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Do you love what you do?

Old 02-02-15, 03:55 PM
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bici_mania
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Do you love what you do?

I don't. I don't hate it, but I don't love it and most of the time the effect leaves me miserable. I fantasize about doing something that I love and enjoy.

I am unsure how to make a transition to something else without interrupting the supply of food, water and shelter of those who depend on me.

If you transitioned from a job you 'don't love' to a job you do, how did you do it? What challenges did you face? What do you know now that you wished you knew then?
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Old 02-02-15, 04:00 PM
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More than I did a few weeks ago. And things are only looking up...I started a new job. Do I love it? No. But I do find it considerably more interesting. I should say that the new job is at the same employer, so no loss of vacation. Although I did take a slight pay cut. I should've got off my arse and got the required education ten years ago. Me was the only thing holding me back. No regrets.

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Old 02-02-15, 04:04 PM
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Sometimes. Sometimes not.

I try to find the most interesting/fun parts of a job then stick my nose in where it don't always belong. But I also figure I have to do chores sometimes. Somebody's got to do them. And if you ignore chores just to have fun it's hard to hang on to the job. Somewhere there's a balance in there.
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Old 02-02-15, 05:04 PM
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I was an auto mechanic for 30 years and mostly enjoyed it. In the past several years I started to get injured repeatedly and my last injury was the straw that broke the camels back (I am recovering from surgery to trim and re attach a torn bicep tendon) during my time off with the injury I tried selling insurance (hated it!) and selling service in dealerships (major stress) I have decided to get my vocational ed teaching credential while I recover and hopefully I will be teaching at the high school level shortly and or junior college auto programs. Changing careers at 50 with a mortgage etc is scary. It helps to have a bit of reserve banked, but that can go quick.
I consider teaching to be my retirement ymmv
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Old 02-02-15, 05:37 PM
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Yes. I'm retired.
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Old 02-02-15, 05:43 PM
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Originally Posted by bici_mania View Post
I don't. I don't hate it, but I don't love it and most of the time the effect leaves me miserable. I fantasize about doing something that I love and enjoy.

I am unsure how to make a transition to something else without interrupting the supply of food, water and shelter of those who depend on me.

If you transitioned from a job you 'don't love' to a job you do, how did you do it? What challenges did you face? What do you know now that you wished you knew then?

Go online and find your local colleges, universities, and even community courses. Browse through all their courses. This can be a bit time consuming, but also eye-opening. How do you feel when you read each course title and description? If your first reaction is along the lines of "Ugh - No!", then you've ruled out that choice. But if you're reaction is along the lines of "Oh that looks interesting" ... than that's a possibility.

Once you've gone through them all, go through the interesting choices again and think about think about several things:

Can you see yourself doing that over the next few years? If welding, for example, sparks your interest ... can you see yourself in a welding environment ... is that something you would feel comfortable with?

Are there job opportunities in that field? A class on Egyptian Pharaohs might look interesting ... but is that something which could get you a job? If you live in an area with lots of museums and want to work in a museum ... maybe ...

Will the course provide you with transferable skills ... skills you can use in your current position or in several other positions? For example, getting your heavy rigid truck driving licence (or whatever it is called in your area) might provide you with the opportunity to do some deliveries as a part of your current job, but could also open up the possibliity of getting on with a company doing short or medium haul work ... or work in agriculture ... or construction ...

And of course ... how much time, money, and effort will be required to get the training? Will your current employer let you take a bit of time off to get the training? Will they pay for it? Will you have to take the training on evenings or weekends? Will the training be worth it if you have to take 4 or 6 years of night classes to acquire the qualification?
I have had employers pay for courses and also give me time to take courses ... but the catch is that the courses have to be somehow applicable to my current position.

One additional thing ... anytime my current employers offer any sort of training, I take it. First Aid training ... you bet! A morning going through the new features of the latest version of Microsoft Office ... I'm there! The opportunity to take an online course providing an overview of Project Management ... sign me up! For one thing, it makes the job more interesting to take a break from the usual and do one of these courses. But I can also tuck them away for future reference ... and perhaps build on them as desired.


Oh, and also save, save, save. Tuck away as much money as you can into a savings account. Transitioning from one area to another is so much easier when you've got a nest egg to support yourself for at least a couple months.

Last edited by Machka; 02-02-15 at 06:33 PM.
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Old 02-02-15, 05:53 PM
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Yes, I love what I do. 35 years of working in or managing marinas and other waterfront assets. I can't imagine going to a job I didn't like. It would seem like work.

