Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > General Cycling Discussion
Reload this Page >

Aluminum: are there any fans left?

Notices
General Cycling Discussion Have a cycling related question or comment that doesn't fit in one of the other specialty forums? Drop on in and post in here! When possible, please select the forum above that most fits your post!

Aluminum: are there any fans left?

Old 06-12-20, 12:54 PM
  #51  
base2 
Random Internet Person.
 
base2's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Location: Pacific Northwest
Posts: 1,328

Bikes: 5 good ones, and the occasional project.

Mentioned: 13 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 682 Post(s)
Liked 247 Times in 152 Posts
Aluminum FAN? There is just too much involved in bicycle engineering & variation in components & design to have single minded focus on material.

Nailing any one characteristic to frame material, in isolation, is a fools errand. Bikes components (aside from the frame) are all made with a variety of materials too.

Fanaticism is dumb...As is most other -ism's.
base2 is offline  
Likes For base2:
Old 06-12-20, 01:13 PM
  #52  
General Geoff
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Allentown, Pennsylvania
Posts: 774

Bikes: 2018 Lynskey Cooper CX; 2007 Cannondale F4; 2008 Trek 7.3 FX

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 365 Post(s)
Liked 133 Times in 58 Posts
Pertinent to this thread:
https://www.sheldonbrown.com/rinard/...tigue_test.htm

The strongest, most durable and long lasting frame in the test was aluminum.
General Geoff is offline  
Old 06-12-20, 01:40 PM
  #53  
livedarklions
Cogs in back, right?
 
livedarklions's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2018
Location: New England
Posts: 7,357

Bikes: Serotta Atlanta; 1994 Specialized Allez Pro; Motobecane Fantom CX; Giant OCR A1

Mentioned: 45 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3812 Post(s)
Liked 2,576 Times in 1,480 Posts
Leather
livedarklions is offline  
Likes For livedarklions:
Old 06-12-20, 01:50 PM
  #54  
Thomas15
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: NE PA
Posts: 288
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 97 Post(s)
Liked 120 Times in 80 Posts
Originally Posted by 79pmooney View Post
....
My point (after that long digression) is that steel, when it breaks, fails in a manner that rarely causes injury (barring non-heat treated nickle-plating and other known no-no's). Aluminum (and carbon fiber) do not share that, Yes, both can be made very well and strong and go a long ways, but as I said before, I ride frames I love until they break. I want them to die gently - for my health.

Ben
Please explain to us why aircraft (airframes) are made out of aluminum. Is it because Boeing hates humanity?
Thomas15 is offline  
Likes For Thomas15:
Old 06-12-20, 02:03 PM
  #55  
70sSanO
Senior Member
 
70sSanO's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: Mission Viejo
Posts: 1,954

Bikes: 1986 Cannondale SR400 (Flat bar commuter), 1988 Cannondale Criterium XTR, 1992 Serotta T-Max, 1995 Trek 970

Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 407 Post(s)
Liked 147 Times in 111 Posts
Originally Posted by Paul Barnard View Post
I don't begrudge those who have to suffer aluminum frames on account of their limited financial means. I used to be poor too.
Youíre not that rich if you have to tell someone.

John
70sSanO is online now  
Likes For 70sSanO:
Old 06-12-20, 02:17 PM
  #56  
ljsense
Senior Member
 
ljsense's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Madison, Wis.
Posts: 622
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 203 Post(s)
Liked 77 Times in 43 Posts
Originally Posted by Thomas15 View Post
Please explain to us why aircraft (airframes) are made out of aluminum. Is it because Boeing hates humanity?
Haha, good one. Hadn't thought of it that way.
ljsense is offline  
Old 06-12-20, 02:31 PM
  #57  
mr_bill
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 4,161
Mentioned: 33 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1864 Post(s)
Liked 346 Times in 251 Posts
Aluminum fans. Hope this helps.

-mr. bill
mr_bill is offline  
Likes For mr_bill:
Old 06-12-20, 02:40 PM
  #58  
cyccommute 
Mad bike riding scientist
 
cyccommute's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Denver, CO
Posts: 22,705

Bikes: Some silver ones, a red one, an orange one and a few titanium ones

Mentioned: 111 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3347 Post(s)
Liked 798 Times in 505 Posts
Originally Posted by 79pmooney View Post

My point (after that long digression) is that steel, when it breaks, fails in a manner that rarely causes injury (barring non-heat treated nickle-plating and other known no-no's). Aluminum (and carbon fiber) do not share that, Yes, both can be made very well and strong and go a long ways, but as I said before, I ride frames I love until they break. I want them to die gently - for my health.

