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Thermally insulated bicycle flask

Old 02-06-20, 09:17 AM
  #1  
Mosyosalyangoz
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Thermally insulated bicycle flask

Thermal Bike Water Bottle
It is designed for cyclists who want to keep their drinks cold or hot.
Featuring a protective cover for the mouthpiece and a heat-insulating layer, this bike bottle keeps your drinks hot or cold for a long time.

• CAPACITY: 450 ml
• HEAT INSULATION: Thanks to its heat-insulating layer, it keeps the liquid in it warm / cold.
• ERGONOMIC CLUTCH: The cover can be opened and closed easily and fits in the hand.
• COMPATIBILITY: Compatible with all flasks on the market.
• WARRANTY: 2 Years
• HEAT INSULATION FEATURE: It prevents the beverage at 5 ° C -15 ° C temperature from heating at 20 ° C outdoor temperature for 3 hours.
• MATERIAL MAINTENANCE: Clean thoroughly after each use. If you have filled isotonic drinks, wash the body, cap and tip of the flask thoroughly, making sure that no residue is left inside. Use dish soap and a long brush to properly clean the inside of the bottle.
Then let it dry and do not cover it so it can breathe. Otherwise, moisture may form inside. Do not wash in the dishwasher at temperatures above 70 ° C.

COMPONENTS
BODY BODY:
66.00% Polyethylene, 34.00% Low Density Polyethylene (LDPE)
• COVER
100.00% Polypropylene
• EXTERIOR COATING:
100.00% Polyethylene Terephthalate (PET)
• FOAM:
100.00% Polyethylene
• BOTTLE MOUTH:
66.60% Thermoplastic Polyethylene (TPE), 33.40% Polyethylene
• STORAGE RECOMMENDATION: Keep the flask with the mouth open.
• WARNINGS: Do not use with microwave and fatty drinks (oil, milk).

PHOTOS OF THE PRODUCT






In the video, I talked about user reviews and features.

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Old 02-06-20, 12:36 PM
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450 ml is about 1 pint. For many that's not enough fluid to carry to worry about its temperature.
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Old 02-06-20, 01:43 PM
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i agree
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Old 02-06-20, 07:00 PM
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I tried an insulated bottle once. Riding in temps over 100 degrees, pretty useless unless I was going to drink it in the first 5 miles of a 40 mile ride. My wife insisted on an insulated bottle (camelback Podium?). After a couple of rides she tossed it. Well, she didn't toss them, they're sitting in the cupboard collecting dust.

Heck, some rides I use so much water that no way would one bottle get me through anyway. There have been times that I'm happy if some dude watering his lawn lets me use his water hose!

BTW, that little cap would bug the snot out of me!
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Old 02-06-20, 09:13 PM
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These are what I use to keep my water (or other fluids) cold on a long ride on a hot and humid day. Nice icy cold water even after many hours. I use them to hold the water and I pour some from it into the plastic bottle in the handlebar cage mount. Unfortunately in winter they don't keep fluids hot for more than an hour or so.



Cheers
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Old 02-06-20, 09:16 PM
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Originally Posted by TheDudeIsHere View Post
I tried an insulated bottle once. Riding in temps over 100 degrees, pretty useless unless I was going to drink it in the first 5 miles of a 40 mile ride. My wife insisted on an insulated bottle (camelback Podium?). After a couple of rides she tossed it. Well, she didn't toss them, they're sitting in the cupboard collecting dust.

Heck, some rides I use so much water that no way would one bottle get me through anyway. There have been times that I'm happy if some dude watering his lawn lets me use his water hose!

BTW, that little cap would bug the snot out of me!
CAUTION! Make sure the water hose is NOT connected to fertilizer. I asked a guy who had just come out of his house if I could refill my bottles from his hose. He told me no, because the hose was connected to a fertilizer tank.

I know you asked first. However do not ever use a hose without asking permission. You just don't know what might be in the water.

Cheers
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Old 02-06-20, 09:50 PM
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Originally Posted by TheDudeIsHere View Post
I tried an insulated bottle once. Riding in temps over 100 degrees, pretty useless unless I was going to drink it in the first 5 miles of a 40 mile ride. My wife insisted on an insulated bottle (camelback Podium?). After a couple of rides she tossed it. Well, she didn't toss them, they're sitting in the cupboard collecting dust.

Heck, some rides I use so much water that no way would one bottle get me through anyway. There have been times that I'm happy if some dude watering his lawn lets me use his water hose!