I told two people that I was looking at careers in other fields and they both laughed and said I wouldn't last a month inland.
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Old 02-02-15, 07:05 PM
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I had a career with a prestigious camera manufacturer. Loved it. Loved representing the product, most of he people I worked with, contacts with the customers.

Digital imaging and the internet changed the model and I was given a generous package to go away.

I thought "I'm only 50 y.o. with a great track record, computer savvy (thanks to all the training for digital imaging) so I be snapped up in a heartbeat!" Boy, was I wrong.

I tried selling business phone systems, got a Commercial Driver's License and drove freight over-the-road, became a rentarep (one day I am the "Sony" rep today I am the LG rep) really unhappy, under employed, under paid and suicidal.

Floundering.

Then I discovered on-line freelance market places. I struggled at first, taking what I could and learning what I could do, the tools I needed and NOT screwing up. Now I am making good money, enjoying my work and being satisfied in my life through work. I love being validated as competent, dependable and working with other smart people.
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Old 02-02-15, 07:30 PM
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Another suggestion ...

Think back over your employment history. Have you enjoyed jobs in the past ... or is being generally unhappy with your employment a bit of a pattern for you? I'm not saying it is, I'm just suggesting that's something to think about. If you're the one who is unhappy, is there anything you can do to improve your situation, even a little bit? Can you think of anything positive about your current position?

If you have had a job, or jobs, at some point that you enjoyed, what are some features of that job, or jobs, that you liked? That might give you a hint about what you might try to change in your current position, or focus on for a future position.


Also ... it is really easy to look at another person's job and think that's the life you want, but the situation could be a whole lot different if you actually got into that job yourself. So ... what about volunteering in an area that interests you, to help, but also to get a better idea what it's all about?
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Old 02-02-15, 07:49 PM
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I'm kind of in the same boat. I can't recall having a job I didn't hate eventually, but I actually like my current job well enough. I certainly don't enjoy going to work, but for once I don't actually hate it. But there are problems with it. For one, the pay is very low. Low enough that I basically have to be car free to live comfortably. Secondly, the job is physically demanding. I stand for eight or more hours every day, lift heavy things, and often time inhale things that probably aren't good for me. Third, I can't say the job is fulfilling at all. But I love where I live and I love the people I work with, so I'm also not unsatisfied with my life right now.

Originally Posted by Machka View Post
Go online and find your local colleges, universities, and even community courses. Browse through all their courses. This can be a bit time consuming, but also eye-opening. How do you feel when you read each course title and description? If your first reaction is along the lines of "Ugh - No!", then you've ruled out that choice. But if you're reaction is along the lines of "Oh that looks interesting" ... than that's a possibility.
I have done this a few times as I debate going back to school, but inevitably nothing I see looks particularly interesting to me. At least not interesting enough for me to take on a ton of debt for. So currently I'm in the same boat I was when I went to college right after high school; nothing intrigues me enough to call it my major. Another concern is that I'm not sure I could focus on school while also working, especially working full time, but I doubt I could afford to go to school without working.
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Old 02-02-15, 08:21 PM
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Originally Posted by Lamplight View Post
I have done this a few times as I debate going back to school, but inevitably nothing I see looks particularly interesting to me. At least not interesting enough for me to take on a ton of debt for. So currently I'm in the same boat I was when I went to college right after high school; nothing intrigues me enough to call it my major. Another concern is that I'm not sure I could focus on school while also working, especially working full time, but I doubt I could afford to go to school without working.
Not all courses require a huge time commitment or would incur a large debt.

Our local "skills" college, for example, offers short courses in a variety of subjects.
Short Courses - TasTAFE TasTAFE

Responsible Serving of Alcohol is one of the short courses, and is a requirement if you're going to try to acquire work in a licenced restaurant or pub. It is a 1-day course which can be done during the day, during an evening, or online. And it costs $95.

Forklift is another of the short courses, and is often a requirement or a desireable qualification for many different jobs in warehousing, construction, agriculture, etc. etc. It is a 3-day course and is a little bit pricey at $710, but could be worth it if it meant a better position.


Our state library offers community courses. I picked up MYOB, taught once a week over 10 weeks (IIRC), in the evenings, and costing about $200. That course was just an overview, but now if I were to apply for a job that mentioned some familiarity with MYOB (and several bookkeeping/receptionist-type jobs do ask for that), I could say that was true of me ... I do have some familiarity with MYOB. I was working full-time when I took that course ... it really wasn't that time consuming.


