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Heavy Rider - New Road bike - what should I know?

Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg) Looking to lose that spare tire? Ideal weight 200+? Frustrated being a large cyclist in a sport geared for the ultra-light? Learn about the bikes and parts that can take the abuse of a heavier cyclist, how to keep your body going while losing the weight, and get support from others who've been successful.

Heavy Rider - New Road bike - what should I know?

Old 05-02-19, 10:04 AM
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fat2fit
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Heavy Rider - New Road bike - what should I know?

Hi,

I just got my first road bike. I have been riding an entry level mountain bike but often found myself traveling on pavement most of the time and it really made me want to get a faster bike to commute around town. I found a used road bike in great shape and was a high-end bike at the time of it being brand new.

My bike is a 2014 Opus Allegro 3.0. It's full carbon with 21mm rims, and 20 spoke wheels front and rear. I've ridden it around for about an hour before buying it and everything seemed solid, and I had it inspected at a local shop. It has Shimano Ultegra groupset and rides awesome. I do have a few concerns. I did find a source for the wheels and they suggest do not exceeding 120kg for long-term, thats 263lbs - so I'm right on the mark if you add in my bike+gear. I may be actually over that limit by a bit, but once I drop some lbs that will be okay. Is this just a suggestion for long-term riding, or will they still hold up to a heaver rider until I can afford to lose some weight?

I used to weigh 360lbs, I'm down to 250 right now and plan to continue to drop weight into the 200 range, buying this road bike was to help me achieve my cardio. I've been reading some things and have a few concerns.

Will my 20 spoke wheels be okay at my weight? They are: Mavic Aksium Elite wheels

What should I put in for tire pressure? I've never owned a road bike that has super narrow and hard tires like this bike does. I will need to purchase a new air pump that can pump these up, can you recommend anything under $50.00 that I can keep in my backpack while I ride? I was told to run up to 150psi if I can, due to my weight.

Anything I should lookout for or be aware of on this bike? Any other suggestions? Thank you.

Last edited by fat2fit; 05-02-19 at 10:12 AM.
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Old 05-02-19, 11:27 AM
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A catastrophic failure is very unlikely, but you may get spoke breakage after some time riding.

If I were you I would save my pennies until that day comes (if it ever does) and buy a new rear wheel (the front wheel is much less heavily loaded and generally you won't have an issue) with 32 spokes and a Shimano hub (I find Shimano hub bearings and overall construction to be the best).

Also, if the bike has 23mm wide tires, see if you can fit 25mm or thereabouts... this will allow you to run your tires at a slightly lower pressure which will then help transmit less shock through the rims and spokes and hubs.

Also, the 2014 Allegro 3.0 had 105 components, not Ultegra... so either you were misinformed or the previous owner upgraded the parts on it.
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Old 05-02-19, 11:28 AM
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Might get more response if posted in the Clydesdale forum.
Im not familiar with the aksium wheel but if they are anything like the ksyrium you should be fine. I was heavier than you riding the mavic ksyrium and they are bombproof. However if the spokes are set up the same and you break one you may need to purchase new wheel...difficult to replace.
150 psi seems pretty high, at your weight I was running 100 to 110 with no problems or flats.
I used to get all hung up about if I was too heavy for a certain bike, frame or wheels or whatever...just get out an ride and dont worry about it. I was riding a carbon post and a seat with carbon rails at 275lbs against advise with no problems. Just ride what you have and replace it if it breaks.
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Old 05-02-19, 11:43 AM
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Originally Posted by washed up View Post
Might get more response if posted in the Clydesdale forum.
Im not familiar with the aksium wheel but if they are anything like the ksyrium you should be fine. I was heavier than you riding the mavic ksyrium and they are bombproof. However if the spokes are set up the same and you break one you may need to purchase new wheel...difficult to replace.
150 psi seems pretty high, at your weight I was running 100 to 110 with no problems or flats.
I used to get all hung up about if I was too heavy for a certain bike, frame or wheels or whatever...just get out an ride and dont worry about it. I was riding a carbon post and a seat with carbon rails at 275lbs against advise with no problems. Just ride what you have and replace it if it breaks.
This is posted in the Clydesdale forum, isn't it? Thanks for the comforting post, lol. I worry I'ma be riding and this bike will just collapse on me haha. It's held up fine thus far. I'll run 100-110psi, thank you for that.

