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comfort zone of riding?

Old 12-05-20, 11:53 AM
  #26  
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We got slammed Tuesday with over a foot of wet, heavy snow. Lots of road salt. No bike riding on the roads for me until that is washed away in the Spring!

BITD, when I was in school, my Sears three-speed rusted through in just four years from me riding it through Winters. I detail-stripped it at least twice each Winter to repack bearings and pour 90wt oil through the frame to try to prevent rust, all to no avail... The toptube broke near the welded joint at the seat tube. Had it welded and it broke again next to the weld less than two weeks later - just too thin due to rust.
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Old 12-05-20, 12:08 PM
  #27  
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I hate the heat

I guess it depends on where you live but it doesn't get that cold here. Summers are suffocating, I'm already dreading the summer.
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Old 12-05-20, 12:24 PM
  #28  
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Interesting. I've never had any salt problems with my bike since I switched to a German aluminum bike with drum brakes and internal gears. On the other hand, I've found that road salt is a major destroyer of cars -- enough so that I never drive when roads are wet and salty. Years ago, roads were not salted and people just used tire chains, which worked fine.
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Old 12-05-20, 12:31 PM
  #29  
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Originally Posted by CargoDane View Post
Your bike won't die from a little salt - be it dissolved in water or suspended in snow/slush. If you're worried, you can rinse it with some fresh water at home after the day. There is no need to ride on the sidewalk just because there is salt on the road. It's not acid.
Unless, of course, you ride an unpainted/unlacquered steel bike, you want to keep it absolutely mint and it's your only bike that is really only a sunny afternoon bike.
My bike did not "die" from riding a winter of salted roads, but it really did a number on my drivetrain and brakes. This is with full coverage fenders. I did more maintenance to my bike that spring than I usually do in several years.

For many people, rising the bike off is not practical, as when it is below freezing out you will need:
a) either a place indoors to rinse it, or store a hose inside (where it will not freeze) that you then take out each time you rinse off the bike
and
b) somewhere above freezing that will allow the bike to dry off and not freeze the water.

I'll still ride on salty roads if I need to commute (rare the past few years, as I work from home now) but I am only taking my old commuter bike with pretty low end parts. No way I am riding any of my nicer bikes.

That has been my experience, anyway.
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Old 12-05-20, 12:41 PM
  #30  
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I've become less tolerant of cold, as I've been in my senior years. Really don't enjoy "bundling" up for a bike ride in cooler weather. Like it 15 degrees warmer than I used to, before I find the ride enjoyable. Just one of the things I'm less tolerant of--now, GET OFF MY LAWN!! PS--I find off-road more enjoyable than on road in cooler weather--the exertion of trail riding takes away the need to bundle up.
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Old 12-05-20, 12:47 PM
  #31  
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Originally Posted by Kapusta View Post
My bike did not "die" from riding a winter of salted roads, but it really did a number on my drivetrain and brakes. This is with full coverage fenders. I did more maintenance to my bike that spring than I usually do in several years.

For many people, rising the bike off is not practical, as when it is below freezing out you will need:
a) either a place indoors to rinse it, or store a hose inside (where it will not freeze) that you then take out each time you rinse off the bike
and
b) somewhere above freezing that will allow the bike to dry off and not freeze the water.

I'll still ride on salty roads if I need to commute (rare the past few years, as I work from home now) but I am only taking my old commuter bike with pretty low end parts. No way I am riding any of my nicer bikes.

That has been my experience, anyway.
A bucket will do. Pour it over. Job done. Fortunately, my brakes are hydraulic. But ,anyway, I have my bikes to use them, regardless of the weather. If it's a rough winter, so be it. It's still way less maintenance and cost - and way more practical - than a car.
I don't have "good weather bikes".
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Old 12-05-20, 12:50 PM
  #32  
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California boy here and it's my first winter commuting full time (50 mile round trip 4 x a week), but the temps when I set out are low 40's.
I love it! A little cold for the first 5 miles but once I'm warmed up I'm good. Wear a merino long sleeve base layer up top with a wind jacket and padded liners with "hybrid" pants over them down below. Wool socks and full finger gloves to keep the digits from going numb.
My hats off to you snow riders!
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Old 12-05-20, 12:55 PM
  #33  
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Originally Posted by CargoDane View Post
A bucket will do. Pour it over. Job done. Fortunately, my brakes are hydraulic. But ,anyway, I have my bikes to use them, regardless of the weather. If it's a rough winter, so be it. It's still way less maintenance and cost - and way more practical - than a car.
I don't have "good weather bikes".
One bucket of water poured over the bike is not going to do it. Sure, you can do it with a bucket and water, but you are going to need to use a brush of something, and all this is f-ing miserable when it is 22 degrees out. I know this from experience.

