Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Classic and Vintage Bicycles: Whats it Worth? Appraisals.
Reload this Page >

What do you guys think of this 1999 Marinoni?

Classic and Vintage Bicycles: Whats it Worth? Appraisals. Use this subforum for all requests as to "How much is this vintage bike worth?"Do NOT try to sell it in here, use the Marketplaces.

What do you guys think of this 1999 Marinoni?

Old 04-25-19, 03:01 PM
  #1  
Mushrooom
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: Québec
Posts: 16

Bikes: Alan Competition (under construction), Marinoni Ciclo 1999, Fiori Roma

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
What do you guys think of this 1999 Marinoni?

Hey guys,

I'm still a noob with road bikes, but I've been riding a Fiori Roma for a couple of years and I feel it's time for an upgrade. I want a rider, not a collectible, but I'm a lot into vintage Italian racing bikes, like Ciöcc, Colnago, Pinarello, Cinelli and all that stuff. Here in Quebec you can find a lot of Marinoni's for a fair price, so I thought it was a good place to start.

Could you give me your opinions on this particular one? I would be extremely grateful, as I don't have the knowledge to really judge for myself quite yet. The seller is very nice and I think he took great care of the bike. He bought it new in 1999 and he's the only owner.

Thank you all so much for your help!






Here are the specs:

Year: 1999
Frame: Colombus Ciclo Brain 54 cm
Speeds: 18
Handlebars: 42cc
Groupe: Shimano 105
Shifters: Shimano SORA (2015)
Chainrings: 39-52
Cassette: 12-25
Wheelset: Ambrosio Balance (2015)
Tires: Continental Grandsport Race 700 x 25mm
Saddle: Rolls
Pedals: PD-5500 Shimano SPD-R

Last edited by Mushrooom; 04-27-19 at 11:48 AM.
Mushrooom is offline  
Old 04-26-19, 06:31 AM
  #2  
randyjawa 
Senior Member
 
randyjawa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada - burrrrr!
Posts: 9,079

Bikes: 1958 Rabeneick 120D, 1968 Legnano Gran Premio, Rocky Mountain Cardiac

Mentioned: 142 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 565 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 14 Times in 12 Posts
Without decent pictures and knowing where the bike is located, it is difficult to appraise value. Marinoni bicycles are very high end Canadian made machines and highly respected. I have owned a few and never once been disappointed.

The bike you are interested in does not strike me as a top of the line Marinoni steed. Such bikes usually would have been fitted with top components such as Campagnolo or Shimano Dura Ace. In this case, I would place the bike as a middle of the line offering. And, for what it is worth, I bought this one last summer, or two summers ago, built it up per my customer's specifications and sold it for very low four figures (CND)...

as bought for $500.00 CND and the bike was in great shape...


as sold for about double what was paid and I ended up with a bunch of spare components that proved useful on my next build...


In closing you might be interested in determining what constitutes a quality vintage road bike. If so, you might enjoy and benefit from Vintage Bicycle Quality, an article I published some time ago. Vintage Bicycle Value might also be helpful.
__________________
Learn how to find, restore and maintain vintage road bicycles at... MY "TEN SPEEDS"
randyjawa is offline  
Likes For randyjawa:
Old 04-26-19, 08:18 AM
  #3  
T-Mar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Posts: 17,699
Mentioned: 422 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2430 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 39 Times in 37 Posts
Marinoni's Columbus Brain model, circa 1999, was the Ciclo. Brain was an advancement over the previous generation SL, in that the tubing was generally thinner but TIG weldable and offered in options that included oversize and non-round versions. The oversize and non-round tubes compensated for the loss of stiffness due to the thinner tubing. Circa 1999, I would expect TIG welding and oversize but round tubing on a Marinoni Ciclo.

The Ciclo was a randonneur style model in that it had rack mounts but did not employ cantilever brakes. It was designed for long, fast, day rides and was typically fitted with a triple crankset. Like most Marinoni models, it was available with a selection of Campagnolo and Shimano groups. Shimano 105 of this era was a solid performing mid-range group and MSRP for a 1999 Ciclo with Shimano 105 was $1980 CDN.

Fair value will be highly dependent on cosmetic and mechanical condition and, to a lesser extent, location. Assuming good, ready to ride condition, typical fair pricing would be around $550-$600 CDN and up to $700 in larger, hot markets, such as Montreal. Finally, be aware that the SPD-R pedals require cycling shoes with dedicated cleats. This will require a further investment for the proper shoes or replacement pedals.
T-Mar is offline  
Likes For T-Mar:
Old 04-27-19, 11:46 AM
  #4  
Mushrooom
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: Québec
Posts: 16

Bikes: Alan Competition (under construction), Marinoni Ciclo 1999, Fiori Roma

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Hey guys, thanks for the precious information! Sorry for not uploading any pictures before, but I had a linking restriction because I hadn't made 10 posts yet.

I edited my original post so that you can see what the bike looks like.

Still curious to hear your opinion.