Originally Posted by Wilfred Laurier View Post
A catastrophic failure is very unlikely, but you may get spoke breakage after some time riding.

If I were you I would save my pennies until that day comes (if it ever does) and buy a new rear wheel (the front wheel is much less heavily loaded and generally you won't have an issue) with 32 spokes and a Shimano hub (I find Shimano hub bearings and overall construction to be the best).

Also, if the bike has 23mm wide tires, see if you can fit 25mm or thereabouts... this will allow you to run your tires at a slightly lower pressure which will then help transmit less shock through the rims and spokes and hubs.

Also, the 2014 Allegro 3.0 had 105 components, not Ultegra... so either you were misinformed or the previous owner upgraded the parts on it.

Yes I believe the tires can actually go up to 32mm, so I could look at upgrading tires. Are these tubeless? What's the average price to replace tires/tubes on road bikes if they pop? WRT group set, the previous owner has upgraded it. I will attach some pics! *actually I can't, because I'm not at 10 posts yet lol*

but yes they are sliver color and says Shimano Ultegra
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Old 05-02-19, 01:54 PM
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The tires will not 'pop' because you are a big person, if that is your concern. However, you do need to be proactive about keeping the tires inflated nice and firm - probably over 100psi for 25mm tires. Riding with underinflated tires (the definition of 'underinflated' depends on the rider weight, road conditions, riding style, etc) is very likely to result in 'pinch flats' (tire and tube getting pinched between the ground and the rim, damaging the inner tube) or damaging the rim.

If you can fit 32mm tires then do so - you can probably run them around ~80-90psi, they will roll lightning fast and give good comfort, traction, and rim protection.

The cost of a decent tire starts around ~$30 each. More expensive tires can either be faster rolling and lighter, or more resistant to damage and punctures and a bit slower. If you were strapped for cash there are also perfectly good tires for $20 or less each. My absolute favourite tires are Panaracer Pasela - available in lightweight and supple fast rolling, and slightly less fast puncture resistant versions. The fast ones are usually sold for about $25 each and they come in many many sizes!

The great thing about tires is that they wear out if you ride a lot, so you can reward yourself for riding a lot by buying new tires!
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Old 05-02-19, 02:47 PM
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Originally Posted by Wilfred Laurier View Post
The tires will not 'pop' because you are a big person, if that is your concern. However, you do need to be proactive about keeping the tires inflated nice and firm - probably over 100psi for 25mm tires. Riding with underinflated tires (the definition of 'underinflated' depends on the rider weight, road conditions, riding style, etc) is very likely to result in 'pinch flats' (tire and tube getting pinched between the ground and the rim, damaging the inner tube) or damaging the rim.

If you can fit 32mm tires then do so - you can probably run them around ~80-90psi, they will roll lightning fast and give good comfort, traction, and rim protection.

The cost of a decent tire starts around ~$30 each. More expensive tires can either be faster rolling and lighter, or more resistant to damage and punctures and a bit slower. If you were strapped for cash there are also perfectly good tires for $20 or less each. My absolute favourite tires are Panaracer Pasela - available in lightweight and supple fast rolling, and slightly less fast puncture resistant versions. The fast ones are usually sold for about $25 each and they come in many many sizes!

The great thing about tires is that they wear out if you ride a lot, so you can reward yourself for riding a lot by buying new tires!
Hi again,

Thanks for the reply. The tires I have right now are Continental Gatorskin Pros. Not sure of the exact size tbh. I bought a hand-pump from my local bike shop but I don't think it has the correct valve adapter, so I'll have to take it back and see if they'll let me swap it for a road pump one. I'll ask about 32mm tires while I'm there, but I'll probably not upgrade until these ones get a hole.

