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What is Your End Goal?

Old 11-11-20, 10:03 PM
  #26  
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Sometimes I think I know, then it all gets shot to heckll.
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Old 11-11-20, 10:28 PM
  #27  
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In the last couple of years, my fleet has definitely shifted towards more modern rides, and the C&V stuff approaches wall-hanger status. I don’t know if that means I’ll sell of that end of the fleet (though I’ve sold a bunch this year), and I’m sure I’ll continue to tinker with old bikes, but we shall see.
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Old 11-11-20, 10:33 PM
  #28  
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This period of time for me, particularly this last month, has been one of 'distilling' as far as bikes and components go. I suppose my end goal is to obtain, via purchase of an existing frameset or having one built, one bike to be the sole focus of a build and then riding for forever. I have pretty much the whole thing built in my mind (or in CAD) in either road/race form or touring. I'd much rather find an 'off the peg' frameset and go about building that up as it's almost always considerably cheaper, and finding good frames for good prices is how I've done things (and it's turned out well). The custom route is not to be special, but simply to put all my favorite frame elements into a beautifully lugged frame with my desired seat tube length and reach (among other things).

My '74 Paramount is my sole ride at present, and I'd love the thing to be simply a 66 to 67cm version of itself, transplanting the top tube onto a newly-located upper head lug and seat cluster, with a new head tube, seat tube, and seat stays. And steerer. Assuming the whole world doesn't laugh at that halfway-to-Ship-of-Theseus idea, it's a lot of work, but it's a worthy frame. Bottle cage bosses would be added, as well as DT shifter bosses, a pump peg, and top tube cable guides. I wouldn't dare ask @gugie to do this as much of the chrome is in great shape, and he has already won a prolonged battle in replacing the steerer while saving the chrome.

So for now, I'll just show a rendering of a road bike I built with the specs and features I have in mind, plus custom and custom-inspired lugs (that I designed). 73°/74° HT/ST, 40mm fork rake with a gentle bend, 62mm of trail, fully sloping crown, 67cm CTT, and a 58.0 or 58.5cm (I forget! ) TT. Short reach calipers easily accommodate a 28mm tire front and rear.



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Old 11-12-20, 12:15 AM
  #29  
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That is a very pretty and very seriously fast looking bike.

I've ended up in the black with this hobby as I have resuscitated some left for dead fine riding bicycles and reluctantly moved them along. I'm in the process of getting back to the three bikes I had when I came here looking for help fixing a bike that became vintage while I was riding it. As I sell each bike now, I immediately spend the money putting together a brazing kit. I don't trust myself to save for it because I have a problem buying old bikes. I have a torch and tips now, and hoses are on the way. Three more bikes should get me the rest and maybe enough steel for my first frame.
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Old 11-12-20, 12:37 AM
  #30  
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Originally Posted by RiddleOfSteel View Post
This period of time for me, particularly this last month, has been one of 'distilling' as far as bikes and components go. I suppose my end goal is to obtain, via purchase of an existing frameset or having one built, one bike to be the sole focus of a build and then riding for forever. I have pretty much the whole thing built in my mind (or in CAD) in either road/race form or touring. I'd much rather find an 'off the peg' frameset and go about building that up as it's almost always considerably cheaper, and finding good frames for good prices is how I've done things (and it's turned out well). The custom route is not to be special, but simply to put all my favorite frame elements into a beautifully lugged frame with my desired seat tube length and reach (among other things).

My '74 Paramount is my sole ride at present, and I'd love the thing to be simply a 66 to 67cm version of itself, transplanting the top tube onto a newly-located upper head lug and seat cluster, with a new head tube, seat tube, and seat stays. And steerer. Assuming the whole world doesn't laugh at that halfway-to-Ship-of-Theseus idea, it's a lot of work, but it's a worthy frame. Bottle cage bosses would be added, as well as DT shifter bosses, a pump peg, and top tube cable guides. I wouldn't dare ask @gugie to do this as much of the chrome is in great shape, and he has already won a prolonged battle in replacing the steerer while saving the chrome.

So for now, I'll just show a rendering of a road bike I built with the specs and features I have in mind, plus custom and custom-inspired lugs (that I designed). 73°/74° HT/ST, 40mm fork rake with a gentle bend, 62mm of trail, fully sloping crown, 67cm CTT, and a 58.0 or 58.5cm (I forget! ) TT. Short reach calipers easily accommodate a 28mm tire front and rear.



