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Which Lugged Steel All-Rounder?

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Which Lugged Steel All-Rounder?

Old 04-08-20, 09:32 PM
  #26  
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There are significantly more mountain bikes than the one you list that had Deore LX/DX/XT. It's not really worth making a list as there are that many. It may be possible to list the lugged models, in which you are missing Bianchi. The super grizzly was their highest I believe.

Edit: if I remember correctly, the Trek 790 was only available for 2 years, 1990 was red, and there is a blue one which was a year or two later. I saved/restored a red one a few years ago, but have already sold it off since it didn't fit my fiance. I'd suggest adding the Trek 750 as they were made for more years.


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Old 04-08-20, 10:01 PM
  #27  
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Originally Posted by c0rbin9 View Post
For anyone interested, here is a list of candidates I have compiled.

MTB:
*Miyata Terra Runner (relaxed geometry)
*Diamondback Ridge Runner (relaxed geometry)
*Specialized StumpJumper (pre-1987 relaxed, post aggressive)
Specialized RockHopper
*Bridgestone MB-1/MB-2
Schwinn High Sierra (pre-1985)
Schwinn Cimarron
*Trek 950/970/990
Diamondback Ascent/Apex
Univega

*1992 XO-1 - Purple Metallic or **Pearl Tusk**
1992 X0-2 - Dark Green Metallic or Pearl White
*1993 XO-1 - Orange
*1993 XO-2 - Purple Metallic
*1993 XO-3 - Dark Metallic Green or Red
1994 XO-3 -

Hybrids:
*Schwinn Crosscut
***Trek 790 Multitrak
Bianchi Advantage
*Miyata Triple Cross
Specialized Crossroads
**Gary Fisher Sphinx
**Diamondback Overdrive/Override

Touring:
Bridgestone RB-T
Bridgestone T-500
Bridgestone T-700
Centurion Pro Tour 15
Centurion Elite GT 15
Fuji Touring Series IV
Fuji Touring Series V
Fuji Del Rey
Fuji America circa 1980
Lotus Odyssey
Miyata 610
Miyata 1000
Nishiki Continental
Nishiki Cresta GT
Nishiki International (note, not all years are full CrMo or full touring)
Nishiki Riviera GT
Nishiki Seral
Novara Randonee
Panasonic PT-3500
Panasonic PT-5000
Panasonic Pro Touring
Panasonic Touring Deluxe
Raleigh Alyeska
Raleigh Kodiak
Raleigh Portage
Raleigh Super Tourer
Raleigh Touring 18
Schwinn Paramount P15-9 Tourer
Schwinn Passage
Schwinn Super Sport, 1981
Schwinn Voyageur/Voyageur SP
Specialized Sequoia
Specialized Expedition
Trek 520
Trek 620
Trek 720
Univega Gran Tourismo
Univega Specialisima

The asterisks denote bikes which were higher-end in the model line ups and/or ones of particular interest. I have the Bridgestone XO bikes in a separate category with each model listed. Only the models marked with an asterisk have lugged frames. Strangely, the XO-2 from the first year of production didn't have a lugged frame, but the XO-3 from the following year did.

I've come to realize my riding distances are so short that a vintage mountain bike with it's utility would probably serve best. It seems production vintage mountain bikes fall into two distinct groups - first, the early mountain bikes from '82-'87 or so, which had more upright riding positions and heavier build, and second, bikes from the late 80s-early 90s which had more racy riding positions and which were lighter than the older models. Is this a fair assessment? And if so, what do these differences mean for the bike's use as a light trail/short distance city runabout?
Pick one. Ride it. Modify what doesn't work until you it dead ends. Get another one, sell the old one if you're not into collecting. Rinse and repeat. You might find that you want more than one bike for different uses.
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Old 04-10-20, 02:20 AM
  #28  
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I did a similar search for similar reasons and ended up with a 1994 Trek 730, and I'm super happy with it. I adore this bike. Supple steel, 700C (I put 38s on) and a good fit. It comes with rear rack mounts but not front, in this year model, although you can find them with or buy a replacement fork separately. Anyway lovin' it, and you may find these to be more plentiful than 750s or (for sure) 790s.

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Old 04-10-20, 09:24 AM
  #29  
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A couple years ago I was downsizing a bit and decided I needed only one all-rounder. The choice came down to keeping either a 1992 Stumpjumper Comp with drop bars (not lugged) or an 87 Trek 520 Cirrus. I chose the Stumpy as it was more different from my other bikes and can take fatter tires. But that Trek was one smooth rider and could easily take 700 x 32 tires with fenders.
In the end there are loads of good choices. How it fits, how you set it up and especially how good the wheels and tires are will matter as much as the frame.
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Old 04-10-20, 11:16 AM
  #30  
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Trek was such an interesting company. Midwest American company putting out top quality lugged steel frames. In-house tube manufacturing. American manufacturing values of build quality, value, longevity. They have a unique place in bicycle history IMO and their vintage frames have undeniable cachet.
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Old 04-10-20, 11:41 AM
  #31  
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Originally Posted by katsup View Post
There are significantly more mountain bikes than the one you list that had Deore LX/DX/XT. It's not really worth making a list as there are that many. It may be possible to list the lugged models, in which you are missing Bianchi. The super grizzly was their highest I believe.