Ben
People are under the mistaken impression that aluminum is a brittle material that "shatters" when it breaks. That doesn't describe aluminum (or carbon fiber or fiberglass or a number of other materials that are "known" to shatter on impact). Aluminum is a very soft metal. Yes, it can crack but that crack propagates as a tear in the metal. It seldom just shears off without warning. In fact, shearing off without warning is something that describes steel's failure mode much more than aluminum's.

I've broken steel frames and parts and I've broken aluminum frames and parts. Steel has always just gone "ping!" and it's broken...think of how a spoke breaks. I've broken pedals...the spindle just sheared off without warning or bending or gentle release of energy. The spindle was attached one minute and broken in two the next. Steel frames have broken on me the same way. There's not warning. The frame is just broken. I've had a steel fork break on me which I discovered while I was changing bearings but the crack never manifested as anything that could be seen as a warning that something was wrong.

On the other hand, I've broken a fair share of aluminum parts as well. I broke a crank. When I thought back on it, the crank was making a creaking noise long before it broke. I've broken numerous rims from cracks at the spokes to cracks down the middle of the rim on the inner wall to side walls. They all made noise prior to failure. Same with frames. The frames creak and groan prior to me noticing cracks. I also broke an aluminum fork and it made a lot of noise before it broke. Often I've ignored the noise but it was there and noticeable even if I didn't note it.

This makes sense if you consider the way that both materials behave under load. Steel, being stiffer, doesn't really bend until such time as there is too little metal to hold the tube in place. When the last little bit of metal breaks it does so rapidly because the material is stiff and strong. The steel can handle bending even as the crack propagates because of the stiffness and strength.

Aluminum is strong as long as the tube is solid but when a crack develops, the crack will will open and close as the frame flexes. The ends of the crack rub against each other and the noise resonates through the metal. We just usually ignore those warnings.

But, honestly, there's nothing wrong with aluminum as a frame material. The vast majority of mountain bikes are made of aluminum. I haven't noticed piles of shattered mountain along the trails nor do I see that many aluminum mountain bikes that are broken in my local co-op...and I see a lot of bikes per year. On the other hand, I don't see a lot of broken steel bikes either. I've broken 4 frames...2 of each material...out of 39 bikes I've owned. I consider a broken frame of any material to be more of an aberration than proof that there is something wrong with the material of construction.

Finally, let me ask: If you worry so much about aluminum's failure mode, do you ride steel wheels with steel hubs? Steel cranks? Steel handlebars? If you use aluminum for any of those applications, why aren't you worried about those parts failing?
__________________
Stuart Black
Gold Fever Three days of dirt in Colorado
Pokin' around the Poconos A cold ride around Lake Erie
Dinosaurs in Colorado A mountain bike guide to the Purgatory Canyon dinosaur trackway
Solo Without Pie. The search for pie in the Midwest.
Picking the Scablands. Washington and Oregon, 2005. Pie and spiders on the Columbia River!
Days of Wineless Roads. Bed and Breakfasting along the KATY
Twisting Down the Alley. Misadventures in tornado alley.
cyccommute is online now  
Likes For cyccommute:
Old 06-12-20, 02:47 PM
  #59  
Sandstrom
Senior Member
 
Sandstrom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2019
Location: Cincinnati
Posts: 166
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 38 Post(s)
Liked 69 Times in 42 Posts
Originally Posted by mr_bill View Post
Mmmmmhhh Ahhhhhh, feeling cooler already, thanks!
Sandstrom is offline  
Old 06-12-20, 02:54 PM
  #60  
fietsbob 
coprolite
 
fietsbob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: NW,Oregon Coast
Posts: 42,617

Bikes: 8

Mentioned: 194 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7334 Post(s)
Liked 941 Times in 595 Posts
fietsbob is offline  
Old 06-12-20, 02:57 PM
  #61  
friday1970
Senior Member
 
friday1970's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: Brighton, Michigan
Posts: 476

Bikes: Optima Baron LR, '14 Nishiki Maricopa,'87 Trek 330 Elance, '89 Miyata 1400, '85 Peugeot PGN10, '04 Fuji Ace, '06 Giant Rincon, '95 Giant Allegre, '83 Trek 620, '86 Schwinn High Sierra