Do it, if it all goes according to plan and you get lucky like I did, it is worth every damn penny, regardless of how many of them it was/is.
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Old 11-12-20, 01:00 AM
  #31  
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End goal, no idea, until then, bike boom icon's, coveted customs, and a made for me new custom, all done at this point.

Just need to keep going with more and more selective acquisitions, yea right!
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Old 11-12-20, 02:04 AM
  #32  
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Keep riding as long as I can. Oh and what with shop backlogs..., to get a second bike because 1 is none and 2 is one.

_
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Old 11-12-20, 03:38 AM
  #33  
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Am I crazy?
In the same way that I am? Yes! But crazy in a good way, unless, but unless is another story if the collecting turns into hoarding...


When I first go interested in vintage road bicycles, I too wanted to organize my collecting habit. All. Italian. Or English. Or French. Or one of each. Or racing. Or touring. Or whatever and there are many many whatevers.

What I have since learned is that, as at least one other forum member has put it, it is the hunt that is fun and the find the rewarding fix. Yes, collecting vintage road bikes, for me at the very least, had/has become an addiction. These days, however, I hunt for what I find - never for a specific anything. You might ask why..?

If I had chosen to restrict my buying decisions, I never would have come up with this top or the line and rare German steed...


And, if I wanted only top of the line steeds, I would not be accurately restoring this entry level Italian bike right now, knowing that the ride quality will be more than satisfying (this is Torpado number nine for me, I think)...


If, as suggested, you decide to collect only bikes with Columbus top of the line tube sets, they you better have a LOT of storage room. My guess is that there are hundreds of such bikes and each one a wee bit different from the others.

So, collect away and enjoy yourself but try not to be too, or even a bit, restrictive. Collecting only what you want might mean passing on something like this...


Why on Earth would anyone pass on something that looks like the above picture just because it is (somewhat) unknown, made from ordinary tubing or pipe, is not top of the line or anything like it. But the old Skyway was fun to find (actually took less than five minutes to find this one). It was fun to build. And the ride quality? Well, now that is another story and I ended up donating this one to Bicycles for Humanity...
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Old 11-12-20, 06:25 AM
  #34  
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For me it is about the journey and the exploration of myself. There is a part of me, big part, that wants to be free. Free to go in what ever direction curiosity tugs at me. To survive, some of that needs to be curbed. I need a break to chase that curiosity. All of what I chase tends to be mechanically oriented, some would say intensely mechanical, but that is a relative term. For most of us, bicycles are simple, elegant, machines with a touch of art. To others they are complex and look alike.

From a bicycle perspective, I started out with a French bike because it was what I had. I bought it because it had Campagnolo parts, which in the late 60's and early 70's was the best. That stuck really hard, more like brazing or even welding itself to my perspectives.

When the Motobecane was taken out of service by a car, I had already joined BF and was learning a lot about what I had and what became important to me along with intensified curiosity. There is no substitute for experience so you gotta get bikes that will address some of the curiosity. Colnago was a brand that was discussed a lot at the time.

I found one, in Hood River OR of all places, slightly smaller than I should have purchased but close enough. After healing (physical) from the loss of the Le Champion, I was shocked at the ride of the Colnago. SOLD! Ok so now the pursuit became Italian.

However, a move across country was required to stay employed. Needed a bike so found a '84 Trek 610. Then it was learning about Treks. Then a Pinarello showed up, then a Trek 760, then a folding bike, then a 73 Bottecchia, then a Masi Gran Corsa with a Burley Duet, then another Pinarello, then a 2010 Langster (FG/SS), then a De Rosa.

Point is that there is not a long term goal only curiosity with discovery and opportunity. I have learned and tested my likes and dislikes with ever evolving perspective. A fun ride both physically and mentally. I hope it can continue. Even with being an introvert, an engineer trait, I have enjoyed the people on the journey with most of them being on this forum.
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Old 11-12-20, 06:43 AM
  #35  
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Originally Posted by BlueDevil63 View Post
But seriously...