BTW, that little cap would bug the snot out of me!
On a hot summer day, a Polar Insulated bottle that has been frozen until the water is solid ice the night before has a fighting chance of still being cool in the third hour of a ride.
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Old 02-06-20, 09:59 PM
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Fifteen ounces seems really small. Even the Camelbak Podium Ice-- which will keep ice for ~6 hours in 100º temps-- holds 21oz. And umm... "It prevents the beverage at 5 ° C -15 ° C temperature from heating at 20 ° C outdoor temperature for 3 hours." That's 68º.

In my summer riding (during which rides typically take place between 90-105º,) the regular Podium Big Chill bottles (25oz) will still have ice after ~3 hours.

The Polar bottles (not including the newer nanotech ones, with which I have no experience) don't stay cold nearly as long as the Camelbak.
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Old 02-06-20, 10:05 PM
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I like the Contigo brand stainless bottles.
They have standard size bottles up to 20 oz or 24 oz.
A couple of different types of spouts, but most of the new ones have an auto push-button open.
Good shape that fits in most bottle cages quite well.

I've tried a couple of different spouts, and am not sure which one is "the best".



A little rattling in certain metal cages. Choose a bottle with raw stainless and not a fancy color.

Most of them will work with hot or cold drinks, and the heat retention is 2x or 3x better than the plastic bottles that I've used.
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Old 02-06-20, 10:59 PM
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Originally Posted by Miele Man View Post
CAUTION! Make sure the water hose is NOT connected to fertilizer. I asked a guy who had just come out of his house if I could refill my bottles from his hose. He told me no, because the hose was connected to a fertilizer tank.

I know you asked first. However do not ever use a hose without asking permission. You just don't know what might be in the water.

Cheers

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Old 02-06-20, 11:02 PM
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Originally Posted by john m flores View Post
On a hot summer day, a Polar Insulated bottle that has been frozen until the water is solid ice the night before has a fighting chance of still being cool in the third hour of a ride.

I'm sure everyone is different. But my usual 45 miler is 2 1/2 hours and I go through maybe 4 to 5 bottles of water. By the time I get to my third hour, I'm done.

Plus, I'd have to carry a third bottle to keep that one cold. Just doesn't work for me.

If I were doing a century, I'd have to carry that one frozen bottle somewhere else cause I'd be on my third bottle of water well before the 3rd hour.
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Old 02-06-20, 11:03 PM
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Without even the risk of fertilizer, consider that the consumer availability of hoses for potable water is very, very small. There's a tag on almost every hose in the Lowe's or the Home Depot stating "not for drinking." Lord only knows what's in the Chinese vinyl, and there's for sure lead in the brass. If you have to get yard water, take off the hose and get it straight from the spigot.
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Old 02-06-20, 11:11 PM
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Originally Posted by TheDudeIsHere View Post
I tried an insulated bottle once. Riding in temps over 100 degrees, pretty useless unless I was going to drink it in the first 5 miles of a 40 mile ride.
I live in the hot and humid Southeast, and while I don't ride when it's 100 anymore, I'll ride when it's 90 and 90 percent humidity. The insulated bottles work. I cram as many ice cubes as I can in a bottle, and fill it up halfway, and stick it in the freezer the night before I ride. The next morning before riding, fill the rest of the bottle with water.

I generally drink a 24/27oz bottle every hour when it's hot, and when prepping the bottles as I've described, the second bottle will still be above room temperature when I finish it. The first bottle will be cold to cool before it's finished. Well worth the effort. Remember that you need to have heat transfer to melt the ice - i.e., if you freeze the whole bottle, it will take a while for the ice to melt, but if there's liquid in the bottle, that will help melt the ice.
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Old 02-06-20, 11:25 PM
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Originally Posted by Rogerogeroge View Post
Remember that you need to have heat transfer to melt the ice - i.e., if you freeze the whole bottle, it will take a while for the ice to melt, but if there's liquid in the bottle, that will help melt the ice.
So that is the trick? I myself won't use them but my wife has. Once she froze the entire insulated bottle. Not too hot outside but some of the ice melted to water leaving her a big blob of useless iceberg in the bottle.
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Old 02-06-20, 11:34 PM
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Also, keep your beverages cold until you're ready to ride. If you stick the bottles in your cages on the bike on the car rack and it's still 30 minutes before you ride, you'll get a head start warming up your water. Luckily for me, my friends and I almost always have coolers with post ride refreshments, and that's a convenient place to put your water bottles before you ride. Before riding, water bottles go into the cages about the same time you put your helmet on. Also, you can use similar ice management when using a hydration pack.
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Old 02-06-20, 11:38 PM
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Originally Posted by TheDudeIsHere View Post
So that is the trick? I myself won't use them but my wife has. Once she froze the entire insulated bottle. Not too hot outside but some of the ice melted to water leaving her a big blob of useless iceberg in the bottle.
Then you obviously should use less ice the night before and more water the day of the ride. If you find yourself in this conundrum in the middle of the ride, find a water tap to fill the bottle with water or maybe a friend has second bottle that you can pour into yours. You could then give back some cold water before long. As I said, you gotta have water to melt the ice.
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Old 02-07-20, 12:58 AM
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Wide foot carries big bottle cages that carry insulated and non-insulated. 32, 40 & even 48 ounces.