Last edited by Mushrooom; 04-27-19 at 11:52 AM.
Mushrooom is offline  
Old 04-27-19, 09:22 PM
  #5  
spudly
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 72
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
IMO that's a beautiful bike - love the color! Looks to be in great condition. If it's your size, you like the way it rides (and looks) and the price is within reason and your budget (what's he asking?), I wouldn't hesitate. Though you're not looking for a collectible, this is still a quality bike with a lot of pizzazz.
spudly is offline  
Likes For spudly:
Old 04-27-19, 10:59 PM
  #6  
raymond1354
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 87
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Bonjour

I think that T-Mar has given you some very good information including the MRSP. I couldn't possibly improve on his post, but perhaps I can provide some context.

A friend (Shawn) gave me his Marinoni several years ago as he could no longer ride and it was just sitting in his shed. He had it made in the late 70's for touring and had put 25,000 miles on it. First time I rode it I said to myself, "Self, this is the best bike you have ever had." At that time I had my original Nishiki and some very classic very vintage Italian racing bikes. The Marinoni was surprisingly responsive, more so than the Nishiki, handling very much like a race bike, quick accelerating and responsive and ... comfortable. The Marinoni changed my taste in bikes completely - I would never buy a bike without fenders now or racks or at least the ability to put racks on. I would never buy a bike that didn't ride as well as my (Shawn's) Maronini.

I agree with T-Mar that the Marinoni you show is in the randonneur mold built for light touring. I've toured on mine and I commute on it with various loads hauling along files and the groceries that haven't fallen out onto the trail behind me. It is my go to bike and rides as well as any of my French bikes made by those famous guys. If I somehow lost my Marinoni, I would replace it. I wouldn't replace my French bikes - I would just cry and suck it up. It looks like I would replace the Marinoni with maybe something like the one you show - it appears to be a more modern version of mine.

I have a couple more points to make. The first is that the bike has got to fit - you. Shawn and I are about the same size so his bike fit me perfectly. Next is the equipment. I was looking for an everyday rider with racks and fenders, and gearing to take on hills. This bike was already set up for touring. The only equipment I switched were the shifters for barcons, the freewheel for a bailout gear and the derailleur which was a Duopar I didn't want to wreck. Pretty much instant bike. So if the bike fits and rides well and your happy with the equipment without needing to make significant changes, go for it if the price is right.

If you like the bike, but have to change out the equipment ........ it gets complicated and expensive very quickly. For example, for me this drive train is not good - the cassette can be changed to widen the range, but by how much? I have no idea what the derailleur will take. What about the front chainring? Will that crank take a smaller one? No idea. And everything's going to have to be Shimano 'cause that's what you got. Even racks and fenders are gonna set you back a sum.

But it should be a nice bike to ride.

Ray H.
Sudbury, Ontario
raymond1354 is offline  
Likes For raymond1354:
Old 04-28-19, 01:47 PM
  #7  
Mushrooom
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: Québec
Posts: 16

Bikes: Alan Competition (under construction), Marinoni Ciclo 1999, Fiori Roma

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Wow, thank you so much for your replies! I'll make an offer and see where it goes from there. I'm all in to upgrade some parts in the long term. For now, I just want to make sure the components are alright and that the frame looks good. I'm more or less 5'7, so a 54 cm frame is pretty much my exact size. There's another Colnago bike I'm looking into, but it's a 52 cm frame and I'm afraid it will be too small for me.

I'll keep you updated!
Mushrooom is offline  
Old 05-01-19, 06:15 PM
  #8  
Mushrooom
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: Québec
Posts: 16

Bikes: Alan Competition (under construction), Marinoni Ciclo 1999, Fiori Roma

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
OK you guys convinced me of giving this bike a try. It will be my first touring bike, so I'm very excited. Depending on how much I love the frame and general feel, I might consider upgrading the groupset once I ride it out. I paid a very reasonable price from what I understand. The seller was asking for XXX$ and I got it for XXX$ shipped. It's a shame I live in an island, there's so many bikes I can't try. Sometimes it's better to take a guess than to just stand there and let them beauties pass by.

I'll get it next week.

@randyjawa, I started reading your website!! Very useful information. I will refer back to it in my next buy/build that's for sure!

Last edited by Mushrooom; 05-20-19 at 01:09 PM.
Mushrooom is offline  
Old 05-20-19, 01:09 PM
  #9  
Mushrooom
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: Québec
Posts: 16

Bikes: Alan Competition (under construction), Marinoni Ciclo 1999, Fiori Roma

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Quick update:

Man, I had some serious doubts following my first ride, but after a couple of adjustments to the saddle and handlebar (positioning, height, angle), this bikes rides like butter over a hot pan! It floats and I barely feel like I'm pushing on it at all. In short, this is a killer bike and definitely a KEEPER!

Thanks to all of you who helped me make up my mind about this. It even came with a Bontrager Node 1.1. I still have to learn how to use it. The saddle is a San Marco Rolls and it's much more comfortable and classier than I thought.