Obviously don't overstretch finances or relationships but otherwise whatever floats your boat. I have had various themes (panto, drillium, chrome head lugs, countries, brands). In the end I just ended up with a small core of what I just think are beautiful bikes and then just keep moving bikes through because I like to work on them, like to look at them, but then am alright with passing them on (I take a bunch of pictures of every bike).
and you have had a handsome parade pass through your shop.

by just happenstance I have now gathered a number of the bikes (sisterships) of what I owned when I was racing many decades ago.
I realize one to go- might find it.
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Old 11-12-20, 06:49 AM
  #36  
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If you are learning something, having fun, not hurting anybody else, and within your budget you have your direction on the correct setting. Bikes do that for me; as does grinding on rocks. Like steel bikes, rocks stay pretty for a long time until they are lost.
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Old 11-12-20, 06:51 AM
  #37  
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Originally Posted by RiddleOfSteel View Post
This period of time for me, particularly this last month, has been one of 'distilling' as far as bikes and components go. I suppose my end goal is to obtain, via purchase of an existing frameset or having one built, one bike to be the sole focus of a build and then riding for forever. I have pretty much the whole thing built in my mind (or in CAD) in either road/race form or touring. I'd much rather find an 'off the peg' frameset and go about building that up as it's almost always considerably cheaper, and finding good frames for good prices is how I've done things (and it's turned out well). The custom route is not to be special, but simply to put all my favorite frame elements into a beautifully lugged frame with my desired seat tube length and reach (among other things).

My '74 Paramount is my sole ride at present, and I'd love the thing to be simply a 66 to 67cm version of itself, transplanting the top tube onto a newly-located upper head lug and seat cluster, with a new head tube, seat tube, and seat stays. And steerer. Assuming the whole world doesn't laugh at that halfway-to-Ship-of-Theseus idea, it's a lot of work, but it's a worthy frame. Bottle cage bosses would be added, as well as DT shifter bosses, a pump peg, and top tube cable guides. I wouldn't dare ask @gugie to do this as much of the chrome is in great shape, and he has already won a prolonged battle in replacing the steerer while saving the chrome.

So for now, I'll just show a rendering of a road bike I built with the specs and features I have in mind, plus custom and custom-inspired lugs (that I designed). 73°/74° HT/ST, 40mm fork rake with a gentle bend, 62mm of trail, fully sloping crown, 67cm CTT, and a 58.0 or 58.5cm (I forget! ) TT. Short reach calipers easily accommodate a 28mm tire front and rear.



very comprehensive CAD work! Those extended chainstay spigots are not featured in the images but should be.

what program(s)?

the builder might wish to nudge the seat binder bolt up a bit.
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Old 11-12-20, 06:58 AM
  #38  
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This is going to sound like something that someone would say at the Thanksgiving table.

Its funny how I read some of these posts and realize that just because I have been doing this for 50+ years, I still don't know crap about crap. I've had cheap bikes and expensive bikes. A few come and go, and a few remain. I have no sentimental attachments to any bike, but I hold all of my bikes in high regard. I recognize each individual bike for what it is, and I am grateful to have my bikes in my life. As long as I continue to have bikes and bike people in my life, then I am happy. That's MY end-game.
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Old 11-12-20, 07:52 AM
  #39  
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I have never thought that there would be a final group of bikes that I would consider the end game. I have always hovered around 5 or 6 bikes because that is all I can manage to maintain and still ride them all. That 5 or 6 has changed dramatically from 10 years ago and may be different 10 years from now. Maybe the end game for me is that they all keep me interested in riding and excited every day I get to ride a bike that I chose every component and assembled myself.
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Old 11-12-20, 09:00 AM
  #40  
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I do not consider myself a bicycle collector and never have been. The vast majority of bicycles that I've owned were purchased to be ridden, mainly in competition. While some 2nd hand bicycles occasionally find their way to me, I don't actively seek them out. There is no list of grail bicycles. Since the competitive phase of my life is over, there is no end game, other than to dispose of the bicycles before I die, so that my son is not burdened with the task. However, due to the associated memories of people and events, this will be a painful process.

I can definitely relate to member gomango and the fishing gear problem, which will be a much bigger logistical issue for me than the bicycles. Then there is the stereo equipment, camera equipment and electric trains.
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Old 11-12-20, 09:42 AM
  #41  
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I'd like to own a pink 3Rensho at some point. (It likely wouldn't be an endpoint, but it's my only real C&V "goal.")
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Old 11-12-20, 10:22 AM
  #42  
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I am not too far from stable stasis, or so I tell myself. My Vincitore custom road fixed-gear is a keeper and the first among equals in the stable. The beat Gitane TdF is its lieutenant, ready for rides and vacation trips where its ratty condition hides its superb riding qualities. The Mercian Colorado may someday get a full rebuild, but it's a keeper for sentimental reasons, being the first bike I rode after my bypass surgery - and it just handles beautifully. The '76 Puch Royal X was the bike of my youth, lost and then found decades later, and is also a keeper. The '73 Raleigh Competition with the Dingle fixed-gear drive and the repainted '73 Gran Sport are also keepers, because I know I always need at least one bike for mad scientist experimentation and tinkering and fettling. Finally, the rattle-canned '74 Allegro just rides so well, it's a keeper too.