Do you know how high my seat height should be? I lowered the seat so it sits right around my waste and I see some riders who have their seatpost high as hell, not sure if I'm riding in the wrong position. I also made the seat nearly flat, maybe downward just a little bit. I got this bike used so I wasn't able to get properly fitted for it. I also noticed the shifting is different than my mountain bike. Does the left shifters just control the rear cassette and the right shifters only the chainring? I swear I hit the right shifter and it changed my rear gearing, maybe I could be mistaken.

thanks again for the help PS im a total noob to riding a bike in general, my mountain bike I got not long ago to start being active until I realized I want to go FAST around town and I hated how slow my other bike was and it didn't "coast" at all.

Thanks again
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Old 05-03-19, 06:27 AM
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Most (all?) bike pumps will work with both valve types. You may have to flip a gasket over or something. The shop where you bought it can show you.
However, hand pumps are generally not ideal to use as your only pump - you need a floor pump that can easily get up to 100 psi. It may be possible with a hand pump, but generally quite difficult and it often puts too much force on the valve stem, and if that is damaged you have to replace the inner tube. carry your hand pump on your bike with a spare tube for emergencies. I got my floor pump for $30 from a big-box retailer. Your bike shop will also likely have a floor pump to suit you.

The correct height for your seat is when your leg is almost completely straight at the bottom of the pedal stroke, with your foot roughly level and the ball of your foot over the pedal axle. You don't want significant bend in your knee at its most expended point, and you don't want to have to reach down with your foot to keep it on the pedal. This may be a different amount of extension from the frame for each rider and each bike, so don't worry that others' bikes are 'right' and yours is 'wrong'. Set yours up to be comfortable to ride for you.
If the seatpost has to be all the way down into the frame or extended past the maximum extension line (stamped into the seatpost a couple inches from its lower end) to get comfortable or achieve proper leg extension, that is generally an indicator that you might have the wrong size frame.
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Old 05-03-19, 10:04 AM
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Originally Posted by Wilfred Laurier View Post
Most (all?) bike pumps will work with both valve types. You may have to flip a gasket over or something. The shop where you bought it can show you.
However, hand pumps are generally not ideal to use as your only pump - you need a floor pump that can easily get up to 100 psi. It may be possible with a hand pump, but generally quite difficult and it often puts too much force on the valve stem, and if that is damaged you have to replace the inner tube. carry your hand pump on your bike with a spare tube for emergencies. I got my floor pump for $30 from a big-box retailer. Your bike shop will also likely have a floor pump to suit you.

The correct height for your seat is when your leg is almost completely straight at the bottom of the pedal stroke, with your foot roughly level and the ball of your foot over the pedal axle. You don't want significant bend in your knee at its most expended point, and you don't want to have to reach down with your foot to keep it on the pedal. This may be a different amount of extension from the frame for each rider and each bike, so don't worry that others' bikes are 'right' and yours is 'wrong'. Set yours up to be comfortable to ride for you.
If the seatpost has to be all the way down into the frame or extended past the maximum extension line (stamped into the seatpost a couple inches from its lower end) to get comfortable or achieve proper leg extension, that is generally an indicator that you might have the wrong size frame.
Hey thanks for the reply. I went to my shop and they swapped my handpump I bought from them for a floor pump with a gauge. I pumped my tires up to about 100-110 psi and rode around town for a solid hour yesterday after the gym (and rode to the gym!) - bike is awesome, I notice it has a difficult time sometimes shifting into the top chainring though, maybe it could use an adjustment. My chain also rubs against the front derailer "guard" on the outer side when in certain gears which has no affect on the ride but it can be loud. Should I take the bike in to tune this or can I watch a video on how to adjust this myself? I'm pretty mechanically inclined, I used to race motocross and would rebuild motors, check valves, etc. all the time so I'm sure I can learn how to make derailer adjustments I just don't want to screw it up so I can't shift it at all lol.

Thanks, I'll have to double check to see if my leg is straight out when I put it down on the pedal, and make proper adjustments from there.

Cheers
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Old 05-03-19, 10:40 AM
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There is often a 'half click' or 'trim' on the left shifter - if the chain is on the extreme ends of the cogs on the back, you can push the shift levers lightly and the derailleur will move a tiny bit to get rid of the rubbing. If the rubbing is happening when on the larger cogs (easier gears) at the rear, then you would tap the smaller shift lever. If the rubbing is on the smaller cogs (harder gears) then you will probably trim it with the larger lever (the one you also use to brake).