Sometimes it helps to browse the Employment Ads and see what types of jobs are out there. There could be something similar to what you're doing, but with slightly better pay IF you have this or that extra qualification.
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Old 02-02-15, 08:33 PM
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I am retired now. I bicycle and do various chords and yard work around the house. I sometime run errands or other tasks. I found that I had already discovered my "life's calling" as a child. Although I wasted nearly a half a century making a living.... just to earn my way back to where I started.

I never particularly hated work or my career. But I never found pleasure in my efforts at earning a living ether. Some do. Some of us don't.
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Old 02-02-15, 08:34 PM
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Yea. I'm a leisure pursuits specialist. (that's retired)
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Old 02-02-15, 08:54 PM
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Originally Posted by Machka View Post
Not all courses require a huge time commitment or would incur a large debt.

Our local "skills" college, for example, offers short courses in a variety of subjects.
Short Courses - TasTAFE TasTAFE

Responsible Serving of Alcohol is one of the short courses, and is a requirement if you're going to try to acquire work in a licenced restaurant or pub. It is a 1-day course which can be done during the day, during an evening, or online. And it costs $95.

Forklift is another of the short courses, and is often a requirement or a desireable qualification for many different jobs in warehousing, construction, agriculture, etc. etc. It is a 3-day course and is a little bit pricey at $710, but could be worth it if it meant a better position.


Our state library offers community courses. I picked up MYOB, taught once a week over 10 weeks (IIRC), in the evenings, and costing about $200. That course was just an overview, but now if I were to apply for a job that mentioned some familiarity with MYOB (and several bookkeeping/receptionist-type jobs do ask for that), I could say that was true of me ... I do have some familiarity with MYOB. I was working full-time when I took that course ... it really wasn't that time consuming.


Sometimes it helps to browse the Employment Ads and see what types of jobs are out there. There could be something similar to what you're doing, but with slightly better pay IF you have this or that extra qualification.
I realize there are cheaper educational opportunities, but none of those classes interest me. I actually took a two year course in drafting at my local tech school and even enjoyed it, but once I was on the job I hated it. In fact I consider that the worst job I ever had. Then I went to a truck driving school and got my CDL. Again, somewhat enjoyed the training but despised the actual work once I got a job. Maybe those experiences are another reason I'm hesitant to go back to school. I'm terrified that I'd go $50,000+ into debt and wind up hating my career. I guess for now I should be content with my life. I live in a beautiful place, my job isn't half bad and my coworkers are awesome, and I'm not living in poverty or anything. It seems like there's just this push from society that if I haven't graduated from college and/or make decent money that I'm not ambitious enough.

P.S. I actually have a LOT of forklift experience! I've been working in warehouses for over ten years.
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Old 02-02-15, 11:42 PM
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I have a job. I'm happy twice a day: when I arrive and when I leave.
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Old 02-03-15, 12:47 AM
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I'm a lowly mechanic... Boat tecnically but i will fix anything with an engine. I will never be rich. This is not a fall back Career. I did not choose this cause i was too dumb for law school. I love my job. I take pride in my work. I wake up happy to head into the shop everyday. If not for me and those like me... The world would grind to a under lubricated stop. Nothing would move without our knowledge, sweat and willingness to go home smelling like burnt gear oil.

Think about this the next time the check engine light in your Audi comes on.
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Old 02-03-15, 05:11 AM
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Originally Posted by Lamplight View Post
I realize there are cheaper educational opportunities, but none of those classes interest me. I actually took a two year course in drafting at my local tech school and even enjoyed it, but once I was on the job I hated it. In fact I consider that the worst job I ever had. Then I went to a truck driving school and got my CDL. Again, somewhat enjoyed the training but despised the actual work once I got a job. Maybe those experiences are another reason I'm hesitant to go back to school. I'm terrified that I'd go $50,000+ into debt and wind up hating my career. I guess for now I should be content with my life. I live in a beautiful place, my job isn't half bad and my coworkers are awesome, and I'm not living in poverty or anything. It seems like there's just this push from society that if I haven't graduated from college and/or make decent money that I'm not ambitious enough.

P.S. I actually have a LOT of forklift experience! I've been working in warehouses for over ten years.
I think you have put your finger on the key things that can make anyone happy in their work. But having awesome coworkers is the icing on the cake. They can really make a hell of a difference to how much anyone looks forward to going to work.
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Old 02-03-15, 05:15 AM
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I have a great job, I am very well paid for it, and I do love it. I have done this for closing in on a decade now and am growing kinda bored. The problem is, even when "better" more challenging jobs open, I hate to leave this one.
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Old 02-03-15, 07:17 AM
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I do love my job(s). I get to be creative, produce something of value and working with my hands is therapeutic. That said, I'm working toward changing my employment to working for myself. A bit late in life perhaps, but I've never been in the position to do so before with family obligations, etc.
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Old 02-03-15, 08:27 AM
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yep, I love my job. The day I quit loving it is the day I quit doing it, but then again I am old, no longer have to work, so my love for the job is my only reason to do it.
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Old 02-03-15, 08:36 AM
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During my working career, I wound up doing a job at which I was very good, but did not love.
Although this was achieved entirely by accident, it was the way I wanted it.
The career was the means by which I supported my family; it was not an aversion.
Although my mind was sometimes on my job even while I was at home or elsewhere. I was glad to leave it at the
end of the day and have evenings and weekends free for my family and other endeavors.