Anyway, here are some new pics of the bike after my ride yesterday:




Last edited by Mushrooom; 05-29-19 at 02:37 PM. Reason: Reupped pictures
Mushrooom is offline  
Old 05-21-19, 03:57 PM
  #10  
merziac
Senior Member
 
merziac's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Location: PDX
Posts: 3,859

Bikes: Merz x 5 + Specialized Merz Allez x 2, Strawberry/Newlands, Gordon, Fuso/Moulton, Bornstein, Paisley, Paramounts, 3rensho, Moto TC, Raleigh Pro's, Marinoni, 1960 Cinelli SC, 1980 Bianchi SC and more

Mentioned: 84 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1055 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 22 Times in 17 Posts
Originally Posted by Mushrooom View Post
Quick update:

Man, I had some serious doubts following my first ride, but after a couple of adjustments to the saddle and handlebar (positioning, height, angle), this bikes rides like butter over a hot pan! It floats and I barely feel like I'm pushing on it at all. In short, this is a killer bike and definitely a KEEPER!

Thanks to all of you who helped me make up my mind about this. It even came with a Bontrager Node 1.1. I still have to learn how to use it. The saddle is a San Marco Rolls and it's much more comfortable and classier than I thought.

Anyway, here are some new pics of the bike after my ride yesterday:

Late to the party here, glad you listened, this was never going to be a bad decision as you found out.

Oh, and next time the pic is head to head, make sure yours is driveside.

Last edited by merziac; 05-21-19 at 04:02 PM.
merziac is offline  
Likes For merziac:
Old 05-23-19, 06:47 PM
  #11  
dj Velotiik
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2017
Posts: 13

Bikes: https://www.pedalroom.com/members/dj_velotiik

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
You'll be riding this for years and years...
dj Velotiik is offline  
Old 05-23-19, 08:08 PM
  #12  
raymond1354
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 87
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Bonjour:

Was hoping you'd post a follow-up. Glad you got it.


Took my own out the other day after riding one of those French bikes for a while - was surprised at how much more I liked the Marinoni. To be fair though, the French bike is more of a cyclosportif so is not as stable. What really got me is that the Marinoni is 700C and the ride was much less harsh than the French bike which is 650B. I also really can't change much on the French bike to suit me without risking the wrath of the bicycle gods.

Ray H.
Sudbury, Ontario
Canada
raymond1354 is offline  
Old 05-23-19, 08:39 PM
  #13  
curbtender
Senior Member
 
curbtender's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: SF Bay Area, East bay
Posts: 5,391

Bikes: Marinoni, Kestral 200 2002 Trek 5200, KHS Flite, Koga Miyata, Schwinn Spitfire 5, Schwinn Speedster, Mondia Special, Univega Alpina, Miyata team Ti, MB3

Mentioned: 24 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 484 Post(s)
Liked 8 Times in 8 Posts
Looks like a 9 speed. If you need more gears, you can put on an older deore long cage derailleur and bump that cassette up to a 34. Mine came with 6503 and a XT in the rear. Great mountain climber. Another vote for that jade green paint.

Last edited by curbtender; 05-29-19 at 05:07 PM.
curbtender is offline  
Old 05-29-19, 02:41 PM
  #14  
Mushrooom
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: Québec
Posts: 16

Bikes: Alan Competition (under construction), Marinoni Ciclo 1999, Fiori Roma

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
It is a 9 speed, indeed. Don't plan on adding any gears, but from what I understand, you can use a 9 speed derrailleur with a 10 speed cassette, the only things that need to be 10sp are the shifters and the chain.

Wasn't a big fan of the color at first, but the more I ride this bike, the more I like it!
Mushrooom is offline  
Old 05-29-19, 04:32 PM
  #15  
merziac
Senior Member
 
merziac's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Location: PDX
Posts: 3,859

Bikes: Merz x 5 + Specialized Merz Allez x 2, Strawberry/Newlands, Gordon, Fuso/Moulton, Bornstein, Paisley, Paramounts, 3rensho, Moto TC, Raleigh Pro's, Marinoni, 1960 Cinelli SC, 1980 Bianchi SC and more

Mentioned: 84 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1055 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 22 Times in 17 Posts
Originally Posted by Mushrooom View Post
It is a 9 speed, indeed. Don't plan on adding any gears, but from what I understand, you can use a 9 speed derrailleur with a 10 speed cassette, the only things that need to be 10sp are the shifters and the chain.

Wasn't a big fan of the color at first, but the more I ride this bike, the more I like it!
Atta boy, you will be assimilated!
merziac is offline  
Old 06-12-19, 04:47 AM
  #16  
CarGuy
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2019
Posts: 7
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
I have owned my Marinoni Special since 1981 and I still ride it to this day. The components have changed over the years from Dura Ace to Campagnolo Nuovo Record, most of which are still on the bike. I will never part with it.
CarGuy is offline  
Likes For CarGuy:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

Copyright © 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.