Last edited by Gconan; 02-07-20 at 01:01 AM.
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Old 02-07-20, 08:32 AM
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LiterCage Fit Guide
The LiterCage stainless steel bottle cage fits most 3.5″ diameter bottles.
Listed below are products which our customers have seen success in carrying.

Aquatix:
40 oz Insulated*

Blackthorn:
32 oz Stainless Steel Wide Mouth*

DICK’S Sporting Goods:
32 oz Push Pull Water Bottle

Fifty/Fifty:
40 oz Stainless Steel Wide Mouth*

Hydro Flask:
32 oz / 40 oz Wide Mouth*

Kinzi:
32 oz Wide Mouth*

Kleen Kanteen:
40 oz Classic

MiiR:
32 oz Howler*

Mizu:
36 oz V12 Insulated Wide Mouth Bottle*

Mueller:
32 ounce Quart w. Push/Pull Cap

Nalgene:
32 oz – Wide Mouth / Narrow Mouth
48 oz – Wide Mouth / Narrow Mouth**
38 oz Stainless Steel*

Nathan:
24 oz DoubleShot
32 oz BigShot

Polar Bottle:
42 oz Insulated Bottle

Primus:
1.5L Fuel Bottle*

Note:
*Use of an additional strap is recommended for these oversized or metal bottles to eliminate any rattling.
**We recommend using 3-hole mounting bosses when carrying these larger bottles.
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Old 02-07-20, 09:27 AM
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For a 3 plus hour ride, my experience with the Polar bottles and the Camelbak Podium Ice bottles is that they're hardly worth the effort unless they've been frozen solid during summertime temps in the 80s or higher. If it's hot and we want cold water, our go-to solutions are freezing a hydration bladder 1/3 to 1/2 full and filling the remainder with liquid water or using a nalgene 32oz bottle filled with ice and water and using an Outdoor Products Water Bottle Parka. The enclosed bottle doesn't fit a normal cage though we do have one with a strap that will hold it in place. For us, those two methods provide us with cold / cool water for most of a day.
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Old 02-07-20, 09:44 AM
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FWIW, insulated Polar and Camelback bottles filled with ice and then water (or "drink") will keep the water cool for about two hours in 80s or higher. Beyond that time, and @honcho indicates, the liquid warms up. However, since my bikes have space for two bottles, and I need to drink at least one large bottle per hour at those temperatures, at the end of two hours they're empty (which is worse than warm!), so I'll find a place to refill them at that time.
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Old 02-10-20, 05:57 AM
  #21  
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Originally Posted by Rogerogeroge View Post
Then you obviously should use less ice the night before and more water the day of the ride. If you find yourself in this conundrum in the middle of the ride, find a water tap to fill the bottle with water or maybe a friend has second bottle that you can pour into yours. You could then give back some cold water before long. As I said, you gotta have water to melt the ice.
Originally Posted by Gconan View Post

Wide foot carries big bottle cages that carry insulated and non-insulated. 32, 40 & even 48 ounces.
Originally Posted by Gconan View Post
LiterCage Fit Guide
The LiterCage stainless steel bottle cage fits most 3.5″ diameter bottles.
Listed below are products which our customers have seen success in carrying.

Aquatix:
40 oz Insulated*

Blackthorn:
32 oz Stainless Steel Wide Mouth*

DICK’S Sporting Goods:
32 oz Push Pull Water Bottle

Fifty/Fifty:
40 oz Stainless Steel Wide Mouth*

Hydro Flask:
32 oz / 40 oz Wide Mouth*

Kinzi:
32 oz Wide Mouth*

Kleen Kanteen:
40 oz Classic

MiiR:
32 oz Howler*

Mizu:
36 oz V12 Insulated Wide Mouth Bottle*

Mueller:
32 ounce Quart w. Push/Pull Cap

Nalgene:
32 oz – Wide Mouth / Narrow Mouth
48 oz – Wide Mouth / Narrow Mouth**
38 oz Stainless Steel*