There are loads of online instructions if you want to readjust it, but front derailleurs can be a bit of a PITA.
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Old 05-03-19, 01:51 PM
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Originally Posted by fat2fit View Post
This is posted in the Clydesdale forum, isn't it?
Yep...I didn't know where I was.
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Old 05-03-19, 06:04 PM
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I really like lezyne for pums both shop pumps and carry on the bike this would work https://magshop.lezyne.com/handpumps...ite-drive.html

I would put 25mm or 28mm tires on if you can fit them

have fun going fast
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Old 05-04-19, 06:23 AM
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Definitely invest in a good floor pump with a pressure gauge. I own three of them, a Top Peak Joe Blow Sport II recently because my wife was complaining I didn't have enough of them (honestly!) I think is an excellent all rounder and not too expensive at $50, and a wise investment. Until you get yourself some Michelin Airstop inner tubes, it's wise to check your inflation PSI before every ride to avoid pinch flats.

I wouldn't personally worry about upgrading/changing tires and or wheels yet, just ride what you have until they break, then upgrade.
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Old 05-06-19, 09:46 AM
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Originally Posted by squirtdad View Post
I really like lezyne for pums both shop pumps and carry on the bike this would work
I would put 25mm or 28mm tires on if you can fit them

have fun going fast
Hey, my shop said I could maybe fit a 25 or 28mm wheel, but definitely not a 32mm. For now it has 23mm Gatorskins, I'm just gonna rock these tires until they wear out. The bike seems to hold up fine to my weight, as far as I can tell.

Originally Posted by Wilfred Laurier View Post
There is often a 'half click' or 'trim' on the left shifter - if the chain is on the extreme ends of the cogs on the back, you can push the shift levers lightly and the derailleur will move a tiny bit to get rid of the rubbing. If the rubbing is happening when on the larger cogs (easier gears) at the rear, then you would tap the smaller shift lever. If the rubbing is on the smaller cogs (harder gears) then you will probably trim it with the larger lever (the one you also use to brake).

There are loads of online instructions if you want to readjust it, but front derailleurs can be a bit of a PITA.
Thank you for the information. I may have to dabble in this soon. This weekend I had the chain pop and get stuck between the frame and crank/lower chainring. It was a big hassle to get un-stuck, ended up having to take the chainring apart and somehow I managed to wedge the chain back out, but it ran good afterwards. Took it to my shop and they showed me how to adjust my front derailer, but it seems to run okay for now so I'm not going to mess with it until I NEED to.

Originally Posted by washed up View Post
Yep...I didn't know where I was.
Lol, no worries.
Originally Posted by dr_lha View Post
Definitely invest in a good floor pump with a pressure gauge. I own three of them, a Top Peak Joe Blow Sport II recently because my wife was complaining I didn't have enough of them (honestly!) I think is an excellent all rounder and not too expensive at $50, and a wise investment. Until you get yourself some Michelin Airstop inner tubes, it's wise to check your inflation PSI before every ride to avoid pinch flats.

I wouldn't personally worry about upgrading/changing tires and or wheels yet, just ride what you have until they break, then upgrade.
Hi, Yeah I went to my shop on Friday and exchanged my old pump for a better one which is a floor pump with gauge. It was a $60 dollar pump, solid quality and goes up to 160psi. I was able to get 110-120 PSI in my tires no problem. Like you said, im going to ride it until they break and then upgrade.

Thank you
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Old 05-07-19, 08:42 AM
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Originally Posted by Wilfred Laurier View Post
The tires will not 'pop' because you are a big person, if that is your concern. However, you do need to be proactive about keeping the tires inflated nice and firm - probably over 100psi for 25mm tires. Riding with underinflated tires (the definition of 'underinflated' depends on the rider weight, road conditions, riding style, etc) is very likely to result in 'pinch flats' (tire and tube getting pinched between the ground and the rim, damaging the inner tube) or damaging the rim.

If you can fit 32mm tires then do so - you can probably run them around ~80-90psi, they will roll lightning fast and give good comfort, traction, and rim protection.