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 159 Post(s)
Liked 61 Times in 41 Posts
Here's a good question. How does aluminum frames hold up against areas close to salt water? I plan to ship a bike to Okinawa, as something to use when I visit my in-laws. I'm assuming for the hot, salty air there, aluminum would be the most preferred material. Am I wrong in thinking this? Steel would rust, and I don't know how well carbon fiber would do in humid heat like what we have there. .
friday1970 is offline  
Old 06-12-20, 03:12 PM
  #62  
indyfabz
Senior Member
 
indyfabz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 26,946
Mentioned: 192 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 11383 Post(s)
Liked 3,020 Times in 1,681 Posts
Originally Posted by friday1970 View Post
Here's a good question. How does aluminum frames hold up against areas close to salt water? I plan to ship a bike to Okinawa, as something to use when I visit my in-laws. I'm assuming for the hot, salty air there, aluminum would be the most preferred material. Am I wrong in thinking this? Steel would rust, and I don't know how well carbon fiber would do in humid heat like what we have there. .
Donít know about the frame, but water and my caustic sweat caused the aluminum headset spacers to fuse with the steel steerer tube of my carbon fork. They had to be cut with a Dremel tool then pried off.
indyfabz is offline  
Old 06-12-20, 03:15 PM
  #63  
79pmooney
A Roadie Forever
 
79pmooney's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 8,396

Bikes: (2) ti TiCycles, 2007 w/ triple and 2011 fixed, 1979 Peter Mooney, ~1983 Trek 420 now fixed and ~1973 Raleigh Carlton Competition gravel grinder

Mentioned: 99 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2277 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 694 Times in 481 Posts
Originally Posted by Trakhak View Post
So you had a series of steel frames and forks that failed, and you've convinced yourself that aluminum is the failure-prone material. I know a guy who convinced himself that eating raw garlic is keeping him from coming down with COVID-19.

...
It's not that aluminum frames break more often, it is the failure mode. I've heard a lot more stories of diamonds braking and causing crashes with aluminum than steel. Welds failing. Front ends detaching. In all my steel failures, the bike has remained rideable after tubes severed completely (barring that one metulurgy oops). Yes, they broke quietly. No, I hadn't been checking the frames prior except my racing bike which I knew full well was on its way and was assured that I could ride it to failure, no big deal.

As I said before - I ride bikes I like until they die. I want them to die gently so I can walk away. I"ve used up too many of my 9 lives already I probably don't have another to spare. (Well, I am getting better at retiring bikies that I know have seen damage.) Of the common bike materials, steel (until you get into the high-strength alloys) is very forginving to minor damge. (I won't own a higher grade than 531 for that reason. If I want to go lighter, I go titanium where you can have far more material. My ti bikes are conservative, not light and very strong. Built by someone with decades in the business who is local so if I have any qualms, I can get ithem checked out any time..

Ben
79pmooney is offline  
Old 06-12-20, 04:32 PM
  #64  
Trakhak
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Baltimore, MD
Posts: 2,063
Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 528 Post(s)
Liked 174 Times in 126 Posts
Originally Posted by 79pmooney View Post
It's not that aluminum frames break more often, it is the failure mode. I've heard a lot more stories of diamonds braking and causing crashes with aluminum than steel. Welds failing. Front ends detaching. In all my steel failures, the bike has remained rideable after tubes severed completely (barring that one metulurgy oops). Yes, they broke quietly. No, I hadn't been checking the frames prior except my racing bike which I knew full well was on its way and was assured that I could ride it to failure, no big deal.
Setting aside the fact that, as explained in detail above by cyccommute, the true failure modes of steel and aluminum are very different from what you think they are, you hear more stories of aluminum failures (however few they are, and they are very few) than of steel failures because steel bikes, despite the impression given by steel bike lovers on BikeForums, have essentially barely registered above the level of statistical noise in the annual worldwide sales of bikes for the last 30 years.

By the way, I've noticed that, as a rule, C&V steel apologists seem to think that steel frames fail despite being steel, whereas aluminum frames fail because they're aluminum.

If anyone has wondered why aluminum took over the market from steel so quickly (despite the understandable initial reluctance of bike companies to invest in such a massive transposition), one clue comes from a chance conversation I had with a Trek sales rep in the early '90s. I asked what the effect of introducing their aluminum frames had had on Trek. The rep immediately said, "Warranty costs are down. We're spending much less money replacing frames under warranty because the failure rate is much lower with our aluminum frames."
Trakhak is offline  
Old 06-12-20, 04:35 PM
  #65  
bruce19
Senior Member
 
bruce19's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Lebanon (Liberty Hill), CT
Posts: 7,226

Bikes: CAAD 12, MASI Gran Criterium S, Colnago World Cup CX & Guru steel

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1197 Post(s)
Liked 531 Times in 313 Posts
Originally Posted by sjanzeir View Post
So, where are the aluminum fans in all of this? "
There's an entire thread called the Cult of CAAD. Look there.
bruce19 is offline  
Old 06-12-20, 04:44 PM
  #66  
berner
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Bristol, R. I.
Posts: 4,162

