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Long Distance Competition/Ultracycling, Randonneuring and Endurance Cycling Do you enjoy centuries, double centuries, brevets, randonnees, and 24-hour time trials? Share ride reports, and exchange training, equipment, and nutrition information specific to long distance cycling. This isn't for tours, this is for endurance events cycling

2020 Century-A-Month Club

Old 11-23-20, 08:21 AM
  #51  
CAT7RDR
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^^^^^^ Wow, that is really impressive! I was expecting some aero road bike with skinny tires. Looks like you were self-supported and comfy on your Surly.
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Old 11-23-20, 12:09 PM
  #52  
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Originally Posted by Cycletography View Post
Yesterday I completed my first double-century. What a fun day of cycling!!!
That's awesome! I have yet to do a double. You're fortunate to live in a place that's warm and flat; brings the goal a little more within reach of mortals.
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Old 11-24-20, 02:19 PM
  #53  
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Originally Posted by CAT7RDR View Post
^^^^^^ Wow, that is really impressive! I was expecting some aero road bike with skinny tires. Looks like you were self-supported and comfy on your Surly.
Thank you. Yes, the Surly is a very comfortable ride. And the Gilles Berthoud Aravis is an amazing saddle.

Originally Posted by Brett A View Post
That's awesome! I have yet to do a double. You're fortunate to live in a place that's warm and flat; brings the goal a little more within reach of mortals.
Yeah, if I lived in a state with lots of elevation this ride would have been much harder. It still wasn't easy; but like you said, the November weather and flat terrain in southwest Florida helped make it possible. At the end of the ride I was quite surprised to find that I had climbed 3,000 feet.
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Old 12-06-20, 07:56 AM
  #54  
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One hundred consecutive months of Century a Month complete! 172.5 km (on Strava) in Izu peninsula some 120 km west of Tokyo and also +24T (VeloViewer tiles).



A ride in west Izu in December is almost like a personal tradition for me. As the weather turns drier in the winter there are so many nice Fuji views to be had and you can ride around the entire peninsula without climbing a single hill higher than 300 m.

Well, that's the theory. But it actually rained for the first two hours and the return route through the center of the peninsula that I took to get back to Mishima had a climb to 650 m elevation and only 7 C in the dark. I had about 1000 m of elevation gain on the way down to near Iwachi Onsen (south of Matsuzaki), but another 1200 by replacing the hilly coastal road that I had come on with Rt15 and Amagi pass/Rt414 on the way back.



We meet up at 8:00 at Mishima station on the main bullet train line from Tokyo to Osaka. It had been raining on my drive on Tomei expressway from Tokyo, but seemed to almost have stopped by the time we set off, so I left my rain gear in the small backpack I was wearing. The rain picked up again, bringing back memories of my rainy 400 km Fleche ride from Aizu to Tokyo in mid-October. Our first stop was at a 7-11 convenience store on the Izu north coast, before we headed out to the NW corner.



The Honshu coast across the bay was completely obscured by rain clouds, no views of Mt Fuji. However, gradually the sky brightened and the rain stopped. We bought some satsuma oranges from an unattended roadside stall (9 for $3 yen) which we shared at a viewpoint overlooking Ita village.

First we could make out the side of the mountain, with snow visible at the top of the visible portion, just below the clouds. In Heda village we visited the sandspit with the shrine. In clear weather you can view Mt Fuji behind the entrance to the local bay with the tori (gate) of the shrine in the woods on the sandspit from a small pier the locals use for fishing. The water there is crystal clear.



Then we climbed the biggest hill on the way to Toi, where we had a Chinese lunch (because it was quick and December daylight is short). After that Jochem headed over the mountains to the center of the peninsula to catch a train back while Colin and I continued to Matsuzaki as fast as I could.

The rain had washed off all the chain lube and it was squeaking. I had to re-lube from my little container, which fixed it.



From Matsuzaki, Colin headed inland on Rt15 to get to Shimoda while I continued towards Iwachi onsen / Kumomi onsen. On a hill overlooking the Matsuzaki coast I took pictures when three Japanese road cyclists came up. We started to chat. In the end it turned out one lived in my neighbourhood and I had met with one of the others at a Half-Fast meeting a couple of years ago! There world is such a small place



Since I was running out of daylight, I headed back north and took the same route Colin had taken. From north of Shimoda I headed towards Amagi pass. My feet were wet the whole day from the rain, even though I had bought a simple pair of socks at a convenience store to change into, because the shoes were still wet. My fleece trousers were also moist from not wearing the rain pants in the morning. So I wasn't very comfortable, despite wearing the rain jacket as an extra layer. Dry feet are crucial for comfort and I resolved I will finally do something about keeping my shoes dry in the rain.

In one place the road passes a corkscrew-like ramp. The climb is very steady, mostly 5-7 %, so not difficult but just long. The road is kind of remote, with no houses around and I could hear many deer whistling in the forest, but cars were passing quite regularly. North of the tunnel at the top of Amagi pass it was a loooong descent. Once that leveled off I could follow the river and main roads back to Mishima, with no significant climbs.

I got back home around 01:00 in the morning, showered and went to bed. It felt good to have done the big ride for the month and extended the streak into the triple digits, which was my aim for the whole year. Izu is always well worth a visit.
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Old 12-07-20, 08:48 PM
  #55  
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It's hard to complain about December in Texas -- average temperatures usually settle between 50įF and 70įF; nonetheless, once you get used to the 90 degree days, 50 is downright chilly. Add in some heavy overcast and a light drizzle, and it's officially cold! Of course, the forecast was supposed to be dry...

