapped it to the top of my rear rack. Yeah it's bulky and adds some weight, but nothing beats a floor pump when you're dealing with a flat or need to add pressure. OK, maybe an air compressor already charged... but I'm not going to carry an air compressor with me.

One of my riding partners' bikes has schrader valve stems. On some of our rides I've taken the same floor pump because it does both valves. For 2 people it becomes a bit more "logical".

Of course, to each their own.

I have to say, I have never used a CO2 inflator. The mini pump I have is a combo hand pump + CO2 though, and actually that is the main reason I decided to put it back on the bike along with the Road Morph Digital. CO2 is the only valve stem-mounted inflator type I would recommend. The reason being - you aren't "pumping" and in the motion/force of pumping isn't transferring any load to the valve stem.
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Old 09-20-20, 11:38 AM
  #23  
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Originally Posted by KC8QVO View Post
I did have a flat on a trip last year (first time ever on a trip) and had to use my mini pump (bontrager air rush road, I believe). I patched the tube, didn't have a spare with me at the time, but had a hard time finding the leak. ... ...
Touring, I carry two tubes, plus a patch kit. Reason for two tubes is that it is rare, but on occasion I have a blow out. Example, about a month ago I used a new tube in a new tire, while pumping it up, the brand new tube blew along a seam on the tube and left a slit about 6 inches long. Hard to patch a 6 inch long tear. About five years ago had a tube get a cut from a rim abrasion right next to the stem, that could not be patched either.

I never try to patch a tube when I flat, I use a spare tube. And I do not even look for the leak to patch it until I am in the campsite so I can do things more leisurely where I can be more careful about cleanliness, etc.

Around home I only carry one tube, but when touring carry two in case of a blowout.
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Old 09-20-20, 01:21 PM
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escii_35
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Frame pump Topek WHY? SMALL PARTS BOX OF GOODNESS. Three times bikes shops have provided me with SMALL PARTS from a Topek supplied box of replacement widgets. In the age of manufacturers forcing consumers to buy new it warms my heart.
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Old 09-20-20, 02:48 PM
  #25  
79pmooney
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Originally Posted by Tourist in MSN View Post
Some time back I wrote up a comparison of the Road Morph G and the similar Lezyne pump. These are the most popular for touring.
https://www.bikeforums.net/touring/1...l#post18521373

Without braze-ons, the best way to carry it may be in a pannier. I have carried either a Lezyne or Road Morph G on every one of my bike tours.

And if you are not carrying a pannier, an older style frame pump may work best. I have some older frame pumps and carry one of those on my road bike and sometimes on my rando bike. These pumps don't have gauges, often you just pump it up as much as you can and then use a better pump later when you have access to one.

In this photo, I have an old frame fit Zefal pump parallel to and below my top tube. That bike does not have a pump peg on the head tube, but I use a velcro strap near the front of the bike that keeps the pump from slipping down the headtube. I am not saying this pump is the best option, just saying it is one of many options.




If you do not have a water bottle cage on your seat tube, a pump like that easily fits parallel to and in front of the seat tube, that was the most common way to carry these pumps decades ago before people started putting bottle cages on seat tubes.

With frame pumps, the pump length is specific to a frame, the pumps are sold in different lengths to fit different size bikes.

Your question on CO2, I can't answer that because I have never used CO2.
Excellent solution! I like. Those Zephals are workhorses. Carry one of those and you don't need anything else. (Edit: for inflation. You still need the spare tubes and/or patches and probably tire irons. Those pumps are good but they don't do magic.) I lived car free riding sewups for a decade and used nothing but their predecessors.

I use the plastic clamp-on pegs Zephal makes (and I believe comes with the pump) on my bikes without HT pegs. Go one pump size shorter if you go that route. One Velcro pump strap for each of my bikes, run under the brake housing.

Ben

Last edited by 79pmooney; 09-20-20 at 02:52 PM.
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