Bikes: Specialized Secteur, old Peugeot

Mentioned: 18 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 578 Post(s)
Liked 356 Times in 227 Posts
One problem I see with carbon composite is, so far anyway, it is not recycleable. At the end of it's useful life, so far anyway, it becomes a pile of trash. Even a beer can can be recycleable. Even the ullitmate output of beer is recycled.
berner is offline  
Old 06-12-20, 05:30 PM
  #67  
General Geoff
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Allentown, Pennsylvania
Posts: 774

Bikes: 2018 Lynskey Cooper CX; 2007 Cannondale F4; 2008 Trek 7.3 FX

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 365 Post(s)
Liked 133 Times in 58 Posts
Originally Posted by Trakhak View Post
If anyone has wondered why aluminum took over the market from steel so quickly (despite the understandable initial reluctance of bike companies to invest in such a massive transposition), one clue comes from a chance conversation I had with a Trek sales rep in the early '90s. I asked what the effect of introducing their aluminum frames had had on Trek. The rep immediately said, "Warranty costs are down. We're spending much less money replacing frames under warranty because the failure rate is much lower with our aluminum frames."
It's funny how popular perception is often so far from reality.
General Geoff is offline  
Likes For General Geoff:
Old 06-12-20, 05:38 PM
  #68  
Leinster
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: location location
Posts: 2,604

Bikes: MBK Super Mirage 1991, CAAD10, Yuba Mundo Lux, and a Cannondale Criterium Single Speed

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 182 Post(s)
Liked 103 Times in 79 Posts
Originally Posted by kingston View Post
I always recommend an aluminum frame as a starter bike because its cheaper and almost as good as other materials, but nobody aspires to own an aluminum bike. They settle for it.
When I was a kid, one of the older kids had a blue Cannondale, imported from the States. The big tubes and 105 groupset and cool blue paint job and, a couple of years later, Mario Cipollini, all made me want an aluminium bike. And now, years later, I own 2. (and a couple of steel ones).

I absolutely love my CAAD10. I tried cf bikes and steel bikes while shopping for it, but no other frame had the bang-for-buck that my CAAD had.

I feel no desire to ever buy a road bike again. The next bike I buy will be an offroad machine of some capacity. It will, most likely, be aluminium.
Leinster is offline  
Old 06-12-20, 05:54 PM
  #69  
bruce19
Senior Member
 
bruce19's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Lebanon (Liberty Hill), CT
Posts: 7,226

Bikes: CAAD 12, MASI Gran Criterium S, Colnago World Cup CX & Guru steel

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1197 Post(s)
Liked 531 Times in 313 Posts
I was out today on my CAAD 12 and I love this thing. As much as my Guru Sidero (steel). And, I love my Guru.

bruce19 is offline  
Likes For bruce19:
Old 06-12-20, 07:00 PM
  #70  
Mogens
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2018
Location: Green Bay, Wis.
Posts: 112

Bikes: 2019 Cannondale Synapse Alloy 105, 1981 Bianchi Limited, 1992 Wellstone Northfield

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 39 Post(s)
Liked 33 Times in 14 Posts
As of a few years ago, I had an aluminum hybrid bike that was awful. It was joyless and dull to ride and for about a decade I thought I just hated bicycling. And then I had a series of epiphanies that led to me buying a 1982 Bianchi road bike. It was zippy and just wanted to go fast. In a single summer, I went from not having biked more than a few blocks in years to riding a century. So that was my experience in 2018: aluminum = joyless, steel = joyful. Last year I decided that I wanted a bicycle more suited to the riding I wanted to do. The Bianchi was designed for racing and it was a little too small for me anyway. So I looked and I eventually settled on an aluminum Cannondale Synapse 105, and I LOVE it. Cannondale makes a big deal about it's "SAVE" frame architecture that builds some resilience into the frame. Whatever it is, it does not feel anything like the aluminum hybrid bike I used to own. Perhaps I would have preferred the CF, but the aluminum version was about as much money as I'm willing to spend on a bike. I have kids to put through college. Anyway, yeah. I'm a fan. If properly designed, aluminum bikes are an affordable and even elegant material for bicycle frames.
Mogens is offline  
Likes For Mogens:
Old 06-12-20, 08:26 PM
  #71  
Metieval
Senior Member
 
Metieval's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Ohio
Posts: 2,611

Bikes: Road bike, Hybrid, Gravel, Drop bar SS, hard tail MTB

Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1115 Post(s)
Liked 172 Times in 131 Posts
Originally Posted by sjanzeir View Post
I don't know if it's just me or that it's actually become a thing to crap all over aluminum recently, but if these great forums of ours are anything to go by, most everyone seems to be riding aluminum not because they want to, but because they feel like they have to.

