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Are Drop bars just an illusion for most?

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Are Drop bars just an illusion for most?

Old 09-02-19, 04:00 PM
  #76  
Metieval
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Originally Posted by wolfchild View Post
Judging other peoples fitness level and health by the type of handlebars they ride or the type of bike they ride means that your logic and reasoning is all screwed up and you don't know anything about other people...My flexibility and fitness level is above average and I still choose to ride either flat bars or riser bars which I have mounted a little higher because that's what I prefer. I feel like it gives me better control of the bike when riding in traffic or when ripping around on singletrack trails. I am not a drop bar guy and never will be. And no I never stretch because being physically active on the job and working out with weights and doing calisthenics maintains my mobility and flexibility.
the judgement in this thread was against drop bars, not your flat bars or riser bars. Nice try at flipping it around.
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Old 09-02-19, 04:08 PM
  #77  
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Originally Posted by FiftySix View Post
I got my bad back the old fashioned way. By lifting heavy things at work and being bent over for long periods while working on machinery.
I lifted stuff correctly, and never over lifted, no bad back. landscaping , pipe fitting, rigging

Originally Posted by FiftySix View Post
I got my bad knees and ankles the old fashioned way. By injuring them playing sports.
again, majority of knee ankle injuries come from a lack of fitness and strength, or a simple muscle imbalance. especially torn ACL's

Originally Posted by FiftySix View Post
I got other injuries the old fashioned way too. Car and motorcycle wrecks can do that sort of thing.
had my share, wrapped a steering wheel around the column at 45 mh, walked away

Originally Posted by FiftySix View Post
Schtuff happens and then ya gotta deal with it the rest of your life. But, I'm still riding bicycles, I just can't deal with low bars well. Whether it's drops or riser bars that are inverted.
stuff does happen, like fast food, cheap beer, processed foods, lack of fitness, lack of specific exercise, lack of hydration, stretching, nutrients.
my point wasn't about accidental stuff ( you knew that though) , my point was about all the avoidable stuff. stuff that could be prevented for many others growing up, except you'll want to throw healthy advice down the toilet. but hey thats what big pharmaceutical makes ibuprofen and advil for?
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Old 09-02-19, 04:10 PM
  #78  
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Originally Posted by Koyote View Post
They also seem to be doing a poor job of teaching proper grammar.
Is that all you have? when all else fails, then make it about the persons grammar
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Old 09-02-19, 04:11 PM
  #79  
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Originally Posted by Koyote View Post
fyi: In my case, the “root cause” of my back problems came in the form of a full-size 1992 Lexus sedan which rear-ended my subcompact at about 45 mph. But thanks for your input.
they have a fix for that too, It's called better driver training, better testing, Less drivers on the roads that are not qualified, or responsible enough for the "driving privilege".
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Old 09-02-19, 04:21 PM
  #80  
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Originally Posted by Metieval View Post
it isn't starving yourself with proper re-feeds.

that you see it as "starving" exhibits your ignorance (lack of knowledge) on fasting.
The way I see fasting, it's no different than self-flagellation...There is no good reason why a healthy physically active person who eats good diet should fast...Fasting is only for people who are very seriously ill and can't eat....or for people who are religious zealots seeking spiritual enlightenment.
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Old 09-02-19, 04:52 PM
  #81  
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Originally Posted by wolfchild View Post
The way I see fasting,
enough said then.

screw the research, all that matters is how you see it.
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Old 09-02-19, 05:04 PM
  #82  
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Originally Posted by Metieval View Post
Is that all you have? when all else fails, then make it about the persons grammar

Okay...So, you want to judge people for their physical problems, assuming that they are all self-inflicted through laziness, poor posture, lack of stretching and other exercise -- even though there are plenty of other reasons for each of the ailments that are mentioned. But you dislike being criticized for something that is well within your control -- grammar.

I think I understand you now.
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Old 09-02-19, 05:25 PM
  #83  
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Originally Posted by Koyote View Post
Okay...So, you want to judge people for their physical problems, assuming that they are all self-inflicted through laziness, poor posture, lack of stretching and other exercise -- even though there are plenty of other reasons for each of the ailments that are mentioned. But you dislike being criticized for something that is well within your control -- grammar.

I think I understand you now.
Never judged, just gave solutions to a better experience with the drop bar. I gave solutions to a better life for most people. They screamed and ranted for change but when it comes to personal change, no way!!! they Balk.

For a first world nation we have way too many self inflicted health issues. We are a carefree society, someone else will pick up our trash, and some lab will create a pill that fixes everything.

for recollection of quotes not mine!