And you still need someplace above freezing for the bike to dry out, or at least not freeze up.

I did not say not to ride, just being realistic about the realities of riding in the salt. Some places use a lot of salt, and that salty water and slush can be hell on some parts.

Sure there are ways to mediate this: IGH, belt drive, better sealed braking system, but most people are not riding belt-driven IGHs.

Last edited by Kapusta; 12-05-20 at 01:00 PM.
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Old 12-05-20, 01:09 PM
  #34  
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Originally Posted by Kapusta View Post
One bucket of water poured over the bike is not going to do it. Sure, you can do it with a bucket and water, but you are going to need to use a brush of something, and all this is f-ing miserable when it is 22 degrees out. I know this from experience.

And you still need someplace above freezing for the bike to dry out, or at least not freeze up.

I did not say not to ride, just being realistic about the realities of riding in the salt. Some places use a lot of salt, and that salty water and such can be hell on some parts.

Sure there are ways to mediate this: IGH, belt drive, better sealed braking system, but most people are not riding belt-driven IGHs.
Unless there are pockets of water standing on/in your frame/gear cables/whatever where it freezes and expands, breaking stuff, there is no reason your bike can't survive having frozen water on it. It's a bike. It's a rugged and simple machine.

Okay, I get it: You don't want to rinse it off, you don't want to spend time, money, or energy on end-of-season maintenance and you don't want to have a bike that is good for salty winter riding. Yet you complain about your good-weather-only bikes demanding end-of-season maintenance when used in inclement weather, and you "having to" use a cheap beater bike for winter (which also needs maintenance).

Personally, I don't even rinse off my bikes in winter. I maintain them when they need it. This is one of the reasons I don't like derailleur bikes and steel bikes. As I mentioned previously: I don't do good-weather-only bikes as they are not at all practical.

I also believe it to be rather pointless to have good bikes but when commuting whenever the weather is bad, you have to make do with a cheap, poor-quality bike. That would soon have me take the bus, train, or car.
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Old 12-05-20, 02:23 PM
  #35  
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A dedicated winter bike has a number of practical uses for me, besides protecting the other bikes from road salt. For one thing, I only have one pair of studded tires, and those tires won't fit on all of my bikes. It's convenient and practical to leave them mounted on one pair of wheels, on one bike. As a practical matter, the ice season nearly coincides with the road salt season.

Not vital, but convenient. Take anything involving bikes, like switching from snow to summer tires, and multiply by the four members of my family. We literally have four winter bikes, that reside under cover in the back yard during the summer.

The winter bike has some other convenience features, mostly defined by the contents of my parts bin: The shifter is easy to operate while wearing heavy mittens. Fender clearance isn't generous, but sufficient. The bike has a chain guard. And so forth.

I don't actually believe that steel frames are necessarily a problem if you care for them, which takes minimal effort. That's the one thing that I haven't worried about. The Schwinn electro-forged frame is steel, coated with a thick protective layer of... steel. My tolerance for quality is... it has to fit, and it has to work.

But I certainly respect other approaches. The nice thing about a web forum is that you get a smorgasbord of ideas to choose from. And I consider those ideas as my bike fleet evolves over time, but nothing happens overnight. For instance, my bikes are what they are, but I wouldn't build up a new bike that wasn't compatible with winter riding, even if I continued to maintain a dedicated winter bike.
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Old 12-05-20, 02:30 PM
  #36  
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Originally Posted by Doohickie View Post
Try a Buff or one of the loose masks. Works for me.
Tried a buff, balaclava, scarf around my mouth and nose. I'm too snotty on bad days. Those things got nasty. I usually take two or three surgical masks and replace 'em as they get wet.