Everywhere you look around the forums, people seem to be pining for something other than aluminum: there are the fanatical steel purists who talk down to you because... nostalgia and this whole "nothing rides better" business.

There are the cost-no-object carbon bros who seem to believe that the fact that they could afford, bought, and paid for carbon fiber somehow gives them the right - nay, the obligation - to crap on the "lesser beings" around here as their second favorite pastime.

Then there are the titanium elitists, whose other favorite sport seems to be crapping on other titanium elitists because... only they have the birthright to ride titanium? Or something - whatever.

And the bamboo people? There seems to be too few of them around here to cause any major controversy, aside from the possibly occasional you're-killing-the-planet-and-we're-saving-it mantra.

So, where are the aluminum fans in all of this? Are there any of them actually left? It's been a long time since I've seen anyone (dare to) say that they actually prefer aluminum to any other material, even though they could easily afford to ride carbon, steel or titanium. After having been dubbed "the material of the future" at some point in the history of cycling, how did aluminum fall from grace like this, to the point where it almost became "the material of the dumb?"

I love aluminum, just not the way they are designed now. Leaving the Down tube open ended with a raw edge at the BB... is a huge no for me.

Hydroforming AL, is so awesome, and then.. frame makers go and half ass the frames. I am pretty sure that was 1 engineer, and then it just got copied by many manufactures.

Really is no different than Gerard Vroomen making an Awesome Cervelo, and then some Twiddle dumb butt engineer comes along later and changes the tolerances on the Cervelo Blueprints for the BB, so they don't reject so many frames in manufacturing.... which leads to all kinds of trouble for the end users. (no names here, but that engineer now works for Cannondale, which also Explains why so many BB30 C'Dale frames have issues with the BB **CLUE!!!!!!**)

Anyways Aluminum has potential, but when treated like an entry level material, we the Cyclict, will get entry level engineering.

Last edited by Metieval; 06-13-20 at 01:22 AM.
Metieval is offline  
Likes For Metieval:
Old 06-12-20, 08:48 PM
  #72  
veganbikes
Clark W. Griswold
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: ,location, location
Posts: 6,127

Bikes: Foundry Chilkoot Ti W/Ultegra Di2, Salsa Timberjack Ti, Cinelli Mash Work RandoCross Fun Time Machine, 1x9 XT Parts Hybrid, Co-Motion Cascadia, Specialized Langster, Pink Klein MTB, Phil Wood VeloXS Frame (w/DA 7400), Cilo Road Frame, Proteus frame

Mentioned: 31 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1491 Post(s)
Liked 301 Times in 221 Posts
I just did a google search, tons of aluminum fans! Are you looking for a ceiling fan or something on the floor or something different?

I personally like the Dyson fan, very quiet and good airflow. Though I think the actual fan is plastic. Would be cool to do a Lexan or other plexiglass version with a brass inner fan so you could see the workings and because brass fans look cool.
veganbikes is offline  
Old 06-12-20, 08:53 PM
  #73  
ramzilla
Senior Member
 
ramzilla's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Location: Fernandina Beach FL
Posts: 3,211

Bikes: Vintage Japanese Bicycles, Tange, Ishiwata, Kuwahara

Mentioned: 19 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 603 Post(s)
Liked 192 Times in 152 Posts

AFAIK this is one of the oldest mass produced specimens of aluminum bikes on the planet. I think it's great. Light & fast. A great ride.
ramzilla is offline  
Likes For ramzilla:
Old 06-12-20, 08:59 PM
  #74  
ramzilla
Senior Member
 
ramzilla's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Location: Fernandina Beach FL
Posts: 3,211

Bikes: Vintage Japanese Bicycles, Tange, Ishiwata, Kuwahara

Mentioned: 19 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 603 Post(s)
Liked 192 Times in 152 Posts
I only had this one a couple of days. But, it was a really good riding machine.

Raleigh Revenio 1.0
ramzilla is offline  
Old 06-12-20, 09:10 PM
  #75  
DropBarFan
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 3,151

Bikes: 2013 Surly Disc Trucker, 2004 Novara Randonee , old fixie , etc

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 671 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 44 Times in 38 Posts
I think an aluminum frame plus a (nice) suspension fork & suspension seat-post would make a much better touring bike than currently popular steel:
--Same weight or even lighter
--more comfortable ride even with narrower faster tires
--better handling by obviating the need for frame geometry to absorb bumps
DropBarFan is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information

Copyright © 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.