Edit: if I remember correctly, the Trek 790 was only available for 2 years, 1990 was red, and there is a blue one which was a year or two later. I saved/restored a red one a few years ago, but have already sold it off since it didn't fit my fiance. I'd suggest adding the Trek 750 as they were made for more years.

The early '90s hybrids, especially the upper end models were such great bikes, as were Bianchi's Project series bikes.
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Old 04-10-20, 03:15 PM
  #32  
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It was an odd feeling to open a thread and see my old bike at the top!

These darn 650b conversions are like a bad habit that's hard to break. I love the concept of a relatively cheap to buy frame, lugs, skinny tubing, and fat tires. But usually the long reach brakes end up being too weak, or the wheels stink, or something, so I sell off everything at a big loss, until the bug hits and I get the itch to start whole process over. That's about where I am now.

Anyway, for the OP, an old mountain bike or 26" hybrid with nice tire could make a great all rounder. As a tall guy, though, it's hard for me to get the bars high enough on many old mtbs. So I find myself looking at old road bikes to convert. Again.

Originally Posted by c0rbin9 View Post
Here's a link to the whole build:

https://bikingtoplay.blogspot.com/20...onversion.html

I'm sure the author will appreciate it since I stole his picture after all.
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Old 04-10-20, 04:56 PM
  #33  
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Something tells me a Trek 750 Multitrack 650b conversion would be awesome. Smaller wheels lower the bottom bracket, better handling, a bit more cushion but still roadworthy. It's the DIY Bridgestone XO-1.

EDIT: It seems brakes would be a problem.

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Old 04-10-20, 05:23 PM
  #34  
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I try not to be negative

But this thread had me curious about Waterford Bikes so I went to their site. I don't know if they're intentionally trying to not sell bikes / frames, but their website is helping in that effort.

No bike builds. Only 1 side view of an upright frame. One spec page had something to the effect of "rear dropouts - welded".... oh really, not soldering or super gluing any?

Please, hire a 22 year old to fix the site....
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Old 04-10-20, 05:49 PM
  #35  
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Maybe it's been said already, but make sure to get a nice set of tires. They will contribute a lot to a smooth ride.

As many have said, choose a frame and make small changes to get a comfortable fit. Rinse & repeat. If no more changes can be made, and it still doesn't feel right, try a new frame.
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Old 04-10-20, 06:52 PM
  #36  
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Originally Posted by c0rbin9 View Post
Trek was such an interesting company. Midwest American company putting out top quality lugged steel frames. In-house tube manufacturing. American manufacturing values of build quality, value, longevity. They have a unique place in bicycle history IMO and their vintage frames have undeniable cachet.
Wait, when did they manufacture their own tubing? The only company I heard that did that back in the day is Miyata.
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Old 04-10-20, 07:02 PM
  #37  
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Originally Posted by gugie View Post
You might find that you want more than one bike for different uses.
"might"

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Old 04-10-20, 07:26 PM
  #38  
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Originally Posted by Piff View Post
Wait, when did they manufacture their own tubing? The only company I heard that did that back in the day is Miyata.
I stand corrected, I thought True-Temper was their in house brand rather than a separate company.
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Old 04-10-20, 08:52 PM
  #39  
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Originally Posted by Piff View Post
Wait, when did they manufacture their own tubing? The only company I heard that did that back in the day is Miyata.
Didn't Schwinn & Raleigh make their own tubing too?
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Old 07-01-20, 07:48 PM
  #40  
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Originally Posted by thorstein View Post
Didn't Schwinn & Raleigh make their own tubing too?
I've heard of the in-house tubing plant for Schwinn's electro-forged process, but maybe there were other house-made tube sets I haven't heard of?

I've seen Raleigh tubing badges on their Huffy-made frames, not sure where the tubes came from originally. Tange is the only Taiwan tubing brand I know of .....
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Old 07-01-20, 08:13 PM
  #41  
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I’m a big fan of the Trek Multitracks. We’ve accumulated three, all 730s. I’d love to find a lugged 750, so I’ve been scouring craigslist and other localized bike sources for two years, but there have been none. But the 730 is great and I got the frame for free from a neighbor, so can’t complain about that! Of the three, I like my wife's the best, it’s a step over model and was built during one of the few years the 730 frame was made in the US. I forget the year, but it’s the forest green one. Somehow it feels more spritely and I think it ‘planes’.