The cost of a decent tire starts around ~$30 each. More expensive tires can either be faster rolling and lighter, or more resistant to damage and punctures and a bit slower. If you were strapped for cash there are also perfectly good tires for $20 or less each. My absolute favourite tires are Panaracer Pasela - available in lightweight and supple fast rolling, and slightly less fast puncture resistant versions. The fast ones are usually sold for about $25 each and they come in many many sizes!

The great thing about tires is that they wear out if you ride a lot, so you can reward yourself for riding a lot by buying new tires!
While I'm glad you mentioned rim damage as a result of low pressure, I wish more people would concentrate on that then "pinch flats". Pinch flats are inconvenient but can be fixed cheaply. Rim damage is ranging towards a catastrophe. The current fad of riding on flat tires...aka lowest possible pressure...makes rim damage far more likely.

Originally Posted by Wilfred Laurier View Post
A catastrophic failure is very unlikely, but you may get spoke breakage after some time riding.
Again, I don't quite agree. While the wheels probably won't fold over if a spoke breaks, spoke breakage is close to catastrophic failure. Wheels don't have spare spokes that they can break and maintain integrity. Low spoke count wheels doubly so. Each individual spoke on the Aksium's is carrying a lot of load. Break one and the others have to take up the load. That puts a lot of stress on the other spokes.

Originally Posted by Wilfred Laurier View Post
If I were you I would save my pennies until that day comes (if it ever does) and buy a new rear wheel (the front wheel is much less heavily loaded and generally you won't have an issue) with 32 spokes and a Shimano hub (I find Shimano hub bearings and overall construction to be the best).
Sorry to be so contrary but, again, I don't agree. 32 spokes is a good idea. But there are far better hubs out there than Shimano. The cup and cones of the Shimano means that the hubs need regular and rather frequent maintenance. They also need to be adjusted properly to roll smoothly and that they can go out of adjustment rather easily if not properly assembled. A cartridge bearing hub similar to the Aksium's bearings don't have to be serviced as often...if ever...and in my experience roll much more smoothly than the Shimano hubs. The best ones I've run across in terms of smoothness is any of the White Industries hubs. The MI5 or T11 are excellent choices. The T11 has a slightly higher flange on the driveside which allows for shorter spokes where you need them. As an added bonus both come with titanium freehub bodies which significantly reduce the wheel weight.

I would also suggest building (or having a wheel built) with triple butted spokes like the DT Alpine III. Those go a very long way towards a very strong wheel for a heavy rider.

Originally Posted by fat2fit View Post
Hi,

I just got my first road bike. I have been riding an entry level mountain bike but often found myself traveling on pavement most of the time and it really made me want to get a faster bike to commute around town. I found a used road bike in great shape and was a high-end bike at the time of it being brand new.

My bike is a 2014 Opus Allegro 3.0. It's full carbon with 21mm rims, and 20 spoke wheels front and rear. I've ridden it around for about an hour before buying it and everything seemed solid, and I had it inspected at a local shop. It has Shimano Ultegra groupset and rides awesome. I do have a few concerns. I did find a source for the wheels and they suggest do not exceeding 120kg for long-term, thats 263lbs - so I'm right on the mark if you add in my bike+gear. I may be actually over that limit by a bit, but once I drop some lbs that will be okay. Is this just a suggestion for long-term riding, or will they still hold up to a heaver rider until I can afford to lose some weight?

I used to weigh 360lbs, I'm down to 250 right now and plan to continue to drop weight into the 200 range, buying this road bike was to help me achieve my cardio. I've been reading some things and have a few concerns.

Will my 20 spoke wheels be okay at my weight? They are: Mavic Aksium Elite wheels

What should I put in for tire pressure? I've never owned a road bike that has super narrow and hard tires like this bike does. I will need to purchase a new air pump that can pump these up, can you recommend anything under $50.00 that I can keep in my backpack while I ride? I was told to run up to 150psi if I can, due to my weight.

Anything I should lookout for or be aware of on this bike? Any other suggestions? Thank you.
I'm not going to address everything here but I will address the pressure. No, you don't need to run them at 150 psi. 100 psi will do just fine for your weight. Few tires can take 150 psi without blowing off the rim.

