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"I love vintage bikes except for _______"

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"I love vintage bikes except for _______"

Old 01-09-20, 01:49 AM
  #76  
Lascauxcaveman 
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Originally Posted by Drillium Dude View Post
...some people who can't seem to stop suggesting what kind of bike(s) I need to add to my collection.

There's only one person needs to be happy with my collection and that's me. And I am more than happy with it, thank you

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Old 01-09-20, 09:57 AM
  #77  
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I love vintage bikes except for the parts that I really need are ones that I lost, gave away, or mangled years ago and now can’t be found without hours on the internet and a stack of cash. And sometimes even t those things don’t help.

Last edited by Mr. Spadoni; 01-09-20 at 02:06 PM. Reason: Spelling. What else?
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Old 01-09-20, 10:04 AM
  #78  
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Originally Posted by mstateglfr View Post
- No love for the limited gearing range that came on quality road bikes in the 80s.
- Single (or no) bottle mounts. Absurd. Did people not drink much water 40-50 years ago?
Water? Who needed water? Wasn’t just cyclists who were scared of the wet stuff. I remember being told during practice for various sports not to drink too much water so as to avoid cramps. During practice, we had one water bucket, with a dipper, on the sidelines for 40 or so people. When it was gone, no more water till after practice.
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Old 01-09-20, 10:10 AM
  #79  
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Everything is fine with me except I use modern chains and spd pedals.
Otherwise, I'm cool with ~1978 technology.
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Old 01-09-20, 12:43 PM
  #80  
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Lack of tire clearence, and that I keep having to replace 23/25mm tires with 28/32mm (if they fit(with fenders))!

No faceplates on quill stems!

Old brake pads.

Narrow bars.

Going over a possible purchase and finding frame damage.

Going over a recent purchase at home, and THEN finding frame damage. 😧

Shippers who put a bike in a box without any padding or securing. At. All.

THIEVES.

Not having met any BF members in the Chicago area before moving to NYC.

Deciding which are keepers and which to move on, when they have all basically reached pet status.
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Old 01-09-20, 01:37 PM
  #81  
Ol Danl
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... that the world seems to have abandoned the 120 mm OLD, 5 speed rear wheel. 5 cogs were enough for me.
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Old 01-09-20, 01:39 PM
  #82  
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Originally Posted by Mr. Spadoni View Post
Water? Who needed water? Wasn’t just cyclists who were scared of the wet stuff. I remember being told during practice for various sports not to drink too much water so as to avoid cramps. During practice, we had one water bucket, with a dipper, on the sidelines for 40 or so people. When it was gone, no more water till after practice.
Not just to avoid cramps; I remember coaches telling players to train themselves to require less water. Salt crusting on your skin? Have a salt tablet!
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Old 01-09-20, 02:37 PM
  #83  
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Originally Posted by SurferRosa View Post
I think the mid '70s Motobécanes fit this bill better than any. I've never had to sand down a stem for one. The paint schemes "look classic." Yes, a swiss bb and french threaded steerer may be an issue if their components are botched. Guess I've gotten lucky in that regard. Generally, they're worth it. Just talking about Moto's top four american-market models...
Agreed - 78 Moto GT

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Old 01-09-20, 02:59 PM
  #84  
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Center-pull pads
Center pull pads eh? I think the old Mafac pads work better than a lot of modern stuff. You know, the ones with fibers embedded in them? I used to think they worked well because those fibers were asbestos, but then I took a cig lighter to one and they burn so I think they're actually cotton. Who knew?
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Old 01-09-20, 03:25 PM
  #85  
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Originally Posted by desconhecido View Post
Normandy hubs are pretty clearly indicated as to thread and the metric freewheel threads on smoothly and perfectly. Metric freewheels are too small in diameter to thread onto BSC or ISO hubs very far. So, it's a metric hub, appears to be original, and all indications are it's a 77.
My '78 Peugeot PR10 has a French thread Normandy hub, but it was a home market bike brought over by a French guy. I've got an English thread Normandy hub, and thought of changing it, because the biggest French freewheel I found is 28t.