Nathan:
24 oz DoubleShot
32 oz BigShot

Polar Bottle:
42 oz Insulated Bottle

Primus:
1.5L Fuel Bottle*

Note:
*Use of an additional strap is recommended for these oversized or metal bottles to eliminate any rattling.
**We recommend using 3-hole mounting bosses when carrying these larger bottles.
Originally Posted by honcho View Post
For a 3 plus hour ride, my experience with the Polar bottles and the Camelbak Podium Ice bottles is that they're hardly worth the effort unless they've been frozen solid during summertime temps in the 80s or higher. If it's hot and we want cold water, our go-to solutions are freezing a hydration bladder 1/3 to 1/2 full and filling the remainder with liquid water or using a nalgene 32oz bottle filled with ice and water and using an Outdoor Products Water Bottle Parka. The enclosed bottle doesn't fit a normal cage though we do have one with a strap that will hold it in place. For us, those two methods provide us with cold / cool water for most of a day.
Originally Posted by pdlamb View Post
FWIW, insulated Polar and Camelback bottles filled with ice and then water (or "drink") will keep the water cool for about two hours in 80s or higher. Beyond that time, and @honcho indicates, the liquid warms up. However, since my bikes have space for two bottles, and I need to drink at least one large bottle per hour at those temperatures, at the end of two hours they're empty (which is worse than warm!), so I'll find a place to refill them at that time.
Thank you for comments.
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Old 02-10-20, 05:59 AM
  #22  
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Originally Posted by DrIsotope View Post
Fifteen ounces seems really small. Even the Camelbak Podium Ice-- which will keep ice for ~6 hours in 100º temps-- holds 21oz. And umm... "It prevents the beverage at 5 ° C -15 ° C temperature from heating at 20 ° C outdoor temperature for 3 hours." That's 68º.

In my summer riding (during which rides typically take place between 90-105º,) the regular Podium Big Chill bottles (25oz) will still have ice after ~3 hours.

The Polar bottles (not including the newer nanotech ones, with which I have no experience) don't stay cold nearly as long as the Camelbak.
Originally Posted by john m flores View Post
On a hot summer day, a Polar Insulated bottle that has been frozen until the water is solid ice the night before has a fighting chance of still being cool in the third hour of a ride.
Originally Posted by Miele Man View Post
CAUTION! Make sure the water hose is NOT connected to fertilizer. I asked a guy who had just come out of his house if I could refill my bottles from his hose. He told me no, because the hose was connected to a fertilizer tank.

I know you asked first. However do not ever use a hose without asking permission. You just don't know what might be in the water.

Cheers
Originally Posted by Miele Man View Post
These are what I use to keep my water (or other fluids) cold on a long ride on a hot and humid day. Nice icy cold water even after many hours. I use them to hold the water and I pour some from it into the plastic bottle in the handlebar cage mount. Unfortunately in winter they don't keep fluids hot for more than an hour or so.



Cheers
Originally Posted by TheDudeIsHere View Post
I tried an insulated bottle once. Riding in temps over 100 degrees, pretty useless unless I was going to drink it in the first 5 miles of a 40 mile ride. My wife insisted on an insulated bottle (camelback Podium?). After a couple of rides she tossed it. Well, she didn't toss them, they're sitting in the cupboard collecting dust.

Heck, some rides I use so much water that no way would one bottle get me through anyway. There have been times that I'm happy if some dude watering his lawn lets me use his water hose!

BTW, that little cap would bug the snot out of me!
Thank you for comments.
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Old 02-12-20, 09:20 AM
  #23  
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Excellent idea, just not enough room for water.....I get thirsty
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Old 02-13-20, 05:08 AM
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Originally Posted by Chad991 View Post
Excellent idea, just not enough room for water.....I get thirsty
unfortunately...
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Old 02-14-20, 12:26 PM
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Originally Posted by CliffordK View Post
I like the Contigo brand stainless bottles.
They have standard size bottles up to 20 oz or 24 oz.
A couple of different types of spouts, but most of the new ones have an auto push-button open.
Good shape that fits in most bottle cages quite well.

I've tried a couple of different spouts, and am not sure which one is "the best".



A little rattling in certain metal cages. Choose a bottle with raw stainless and not a fancy color.

Most of them will work with hot or cold drinks, and the heat retention is 2x or 3x better than the plastic bottles that I've used.
I have an iron flask and that thing made so much noise on one of my bikes with a metal cage I had to quit using it I guess I should just get me another bontrager that is made of something like plastic. Those metal bottles are a lot better than plastic.
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