The one thing I will address is how you ride. With thin tires and low spoke count, you really need to develop the ability to ride "light" in the saddle. You should ride with your weight partially suspended by your legs and arms at all times. You should just "sit" in the saddle but you kind of hover over it while you ride. You aren't standing but you are in less contact with the saddle than if you put your full weight on it.

As you approach potholes and cracks in pavement, rise up off the saddle so that the bike isn't in contact with you at all. Ride with loose arms and legs as well. This will allow the bike to bounce upward and reduce the impact on the bicycle while your legs and arms provide the absorption of the impact. The very last thing you want to do (in any situation, really) is to "brace for impact". You can't and if you are stiff, you and the bike will just get hammered.
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Old 05-07-19, 10:04 AM
  #15  
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Originally Posted by fat2fit View Post
Hi,

I just got my first road bike. I have been riding an entry level mountain bike but often found myself traveling on pavement most of the time and it really made me want to get a faster bike to commute around town. I found a used road bike in great shape and was a high-end bike at the time of it being brand new.

My bike is a 2014 Opus Allegro 3.0. It's full carbon with 21mm rims, and 20 spoke wheels front and rear. I've ridden it around for about an hour before buying it and everything seemed solid, and I had it inspected at a local shop. It has Shimano Ultegra groupset and rides awesome. I do have a few concerns. I did find a source for the wheels and they suggest do not exceeding 120kg for long-term, thats 263lbs - so I'm right on the mark if you add in my bike+gear. I may be actually over that limit by a bit, but once I drop some lbs that will be okay. Is this just a suggestion for long-term riding, or will they still hold up to a heaver rider until I can afford to lose some weight?

I used to weigh 360lbs, I'm down to 250 right now and plan to continue to drop weight into the 200 range, buying this road bike was to help me achieve my cardio. I've been reading some things and have a few concerns.

Will my 20 spoke wheels be okay at my weight? They are: Mavic Aksium Elite wheels

What should I put in for tire pressure? I've never owned a road bike that has super narrow and hard tires like this bike does. I will need to purchase a new air pump that can pump these up, can you recommend anything under $50.00 that I can keep in my backpack while I ride? I was told to run up to 150psi if I can, due to my weight.

Anything I should lookout for or be aware of on this bike? Any other suggestions? Thank you.
Most likely, you will blow a spoke or two out. When I bought a new bike, full carbon and full Ultegra group set, of course, the weakest component on almost all new bikes are the wheels. I only weighed 220 compared with you and was running Fulcrum wheels. I wrote Fulcrum and contacted the bike manufacturer with no luck. Back to LBS and they retrued the wheel but said more than likely I will have to replace the wheel since it was not rated for over 190lbs! Why sell me the bike then?

Anyways, to make a long story short, I could not keep the rear wheel true. Finally gave up and went to a local wheelwright and had him build me a rear wheel with my same Shimano hub. Rim was a Hed and 32 spoke count. Don't go less on the rear. Remember, even with 32, at any given time, ONLY 4 spokes are carrying your weight! Since I had my wheel rebuilt, no problems and I've put about 10k of miles on the rear wheel. It cost me 250 for the new wheel rebuilt on the Hed rim.

If you have 500 to spare, ROL wheels has a set specifically for heavy riders and they are supposed to be good wheels.

For sure though, the weakest out the box part on a new bike are the wheels. Get a new rear wheel built with a spoke count of 32 and you should be good to go. I would up the gatorskins to 25 though. That is what I have run for the last 6 years and have yet to flat except for a pinch flat hitting a pothole but no punctures with over 20k of miles. Plus, don't ride thru the marbles on the side of the road. I also run a lot higher pressure at around 118 on the rear.

john
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Old 05-07-19, 10:14 AM
  #16  
Wilfred Laurier
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Originally Posted by cyccommute View Post
... there are far better hubs out there than Shimano. The cup and cones of the Shimano means that the hubs need regular and rather frequent maintenance. They also need to be adjusted properly to roll smoothly and that they can go out of adjustment rather easily if not properly assembled. A cartridge bearing hub similar to the Aksium's bearings don't have to be serviced as often...if ever...and in my experience roll much more smoothly than the Shimano hubs. The best ones I've run across in terms of smoothness is any of the White Industries hubs. The MI5 or T11 are excellent choices. The T11 has a slightly higher flange on the driveside which allows for shorter spokes where you need them. As an added bonus both come with titanium freehub bodies which significantly reduce the wheel weight...
Cartridge bearings are great, but make maintenance, even if it is less frequent, less user-friendly. Cup-and-cone are generations old and can be rebuilt with two tools and (if necessary) no extra parts. If the cones wear out, they are available as replacements, if the hub needs adjusting, it is designed to facilitate that.