Now I am retired, and love it !!
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Old 02-03-15, 08:48 AM
  #22  
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I worked a job I hated for a long time because I needed the money to support a lifestyle which included too much debt. Never let yourself get in this situation. Manage your expenses so that if you had to leave your job or it disappeared, you'd be OK short term. I'd worked in a publishing company in many different positions -- the job I got tired of was production management, the job I hated was editor.

They moved that job to the other coast, and thankfully, I could not follow it. So I got in a completely different field -- meat cutting. Which was something I'd done before and a skill I was happy to have when I couldn't find another publishing gig. Loved working with my hands again, and even enjoyed the retail environment. Not an ideal situation, not the best money.

Then another publishing gig came up, contract work that paid outrageous money, so I took it... and hated it. Again. But it sure paid the bills. Eventually, I got fed up and just quit. Only job I'd ever quit suddenly. I vowed never to get back into publishing.

And then I got into the bicycle industry as a mechanic. Again, work I liked, but even less pay than meat cutting. I did take the opportunity to do some welding courses, learning a new skill. But not being able to contribute toward paying household expenses in a meaningful way was a drag. So eventually, while rounding up references, when a former publishing boss offered my old production gig back to me, except less work and more pay, I jumped at it.

In the meantime, life does what it does, and I ended up severely downsizing my life and lifestyle. To the point where I could work a job I loved -- bike mechanic -- and get by. Except now, I'm making twice as much and not hating it. A lot of it has to do with the fact that I could walk away from it today and be just fine until some better situation came along. And even now, I keep a toe in the water by working PT in a bike shop, in season.

Bottom line: I don't love what I do, but I don't hate it. The money is great and will go toward a future where I can do what I love, while at the same time, I downscaled my lifestyle to a point that doing what I love could support it. And in the meantime... I'm currently taking a machine shop course through a local Makerspace.

I don't particularly love what I do as my primary job/career, but as a whole, I am happy with where I'm at in life right now.
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Old 02-03-15, 11:21 AM
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Yes.
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Old 02-03-15, 11:30 AM
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I love what I do. And I'm very happy with what I do. Though there are days where it's not so great. I call those my 'paycheck days'. The days I earn my paycheck. The rest of the time I can't believe I'm getting paid. Of course I don't get paid a lot. And with my level of education (4 years undergrad + 4 years graduate school + continuing education every single year) I could get paid a LOT more in a LOT of other fields. So it's always a tradeoff. Just how MUCH food, warmth, and shelter do you need?

My stepdad just made this transition. Actually stayed in his field; but made the jump to a company whose environment was just a lot better. Even managed to finagle it so that he started 6 weeks after he resigned from his previous post; which gave him (and I) time to renovate and rehab the house he and my mother live in. We had a lot of fun doing that and it was a good 'vacation' for him. Of course, he's also nearly 50, lives well below his means (When the last of us kids moved out they downsized to a little split-level they bought at a foreclosure auction for cash. They have very little regular monthly expenses.) And he's got a nest egg built up, good investments and a solid retirement. So he could afford to take several weeks 'off'. Now he's a lot happier in this new position. Ironically, it started out as a pay cut, but it quickly resulted in a new position that pays just a little bit more than his previous employer did. So it worked out really well! But even now, he's toying with some entrepreneurial ideas or looking at other companies.

Quality of life and happiness is important. We've gotta work. And we get paid for a reason (because we wouldn't do it for free). If there's a skill you think you could be passionate about; get that skill. Whether that's becoming an attorney or an auto mechanic or a professional garbage truck driver. Otherwise, just keep your options open, your head held high and your outlook positive. Jobs do suck sometimes. That's why they pay us to do them.
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Old 02-03-15, 11:32 AM
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That's a tricky question, this is my second career and I can say honestly that I prefer it to the first. But... The whole reason I went into law is I wanted to help people and when I do it's great, but there's also a lot of paper pushing and a lot of politics and suchI don't care for.
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