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Old 01-09-20, 04:26 PM
  #86  
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I can't blame the French bike industry for going fully metric. At the time, it did look as if the world was going to go fully metric (except with bearing balls) so why not get a head start? It was a bet, and they lost. As for why different countries have different standards, it's because there was less international trade and interchange, so one had to develop standards. It wasn't until around 1967 that Sweden started driving on the right side of the road. So I guess there wasn't even much international driving in Scandinavia? Standards evolve, and part of that is that acceptance grows over time.
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Old 01-09-20, 05:03 PM
  #87  
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Originally Posted by Slightspeed View Post
My '78 Peugeot PR10 has a French thread Normandy hub, but it was a home market bike brought over by a French guy. I've got an English thread Normandy hub, and thought of changing it, because the biggest French freewheel I found is 28t.
My Grand Record is clearly a US market bike with 27" Super Champion rims. The TA crank has 14 mm pedal threads and the fixed cup is marked TA and FG and I verified that when I took it apart. I didn't measure the steerer threads nor the diamater of the stem/bars. It has a Stronglight Competition headset and a Philippe stem and bars and my wag is that they're metric also. The freewheel and the pedal thread are the only things annoying me so far. The pedals are some cheap copies of NR pedals and they are horribe. SIFEM is what's marked on them. I seem to remember finding out that they were made in Spain, but can't recall. Guess they were cheaper to source than the Atom 700s that they had used in prior years.

I have a PR10, I think a 72, and it had tubular Super Champion Record rims laced to Normandy Sport hubs and the rear is metric. Everything I've looked at on that bike has been metric.
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Old 01-09-20, 05:13 PM
  #88  
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Originally Posted by Lascauxcaveman View Post
It's love, Jeff; embrace it. We want you to get a touring bike so you can come dive into the sublime joys of gravel with us.
Well, I have been methodically working on a complete transformation of the Casati in recent months. I was able to handle the gravel of Cino '14 with the Colnago Mexico, which has tighter clearances, so I think the Casati will be able to out-perform it with the changes in kit I have/will have. Not only is that my 'experimentation' bike, it's also pegged for two different (but dedicated) wheelsets and two different RD setups depending upon the expected terrain of a given ride. So you see, I already have my bike - I'm only needing to tweak it.

I guess I'm a bit of an uncommon C&V guy when it comes to meaning what I say, tho. I do truly mean, for example, that the Bianchi I bought this past summer was my last bike. Well, unless I lose every bike I own tomorrow - then I'd have to get another bike ASAP. But really, I can make what I need out of what I have now in the way of frames, wheels and parts. I simply can't think of anything I need/want bicycle-wise, so now I can enjoy riding and working on them all the more. It is nice to have finally filled my personal bike niche - calming, even

DD
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Old 01-09-20, 05:18 PM
  #89  
desconhecido
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Originally Posted by noglider View Post
I can't blame the French bike industry for going fully metric. At the time, it did look as if the world was going to go fully metric (except with bearing balls) so why not get a head start? It was a bet, and they lost. As for why different countries have different standards, it's because there was less international trade and interchange, so one had to develop standards. It wasn't until around 1967 that Sweden started driving on the right side of the road. So I guess there wasn't even much international driving in Scandinavia? Standards evolve, and part of that is that acceptance grows over time.
The French have long taken pride in the metric system because, I've always thought, they sort of invented it. God knows how the Italians ended up with the mess that they did. 10mm x 26 tpi, for example. What's up with that? A pretty sharp guy who used to post to the forum said it was because after WWII most of the tooling the Italians could acquire was inch based and/or Whitworth. Anyway, the French seem to have been committed to a coherent/consistent system with deep cultural roots and that most all other nations had adopted for most everything.
No, they shouldn't be blamed, they tried to do the right thing. Doesn't make it any easier to find decent pedals for a TA crank with 14mm thread, though. I know what the solution is -- I have a set of 9/16" pedal taps and not very much metal needs to be removed. I'll probably end up doing it but it might require that I change my name to Drew.
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Old 01-09-20, 05:30 PM
  #90  
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Originally Posted by base2 View Post
Well, maybe you've never unded up upside down in a cedar tree with a bike on top of you after flying off the neighbors retaining wall at the bottom of a hill when you were 14 years old. But if you had, you would understand why they are over-rated garbage.

And the pads I refer to are those little hard rectangular blocks about an inch long by about a quarter inch wide. Usually made of dried out black rubber from 1973 or so. You might have seen 'em...Like normal brake pads for cantilever or linear pull brakes but smaller & dumber...Sometimes you'll see columns of them presented on a tag-board card next to the cash register at the local bike shop. Horribly overpriced at a dollar-99 each. A total rip-off, I'm tellin' ya.