If the weather wasn't enough, I deliberately chose to take the Salsa Vaya touring bike -- it is the most comfortable, but also the heaviest of my options. I never regret taking the Vaya (after the fact), but I always lament cranking up hills with a 22-tooth chainring (comfortable, and slow).

Starting out at 9am, it took until about 5pm. I would have taken longer too -- a longer lunch or a few extra stops -- but I wanted to be home before dark (and I succeeded).

With the cold and the drizzle and not stopping long for breaks, I managed one hundred miles without any new pictures. Nonetheless, it still means I finished at least one century each month for the last 12 months. We'll see if it happens again next year...
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Old 12-21-20, 12:48 PM
  #56  
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I've been using this thread as a motivator more than a place to report, but I have been keeping up with the promise I made to myself to do this. After a full year, Iíve come to more greatly appreciate how the 100-mile goal is somewhat arbitrary as it can mean different amounts and types of effort for different people. Riding 100 miles is very different for someone who lives in the snowy hills compared to someone who lives on the sunny coast for instance.

Here in rural New England, doing monthly centuries sometimes means keeping an eye on the weather forecast for days that are warm enough (at least in the upper 20ís Fahrenheit to start) and no snow or freezing rain. (BTW, It's gets into the mid/upper 90's with 90% humidity in the summer too -a 100 degree temperature range.)

And where I live, every ride promises fifty feet of climbing per-mile on average. Thatís a minimum of 5,000 feet for a century. (November was 7,200 feet)

For these reasons, I prioritize comfort over speed. Although I own a Specialized Roubaix -arguably the perfect bike for long rides when pace is a priority- I do these centuries on my touring bike; a forty-plus pound Surly Disc Trucker with 26x2Ē tires, geared down like a tractor to 15.7 gear inches. (This 22x36 gearing has me moving about 2.6 mph at an 80 rpm cadence.)

Iíve spent a fair amount of time living on this bike in recent years and I find itís comfortable for as many hours as there are in a day. I pack everything I think Iíll want for a 12+ hour outing. All the food I will need, 3.5 liters of water and a SteriPen to refill from streams, redundant lights, brick battery, gloves, hats, layers of clothing, music, etc.

Itís enjoyable in the same way a long road trip in the car is enjoyable. I sit, relax, and take in the scenery, not needing to be anywhere at any certain time, no computer, no emails, no one asking anything of me. Heaven.


October:
I procrastinated on my October century, and ended up doing it on the 31st It was 103 miles in temps below freezing. I didnít leave my house until 11 am because I wanted it to warm up at least into the upper 20ís. It was 27 when I left. It got up to 34 briefly in the afternoon, but it was back into the low 20ís by the time I got home around 2:30am. It was 111 miles, 5,300 feet of climbing. I didnít realize til I got home that I did not stop anywhere to go inside the whole time. I just ate and drank what I carried.











November:
I decided not to procrastinate on my November ride and managed to do it on a day with more agreeable temps. It was 112 miles with 7,200 feet of climbing with temps in the upper 40ís. It even nudged over 50 for a couple hours. Which, if youíre not from around here, means two light layers under a wind shell and you take your hat and gloves on and off thought out the day -not exactly warm, but plenty comfortable.




Peterborough, NH





December:

I closed the year with my December century a week ago on the 13th. It was the one day that was to get above freezing in a weeks-long stretch of our typical hard-frozen conditions. 103 miles, 6k feet of climbing in temps between 30 and 50 (we have little micro climates here in the rural New England)











I'm keeping the intention to do this going into the new year. It's a great way to maintain a base level of fitness and overall well being.
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Old 12-23-20, 10:57 AM
  #57  
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My last century of 2020 was a local event called the "Hilly Hundred". Keep in mind, this is Florida, so "hilly" is a matter of perspective ...100 miles, 3,773 ft. of climbing. Disregard my elevation numbers in the attachment. My Wahoo Elemnt Bolt was not even close to accurate with regard to elevation and is being replaced under warranty. My goal was to finish in under 7 hours, which I achieved (barely). The folks up front finished in 4 1/2 hours and when I made it to the finish line everyone had already packed up and gone home. Still, I'm proud of my effort. No excuses.

For 2020 as a whole I completed 31 century rides and 1 double century. Unfortunately, I failed to log a century ride in June, so I did not complete the 2020 century-a-month challenge. However, that leaves room for improvement in 2021.

Happy holidays to all. I wish eveyone a safe and happy new year!!! Cheers


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Old 02-07-21, 10:50 PM
  #58  
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Originally Posted by Brett A View Post
I haven't really been on a bike since finishing a 1k mile tour last October, so I did this century on the flattest course I could find; the rail trail system that runs through the college towns of Amherst and Northampton, Mass. It wasn't even 2k feet of climbing, whereas the flattest road lop I could put together would have been over 6k feet. If you do an out-and-back to all three terminus' (termini?) of the rail trails system, it's 53 miles. So I did it twice.
Wow! Back when I was trying to find any Century route I could safely accomplish, I considered doing exactly that (especially as I could refill in the middle) but wasn't sure I'd manage the repetitiveness of it.

I'm too slow and cold-averse to do centuries year round, but when I finally figured out that I could take Park Street south from the Easthampton trail down to Papermill to Union to Westfield, riding mostly on rail trail from Northampton down to Farmington CT, around the river loop through Collinsville and then back home again that became my habitual route in the summer months, very flat, with less repetition and only a few miles of sometimes busy road. I've been over that Mill River bridge both before sunrise and after sunset ;-)

Definitely intrigued by some of your rides into VT though; made it as far as Shelburne Falls in November but had to turn around with too few hours of daylight remaining, hope to be back up that way once the snow is gone.

Hoping this year to at least push the "century season" beyond the summer months.
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