Then I lost some more belly fat and began spending more time in the drops.
A big difference was losing the belly so I could pedal and breath easier.
It's true, I used my drop bars more and more as I lost most of my belly fat.
I also am getting more and more use out of the drops on my Toughroad, it's all a belly fat thing.
Though I was much skinnier back in the 90s, it was the excessive belly fat, resulting from 20-plus years of culturally-induced bad diets, that made it very hard for me to breathe reasonably well enough while on the drops of my decidedly not aggressive Raleigh Flyer.
It didn't matter that some of them were grossly overweight and lardy - the obese ones that couldn't possibly bend down just flipped the handlebars around to have the drops facing upwards.
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Old 09-02-19, 05:27 PM
  #84  
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I am sure they all had a belly because their Buick was rear ended by a Train though. Yes?
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Old 09-02-19, 05:46 PM
  #85  
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Originally Posted by sjanzeir View Post
Hey, if they work for you, that's just great. More power to you. They're just not for me.
It's interesting because I haven't heard anyone actually complain about using them. Seeing as there's no arguing taste so it's not a matter of right and wrong, what is it about brifters you don't like? Just curious.

I'm no fan of stem shifters, bar end shifters, downtube shifters, and barrel shifters. I won't even consider a bike with those.
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Old 09-02-19, 08:13 PM
  #86  
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Originally Posted by DynoD500_SR20-d View Post
I was riding today and I saw a guy with drops attached to his mountain bike straight bars.
Now I find myself in the hoods and the top of the bars most of the time. If I bought my bike with straight bars it would not look as "racy". So my question is, "Are drop bars an illusion?" for most of us riders who want to fit in?
No. It's just that you don't use them to their full potential. You might check your fit if you aren't comfortable using your drop bars in all the positions they offer, and therefore don't have all the advantages they offer over straight bars for riding on the road. Or if you don't need those advantages, get some straight bars and decide if they are more comfortable than riding on the hoods. I bet not.
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Old 09-02-19, 08:16 PM
  #87  
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Originally Posted by Metieval View Post
it doesn't help drop bars out any when people ride bikes that are too large for them.
Actually, I think a too-small bike is more likely to make the drops hard to use. The small frame has handlebars that are harder to adjust upward relative to the saddle, therefore the drops would probably require flexibility and fitness that most recreational riders don't have.

A too-large frame would allow the bars to be higher relative to the saddle, therefore probably easier to use the drops.
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Old 09-02-19, 09:07 PM
  #88  
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Originally Posted by Metieval View Post

a person can go from not being able to touch ankles to being able to touch toes in less than a week.
A BIG belly can be lost in 2 weeks, 4 weeks

.
BRB....going to grab a chocolate chip cookie while I read this thread...lol.....no.....seriously.
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Old 09-02-19, 09:51 PM
  #89  
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For some reason, I keep thinking about the ancient Greek myth of Procrustes.
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Old 09-02-19, 11:29 PM
  #90  
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Originally Posted by livedarklions View Post
It's interesting because I haven't heard anyone actually complain about using them. Seeing as there's no arguing taste so it's not a matter of right and wrong, what is it about brifters you don't like? Just curious.
An evil combination of tiny hands, poor (or poorly trained) hand-eye coordination, and too much complexity concentrated at the tips of too few fingers.

In the 10 days or so that I had the 2016 Trek 1.2, the two times that I took it out were straight out of a Harold Lloyd flick. Later that same year, I thought I should give myself another chance with this whole brifter business, so I went over to my sporting goods place and tried out a Fuji Sportif around the shop floor, just to see if my newly acquired briftophobia was real. I was on the bike for about 15 seconds when I crashed into a rack full of soccer T-shirts, right after I caught myself shifting gears instead of braking. To this day, I cringe at the thought of what might have happened if I had broken that Sportif's carbon fork! I was done. I went on to pick up my first new-old-stock 2014 Trek 7.6 FX and never looked back.

Maybe when I'm older and smarter.

Originally Posted by livedarklions View Post
I'm no fan of stem shifters, bar end shifters, downtube shifters, and barrel shifters. I won't even consider a bike with those.
I don't know about bar end shifters or barrel shifter (I had to Google that one and scroll deep down) but back when my old Raleigh Flyer was my primary mode of transportation in the 90s, I probably could've used a pair of stem shifters instead of the Raleigh's downtube shifters, since I was on the handlebar tops most of the time (that thing had suicide brake levers that I used a lot.)

With that being said, having trained myself to precisely select every gear with the old Raleigh's downtube friction shifters, it's a learned skill that I still cherish today, especially after I swapped out the factory five-speed freewheel for a seven-speed, which required me to be even more precise. But I was younger and smarter.