It's not as bad now after my docs changed my inhalers, and I eliminated some stuff from my diet that was causing problems. Alas, that stuff included beer and milk. I still have a beer once in awhile, maybe once a month, but it still causes sinus congestion and my eyes swell.
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Old 12-05-20, 02:31 PM
  #37  
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By the way, is CargoDane in reference to Dane County, or Denmark?
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Old 12-05-20, 02:34 PM
  #38  
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Originally Posted by Gresp15C View Post
By the way, is CargoDane in reference to Dane County, or Denmark?
Denmark - the country, not Denmark, South Carolina
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Old 12-05-20, 02:56 PM
  #39  
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Originally Posted by CargoDane View Post
Denmark - the country, not Denmark, South Carolina
That's cool. I live in Dane County, Wisconsin.
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Old 12-05-20, 03:24 PM
  #40  
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The driver that helps churning the miles in the cold has a little bit to do with the experiment of what it takes to be that successful ride. Successful definitely is a ymmv to each person, as the success can be achieving the good mood feeling* , maintaining the exercising during the harder times, or just to enjoy freedom by getting out & riding* all while being comfortable*

The * is how I determine successful.
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Old 12-05-20, 08:03 PM
  #41  
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Originally Posted by CargoDane View Post
Unless there are pockets of water standing on/in your frame/gear cables/whatever where it freezes and expands, breaking stuff, there is no reason your bike can't survive having frozen water on it. It's a bike. It's a rugged and simple machine.
The issue is not the freezing water breaking stuff. The issue is freezing up and interfering with the shifting and braking. I am speaking from experience with this.

Originally Posted by CargoDane View Post
Okay, I get it: You don't want to rinse it off, you don't want to spend time, money, or energy on end-of-season maintenance and you don't want to have a bike that is good for salty winter riding. Yet you complain about your good-weather-only bikes demanding end-of-season maintenance when used in inclement weather, and you "having to" use a cheap beater bike for winter (which also needs maintenance).
Wow. You might ask yourself this: If you find it necessary to misrepresent what I have said in order to make your point, you probably need to be reconsidering your point to start with. I said none of what is in bold above, nor is any of it true. At best It is twisted and embelished versions of what I said, combined with unfounded assumptions. I'm not going to bother responding point by point.

Look, you made a point about salt and bikes without thinking it through first. I just pointed out that it does not always work the way you say it does and backed it up with explanation and personal experience. You should have just let it go. But instead you double down, and end up writing the above nonsense.... which does not even address the point we were discussing..

Originally Posted by CargoDane View Post
Personally, I don't even rinse off my bikes in winter. I maintain them when they need it. This is one of the reasons I don't like derailleur bikes and steel bikes. As I mentioned previously: I don't do good-weather-only bikes as they are not at all practical.

I also believe it to be rather pointless to have good bikes but when commuting whenever the weather is bad, you have to make do with a cheap, poor-quality bike. That would soon have me take the bus, train, or car.
That great, do what you like. I really don't care, it has nothing to do with me.

This point of this thread was for people to discuss when and if they stop riding during the year. To come in and tell people they are doing it wrong is in really poor taste.

Last edited by Kapusta; 12-06-20 at 06:41 AM.
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Old 12-06-20, 10:47 AM
  #42  
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My temp range goes from 60 to 100 degrees.
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Old 12-06-20, 12:15 PM
  #43  
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My comfort zone? 60-80F, but I'll ride +/- 20 of that.
I draw the line at snow now that I don't have to ride in it.
Heck, I don't like to ride in the rain any more, either. I won't set out on a ride if it is raining, or a more than 70% chance of my getting wet.
Winds? I prefer less than 15mph, but will ride in 25mph if I must.
Darkness - not if I can help it! My riding season (for my work commute) is dependent on the sunrise - the sun must be above the horizon at the start of my commute. Too many half-asleep drivers otherwise. AND I use my rear blinky. I have a cheap low-intensity front blinky on the one bike - just so half-asleep drivers see me. Before I had that, I had a driver pull out in front of me when I was within 30' - I damned near broadsided him - he claimed he never saw me even though he looked right at me... So now I use the blinky to call attention to myself. That blinky is NOT a headlight on flash-mode. It is ~maybe 25 lum at best.
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Old 12-06-20, 12:44 PM
  #44  
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When I moved to the Portland area after living most of my life in the midwest, I immediately noticed the lack of rusty cars. Yesterday I saw a Ford Pinto, beat to heck with paint worn down to bare metal, but not rusty. Amazing. Now we have people who clamoring for salt on the roads. They have no idea. Please no.

In normal times, I'd be obsessing about which bike to set up with studded tires, triple-checking the forecast daily, have a drying rack set up in the garage, and constantly searching online for even better rain gear. Such is the life of a year-round commuter in this climate. But now, working from home, I'm relegated to responding to threads like this. <sigh>.

To make up for the lost clarity that normally would come from my daily commute, I am getting out more on weeknights and weekends. Mixing up the road bike, MTB, commuter for errands, coffeeneuring challenge, and some unicycling. It's okay.
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