Furthermore, Shimano freehub bodies are available as a relatively low-cost replacement if they do go bad years down the road. And since they are steel, rather than Ti, they are generally stronger to begin with.
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Old 05-07-19, 01:28 PM
  #17  
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Originally Posted by Wilfred Laurier View Post
Cartridge bearings are great, but make maintenance, even if it is less frequent, less user-friendly. Cup-and-cone are generations old and can be rebuilt with two tools and (if necessary) no extra parts. If the cones wear out, they are available as replacements, if the hub needs adjusting, it is designed to facilitate that.
"Less frequent" is on the order of years (perhaps decades) and thousands to tens of thousands of miles.


Originally Posted by Wilfred Laurier View Post
Furthermore, Shimano freehub bodies are available as a relatively low-cost replacement if they do go bad years down the road. And since they are steel, rather than Ti, they are generally stronger to begin with.
Some Shimano free hubs are available years down the road. But not all Shimano freehub bodies are interchangeable. White Industries is a well established company that has been around for "years" as well. Replacements aren't unavailable. Additionally, a rebuild on a Shimano freehub is difficult to impossible while rebuilding a White Industries freehub is about as difficult as replacing the bearings in the hub which is far less difficult then you make it out to be.
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Old 05-09-19, 06:34 AM
  #18  
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Congrats on your weight loss! I know how it feels, having lost 110 pounds this past year, and looking to drop another 25 or so to get to 240...

I've always been reluctant to have carbon fiber. Why have the light weight when that heavy? Now, I just bought a 2006 CAAD8 frame with carbon fork. It's a reward to build up later...

Low spoke wheels. I was picking up some wheels recently for my old steel bike, and the seller had some Shimano wheels, 16 spoke front, 20 rear. They look cool, and the rear is fine on my trainer. But I am very leery about riding low spoke count wheels. Same with radial laced wheels. But that is a 25 year old prejudice on my part... He offered them at a price too low to pass on since I was getting another set...

The wheels look nice, but I doubt I ride them till I weigh a lot less. Bike is my first "real" bike, 1986 KHS Fiero. Updated everything but the fork, quill and bars... Had it 30 years now, been flogged and beat and ignored, but I still love the way it rides.

I currently will not ride narrower than 700x25 tires. Some is old prejudice based on my weight, but as mentioned above, better ride for my weight. I want to snag another set of wheels for my 29er and run 700x42 gravel tires sometimes... The existing 700x54 tires are still a lot faster than I ever expected.

Again, CONGRATS!
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Old 05-14-19, 07:25 AM
  #19  
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My wife has the same frame and I can tell you it will not work well with 25's on it. There is clearance but even at her 165lbs the tire would rub chain stay when climbing. 23's are fine.
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Old 05-14-19, 01:47 PM
  #20  
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Hey buddy! Looks like you've already got a lot of great advice on here. I'm currently 225 but even when I was racing I was 185 so I've never been "small". Just to consolidate some knowledge already given..get the widest tires you can fit on that frame. It'll be worth it for less flats and more comfort. You'll definitely be trying the patience of a 23mm (even a gatorskin--which btw is a great tire just kind of pokey). Invest in a digital tire pressure sensor like the Topeak smart gauge. Pumps are measuring the pressure in the pump, no necessarily the tire. Get out as often as you can, even a short ride is well worth it.

Also, congrats to everyone on the thread who has lost weight riding. As I'm swiftly approaching 50 I've learned the hard way the weight gets harder to shed!

I'm new here myself. Maybe there should be a thread with goals/progress for weight loss? Is there such a thing?
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