I have centerpulls on 2 of my bikes (Wiennman on the International and Dia Comp on the Univega). They both work quite well.

But my Trek has dual pivots which are twice as good...
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Old 01-09-20, 05:34 PM
  #91  
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...my under sized garage and bank account.
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Old 01-09-20, 05:44 PM
  #92  
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Schwinns!
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Old 01-09-20, 06:20 PM
  #93  
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Originally Posted by desconhecido View Post
...but it might require that I change my name to Drew.
Glad to see this hasn't been forgotten

-Kurt
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Old 01-09-20, 07:11 PM
  #94  
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Narrow handlebars
Lack of bottle cage bosses - 2 pair for racing, 3 for touring
Seat post diameters all over the place
Uneven brake bridge height (looking at you, P15 Paramounts and Trek 710/716s!)
Single pivot side pull calipers
Special seat post binder bolts
Pre-standardized down tube shifter bosses
Non-sprung RD anchor bolts (not helping a general lack of chain tension possessed by older RDs)
Canti posts too narrow
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Old 01-09-20, 08:20 PM
  #95  
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Narrow handlebars. Thats the only thing I can think of. And I really like finding all the unique handlebar bends in 40cm+. Only thing is so few bars were brand labeled or embossed. So I have no idea who the maker was of some of the bars I really like.

In regards to the french stuff. I seek out french bikes. Peugeot, Gitane, Jeunet, really wonderful bikes. Rarely do I find french threaded hub/freewheels. The ubiquitous Pivo stems are on most french bikes. And the Stronglight, Simplex, Mafac component combo works just great on any 70's french frame. Pretty simple stuff, and sort of standardized in their own way. Most of my bikes have some kind of Simplex delrin derailleur. I love 'em. And french threaded Lyotard pedals are the standard for rattrap pedals. Embrace it, dont fight it.
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Old 01-10-20, 05:14 AM
  #96  
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Originally Posted by Chr0m0ly View Post
Lack of tire clearence, and that I keep having to replace 23/25mm tires with 28/32mm (if they fit(with fenders))!

No faceplates on quill stems!

Old brake pads.

Narrow bars.

Going over a possible purchase and finding frame damage.

Going over a recent purchase at home, and THEN finding frame damage. 😧

Shippers who put a bike in a box without any padding or securing. At. All.

THIEVES.

Not having met any BF members in the Chicago area before moving to NYC.

Deciding which are keepers and which to move on, when they have all basically reached pet status.
100% on all but one of the above!
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Old 01-10-20, 06:07 AM
  #97  
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Please don't discard those narrow handlebars. No one will be making more and some of us love them.
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Old 01-10-20, 07:42 AM
  #98  
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The weight. Especially when in carry it to my room upstair
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Old 01-10-20, 08:28 AM
  #99  
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Originally Posted by Chuckk View Post
To me, vintage bikes are like people. They're all different, some are more enjoyable than others, but they are what they are.
My experience with customers' resistance when flipping bikes:
Originally TOE CLIPS frightened them all. I finally started taking them off and giving them if they asked.
Then resistance moved on to NON-SIS shifters, then to DOWN TUBE shifters.
Now, GOTTA HAVE FAT TIRES! No, 42's aren't going to fit that Cannondale R900 - go buy an old hybrid!

Interestingly enough as much as I hate toe clips, I actually love down tube shifters . Of course I think they work better for some than others and it really depends on how much you shift. Nothing like a 2x10 drive train and down tube shifters though . It's a nice setup
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Old 01-10-20, 08:42 AM
  #100  
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There just isn't much I don't like. I enjoy the full variety of tire widths. Skinny and supple at the right pressure feels great! Fatties over the rough stuff is awesome!

Downtube shifters? Right on. Bar ends? Got 'em. Brifters? Yeah, baby!

Campy NR over a 14-24 block? Love it! Suntour long cage/14-28 or 32? Sweet!

Straight parallelogram, drop, slant - yes, please.

Centerpulls, sidepulls, single pivot, dual pivot - with the best pads and housings I haven't found any that don't work. Consumables have come a long way. That I love.

Aero cables, non-aero - both are nice.

Steel cranks, cottered, ashtabula, alloy - fine by me.

They all work as I propel myself down the road. I can't remember the last time a bike ride failed to put a smile on my face, and I ride an old U folder with drop bars for local errands.

I love bikes. That is all.
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