Last edited by sjanzeir; 09-03-19 at 05:18 AM.
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Old 09-03-19, 04:18 AM
  #91  
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Originally Posted by Metieval View Post
like i said making PE optional in school was detrimental.

no stretching, no exercise, sitting all day. (sitting is the new smoking)

years of muscle imbalance, along with years of restrictive shoes, poor diet, poor hydration, nutrient imbalance, and now we blame a bad back?

the same can be said for cycling if it the only means of exercise a person gets. Years of only cycling will be painful.

as for changing the body in 2-4 weeks is easy. especially stretching. Do you do it once a day, or 7 times a day?

just ditching the inflammatory foods, will change a persons size drastically in 2 weeks. even if the weight loss was minimal. and goes a long ways towards allowing the hips to rotate properly.

yeah I do feel sorry for a adults with back issues, foot issues, spine issues, neck issues. and I blame a society that is unwilling to look at the root cause.
I feel sorry for people that blame society for everything.
PE never burnt off any real amount of calories and nobody is experiencing drastic changes in appearance by doing nothing other than ditching inflammatory foods for two whole weeks

Last edited by downhillmaster; 09-03-19 at 05:59 AM.
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Old 09-03-19, 08:05 AM
  #92  
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Originally Posted by terrymorse View Post
Descending a steep mountain road on the hoods is foolhardy.

Hard braking on the hoods is risky.

If you never descend a steep and twisting road, and if you never expect to have to brake hard, then you can get away without using the drops.
If your brakes aren't set up properly, it's foolhardy but that has nothing to do with the location of the brake levers. I regularly hit 40 and even 50 mph on loaded touring bikes and I brake almost exclusively from the hoods. I've never failed to stop doing so. Even unloaded, I do a lot of mountain cycling and can hit the same speeds. It's just never been an issue.
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Old 09-03-19, 08:08 AM
  #93  
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Originally Posted by cyccommute View Post
If your brakes aren't set up properly, it's foolhardy but that has nothing to do with the location of the brake levers. I regularly hit 40 and even 50 mph on loaded touring bikes and I brake almost exclusively from the hoods. I've never failed to stop doing so. Even unloaded, I do a lot of mountain cycling and can hit the same speeds. It's just never been an issue.
+1. Like you, I am still alive.

BTW...OBTL.
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Old 09-03-19, 09:18 AM
  #94  
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Since shifters got brought up, is there a specific reason bar-ends are used on "true" touring bikes? Is it a case of "much easier to fix if it breaks in the middle of nowhere"?
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Old 09-03-19, 09:55 AM
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Originally Posted by cyccommute View Post
If your brakes aren't set up properly, it's foolhardy but that has nothing to do with the location of the brake levers. I regularly hit 40 and even 50 mph on loaded touring bikes and I brake almost exclusively from the hoods. I've never failed to stop doing so. Even unloaded, I do a lot of mountain cycling and can hit the same speeds. It's just never been an issue.
I sure hope you don't descend steep mountain roads on the hoods, simply because "it's never been an issue". Yet.
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Old 09-03-19, 10:30 AM
  #96  
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Originally Posted by terrymorse View Post
I sure hope you don't descend steep mountain roads on the hoods, simply because "it's never been an issue". Yet.
I have 2 words for you "Hydraulic Disk". There is a reason besides marketing they are being used more and more. Now you don't have to rely on leverage to brake.
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Old 09-03-19, 10:56 AM
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Originally Posted by Razorrock View Post
I have 2 words for you "Hydraulic Disk".
I have two words for you "pot hole". Hit those unexpectedly on a fast descent, and you'll be thankful you descend only in the drops.

I have three other words for you "center of gravity". It's lower when you're in the drops, so you can brake harder while staying in control.
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Old 09-03-19, 11:03 AM
  #98  
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Originally Posted by sheddle View Post
Since shifters got brought up, is there a specific reason bar-ends are used on "true" touring bikes? Is it a case of "much easier to fix if it breaks in the middle of nowhere"?
Generally true. Not so much "fix" as there's not much to fail, more a case of you can flip them to friction mode, so if you've problems with an out of wack R derailer, really dirty cable, etc... you can still shift.

Sheldon Brown (remember Sheldon ?) pretty much debunked the whole "brifters are no good for touring" argument a few decades ago, they usually do not fail and don't cause issues on a typical tour. Cross Africa ?, I'd want simple, but cross US ?, not an issue.

There's a whole thread on this here:

https://www.bikeforums.net/touring/1...ring-bike.html
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Old 09-03-19, 11:21 AM
  #99  
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Originally Posted by terrymorse View Post
I have two words for you "pot hole". Hit those unexpectedly on a fast descent, and you'll be thankful you descend only in the drops.

I have three other words for you "center of gravity". It's lower when you're in the drops, so you can break harder while staying in control.
That's a true statement, there have been more than a few times this has happened to me...not even on a decent but just going fast. I would also add "control" to the lower center of gravity.
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Old 09-03-19, 11:47 AM
  #100  
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"Nights in White Satin" is stuck in my head.

"But we decide which is right. And which is an illusion."
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