Perhaps I will restore my vintage British cycling publications collection - I liquidated it when times were tight and the kids were younger. Maybe some day I will actually set up a 650b conversion. I could certainly stand to dispose of the old French gaspipe, but perhaps I will settle for just finding them good homes.

I say all this and know that sooner or later some battered but lovely old bike in my size will come along ...
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Old 11-12-20, 10:25 AM
  #43  
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Thanks again everyone for these great contributions.

I see the "journey" and "thrill of the hunt" themes coming up often, and I can certainly relate to that. I've been fortunate enough to have been on quite a few journeys in my life, both spiritual and physical, and based on a lot of reactions here I'm getting the impression that many of us will always be on some type of sub-journey or another as we move along that big journey that is life. And sometimes it's nice to be among likeminded people, as I certainly get the impression that there are lots of journey-less souls out there (perhaps more of them than there are of us), which sort of baffle me to some degree, as I'm sure we baffle them with our 'strange' habits and hobbies.

And the thrill of the hunt is indeed a very real phenomenon, and quite intoxicating. Some knowledge of Italy and Italian, combined with access to easy logistical means through work, has extended my hunting range into new territories, hence the search for some form of direction or organization for the process.

Originally Posted by USAZorro View Post
I'm thinking of gardening and woodworking... and perhaps trying my hand at building a kayak or canoe.
Just be careful where you build your boat. I remember looking at houses with my wife and hearing about a guy that meticulously built a boat in his basement, only to realize he couldn't actually fit it out of the house. Boats and canoes are great though, and definitely have a similar 'zen' factor to bikes and cycling.

Originally Posted by Drillium Dude View Post
Currently I'm looking into taking instruction in watchmaking.
I hung out on the watchuseek forums briefly, and even dipped a toe in the water, but it wasn't for me. Making watches sounds intriguing, but a lot of the collectors didn't seem like my type of people (if you know what I mean), and there wasn't any exercise involved.

Originally Posted by Kilroy1988 View Post
As I learn more about my favorite time and place in cycling history (post-war Britain) I've found that it's just as important for me to be collecting and reading period literature, ranging from company brochures to weekly magazines to maintenance books, as it is to gather parts and build actual bikes.
This is an interesting approach that I hadn't really considered. I like it.

Originally Posted by gios View Post
Oh and what with shop backlogs..., to get a second bike because 1 is none and 2 is one.
If your one bike is that Gios, then it just might be enough.

Originally Posted by T-Mar View Post
Since the competitive phase of my life is over, there is no end game...
Can I ask where you turn to now as an outlet for your competitive drive? Or has it just diminished to tolerable levels?
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Old 11-12-20, 11:05 AM
  #44  
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Originally Posted by robertorolfo View Post
...

Just be careful where you build your boat. I remember looking at houses with my wife and hearing about a guy that meticulously built a boat in his basement, only to realize he couldn't actually fit it out of the house. Boats and canoes are great though, and definitely have a similar 'zen' factor to bikes and cycling.

...
I know someone who built an airplane in his basement. From the start he had a plan to get it out, but that plan required opening a hole in one wall of the basement. His story actually got local news coverage.

I would not have to resort to such extreme measures to construct a kayak or canoe. After the patio under the back deck gets paved, I'll have a 12 x 20 outdoor project space that has some shelter (all good as long as this doesn't become a long-term home of a construction site.
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Old 11-12-20, 11:55 AM
  #45  
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Good question. You made me think. Most of the time I don't have an end goal. I'll pick something up because it was inexpensive or free. I only work on it if I learn from it. One good example is a 1992 Schwinn World that turned out to be a better bike than I would have thought and was an early Taiwanese import for Schwinn. A bad learning experience that I had was a Huffy Cranbrook. I though at least I could use some parts. The only thing I saved were the fenders and they haven't gone on a bike.

I am always on the lookout for something interesting.