This one’s mine, I turned it into a Paul Wellstone tribute bike. This was the first bike I ever got my hands dirty with and I’d probably make some different choices on the build today. But it’s a fun bike. It’s an errand runner, the bike I use when I’m with my kids, commuter, and I even took it out on an overnight bike packing excursion.
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Old 07-01-20, 08:21 PM
  #42  
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This my wifeís 730. She didnít like the green, so I repainted it cranberry. I bought some Viking decals to reflect her Norwegian heritage.
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Old 07-01-20, 08:45 PM
  #43  
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Originally Posted by c0rbin9 View Post
For anyone interested, here is a list of candidates I have compiled.

I've come to realize my riding distances are so short that a vintage mountain bike with it's utility would probably serve best. It seems production vintage mountain bikes fall into two distinct groups - first, the early mountain bikes from '82-'87 or so, which had more upright riding positions and heavier build, and second, bikes from the late 80s-early 90s which had more racy riding positions and which were lighter than the older models. Is this a fair assessment? And if so, what do these differences mean for the bike's use as a light trail/short distance city runabout?
Good list. I think your assessments are right. A short distance urban mtn flyer might need a little narrower, high pressure rims and tires, and some stock is getting harder to find. Or you can inflate some Conti Town and Country's on an '82 Araya RX7 and just push slightly harder.
I've recently been drawn into two hybrids on your list and I think 700c wheel & tire selection gives them a leg up.

'84 Norco Bigfoot, '91 Specialized Crossroads, and '91 Miyata TripleCross and my gravel town bikes. Yes, 90's mtn bikes perform better until bad suspension got them wrong but many rigids of the period are just great. I don't care for sloping toptubes in general. All these will except mudguards and racks


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Old 07-05-20, 04:03 PM
  #44  
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Interesting thread! If storage space isn't an issue, it may still be possible to score an old sport-tourer or name brand rigid MTB for cheap and play with it to see what you like, and get something different later on. Of course, I'm spoiled with sport-tourer pricing: I have one I don't ride these days (needs dropout repair) I got for $15 in ridable condition at a Goodwill ages ago, and another I found in the trash (not ridable) and have added about $100 in parts I like. Well, soon to be $170 ....

Interestingly, Mrs. 1987cp has been doing something similar to what was suggested above .... after thinking it was impossible not to hurt while riding, she picked up a brand new comfort bike several years ago and rode it a good bit while thinking how it could be better. Now that our 12 year old has "stolen" it, she's picked up a couple of other bikes, a rare(ish) recent model bought complete and arriving soon, and an '85ish frame we built up with parts on hand!

Right now there's an XO-4 frame on eBay for an okay price, and also a two year old 53cm Rivendell Atlantis (super hardcore allrounder) frame closing in 3 hours at the time of this posting, currently at half retail price! I'm on the lookout for something all-roundish myself right now, which is how I came across them. Of course, what I need more than another frame is a really large budget and an even larger shed so I can collect and/or horde at will ....
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Old 07-23-20, 12:03 PM
  #45  
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To update this thread, I ended up with a lugged Trek Multitrack 750 and I'm loving it. Still curious to try a vintage mountain bike though.
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Old 07-23-20, 06:32 PM
  #46  
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Originally Posted by c0rbin9 View Post
To update this thread, I ended up with a lugged Trek Multitrack 750 and I'm loving it. Still curious to try a vintage mountain bike though.
I appreciate this update and humbly request a picture of the 750!
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Old 07-23-20, 07:25 PM
  #47  
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Originally Posted by Piff View Post
Don't try to hit a home run on your first try. Get a bike that's pretty close to your desired needs in good condition for a decent price.

And then, 6 months from then, you'll probably do the same thing. Finally, on your third try, you might hit gold!
​​​​
Hmmm... is there a limit to how many tries one gets?
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Old 07-23-20, 07:37 PM
  #48  
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I'm surprised you mentioned the Crosscut and not its fancier sibling, the Crosspoint. Here's the 1992 catalog page.



Anyways, I had almost the same red Schwinn Crosscut as in the OP, which rode fine but I sold it to a co-worker without regret. But I just picked up a 1993 Trek 750 and I think it's a keeper. Don't sleep on the 750! (EDIT: I see you didn't)

Specialized used the Sequoia name on nice touring hybrids in the early 90's. Here's one from '93. I don't think I've ever seen one of these for sale though...



No mention of the Bianchi Project series? Certainly worthy of consideration.

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Old 07-23-20, 07:51 PM
  #49  
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blatant excuse to post the KOM again



Someone was actually selling its Japanese cousin (the Panasonic MC-7500, which this basically is a rebrand of) and I was legitimately tempted.
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Old 07-23-20, 08:16 PM
  #50  
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Originally Posted by belacqua View Post
I appreciate this update and humbly request a picture of the 750!
Ask and ye shall receive:






Love this logo

Since these pics were taken I have added Oury grips and Kool Stop brake pads.
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