If I sell them I usually put more money into the bike than I should or sell it for less than I should. But this is my hobby not my business. So, if I can make a cyclist happy great. One more vintage bike on the road, hopefully being enjoyed.
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Old 11-12-20, 12:04 PM
  #46  
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Originally Posted by USAZorro View Post
I know someone who built an airplane in his basement. From the start he had a plan to get it out, but that plan required opening a hole in one wall of the basement. His story actually got local news coverage...

That's a modern take on an old Buster Keaton gag from his 1921 silent short film, The Boat. Buster builds his dram boat, the Damfino (pronounced Damn If I Know) in the basement of his house, then realizes it's too tall for the door. He enlarges the door by removing some overhead bricks then pulls the boat out with his car. However, he doesn't realize that the boat is also too wide for the opening and in the process of pulling it put, most of the basement wall collapses. Just after he gets the boat out, the entire house collapses from the weakened basement wall. It's a great gag from what is arguably one of the greatest comedy shorts of all time.
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Old 11-12-20, 12:14 PM
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Hi, For me my goal has changed. AT first I was collecting bicycles that were nostalgic to me. I worked in a shop growing up so the bikes I purchased brought back good memories. Now. I'm up to 38 classics and I changed my focus a bit.

First, I'm building a small bicycle museum that people can visit. I want a good clean example of those nostalgic bicycles but I am also adding in the "dream bikes" from the 70s and 80s I wish I could of purchased way back when.

I keep thinking I dont need 2 1973 World Voyageurs or even the third to get all three colors offered but I dont have the incentive to sell one of them. Pretty crazy.

The truth is there is no rhyme or reason why people collect. Usually we get the things that we always admired or made us feel a certain way.

Best to you!

JJ
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Old 11-12-20, 12:33 PM
  #48  
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Originally Posted by robertorolfo View Post
...Can I ask where you turn to now as an outlet for your competitive drive? Or has it just diminished to tolerable levels?

Unfortunately, there isn't one at the present time. I used to coach competitive cycling but the local cycling club disbanded over what they considered excessive heavy handedness from the governing body. After that, I was an assistant coach with the local track & field club and lived vicariously through my son who was an international calibre rower. However, he eventually decided that it was smarter to finish his education and pursue a career, around which time I started photographing sporting events, primarily rowing, track & field and duathlons/triathlons. However, I don't even have those opportunities this year, due to Covid-19 cancellations. My wife particularly liked going to the rowing regattas and supporting the crews from my son's old university. She was devastated when the RCH and CURC regattas were cancelled this year.
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Old 11-12-20, 12:42 PM
  #49  
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No long term goals for me. I've only just finished working on my second bike (first one was back in early 2000's) and it was a real learning experience. The two main reasons for this recent build are 1) I had some fun-money from selling my dual-suspension MTB that I'd not ridden in over a year, and 2) I'd been looking for a townie bike I didn't need to worry about locking up in public. After seeing a number of other folx online (including a few here) producing some cool resto-mods of 90's MTBs that's the route I took.
Personally I feel like I'd rather spend any free-time riding one of my three bikes that working on another bike. However with COVID-19, the amount of free-time I have increased significantly so that was less of a concern. Now with winter setting in, my riding time will likely decrease for the next few months so, I'll have some time to rebuild a 91 Rocky Mountain Fusion for my son as he's almost outgrown the 24" wheeled bike he's currently on.
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Old 11-12-20, 12:45 PM
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My goals are basically here:

- Ride every bike I've ever wanted to, and also try to ride anything I've never heard of just to see what appeals to me here & now
- Hang out with, discuss, and share my resources (knowledge, camaraderie, parts) with other like-minded folks and help out where I can
- Do my best to keep less than 8 complete bikes at one time and never step outside my allotted parts/slush fund, ever, period
- Never get too hooked on restoring to 100% OEM, it's not practical, can be a waste of time, especially when I know better options exist
- Always sell to other BF'ers at the best possible price I can muster (or free if I can manage) especially if it'll help one of my French-loving pals finish something

In a way it sometimes feels like I'm chasing that 'perfect fit' and I've found a couple damn good ones along the way. But more important than that, I've met some damn awesome folks on here who I now talk to outside the forum, and they often check-in periodically if they don't see me posting.

Good time, especially as we approach our US Thanksgiving holiday, to say "Thanks" to all of my fellow BF'ers here. There's a lot of good souls on here, and that's pretty unusual for the many corners of the internet.
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