Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Road Cycling
Reload this Page >

80 psi too low for my 700x28 tires?

Notices
Road Cycling It is by riding a bicycle that you learn the contours of a country best, since you have to sweat up the hills and coast down them. Thus you remember them as they actually are, while in a motor car only a high hill impresses you, and you have no such accurate remembrance of country you have driven through as you gain by riding a bicycle. -- Ernest Hemingway

80 psi too low for my 700x28 tires?

Old 01-29-21, 12:39 AM
  #1  
Symox
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2020
Posts: 224

Bikes: '07 Specialized Roubaix Comp Triple, '12 Gravity Fixie, '21 Liv Rove 4, '06? Giant EB Spirit

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 117 Post(s)
Liked 48 Times in 36 Posts
80 psi too low for my 700x28 tires?

I have foldable Continental Gatorskins (I happen to love 'em but I'm sure there may be better options) in 700x28. Someone on this forum suggested running tires at a lower pressure to help with downhill riding. This suggestion literally changed my confidence in descents. I was running 23s at max pressure and the bike always felt glitchy and on the verge of losing control. With the 28s running at 80 psi it feels like a totally different bike - for the better!

The Continental website says 95-116 is the range for this particular tire. I weigh 155 lbs and haven't experienced pinch flat (knock on wood) with 80psi. I only ride on tarmac roads (no gravel) but there are occasional potholes that I do my best to avoid. Should I be concerned about running at this low a pressure? These are NOT the hardshell versions btw.

Thanks for your insight

Last edited by Symox; 01-29-21 at 12:40 AM. Reason: more detail
Symox is offline  
Likes For Symox:
Old 01-29-21, 01:05 AM
  #2  
Branko D
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2018
Posts: 252
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 86 Post(s)
Liked 90 Times in 57 Posts
It's fine. Lots of people run 28s at 80-ish psi. At your weight I wouldn't worry about pinch flats on 28s at that pressure.

28s at 80 psi are about the equivalent to running 23s at 90-95 psi in terms of suspension, huge difference from running 23s at max pressure.
Branko D is offline  
Likes For Branko D:
Old 01-29-21, 01:59 AM
  #3  
Symox
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2020
Posts: 224

Bikes: '07 Specialized Roubaix Comp Triple, '12 Gravity Fixie, '21 Liv Rove 4, '06? Giant EB Spirit

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 117 Post(s)
Liked 48 Times in 36 Posts
Originally Posted by Branko D View Post
It's fine. Lots of people run 28s at 80-ish psi. At your weight I wouldn't worry about pinch flats on 28s at that pressure.

28s at 80 psi are about the equivalent to running 23s at 90-95 psi in terms of suspension, huge difference from running 23s at max pressure.
thanks so much for your help! Good to know others ride 28s at this psi
Symox is offline  
Old 01-29-21, 06:48 AM
  #4  
datlas 
Beyond Bogus
 
datlas's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Malvern, PA (20 miles West of Philly)
Posts: 34,691

Bikes: 1986 Alpine (steel road bike), 2009 Ti Habenero, 2013 Specialized Roubaix

Mentioned: 483 Post(s)
Tagged: 2 Thread(s)
Quoted: 14457 Post(s)
Liked 2,829 Times in 1,439 Posts
Agree. I would suggest drop to 75F and 80-85R, but tweak to your conditions.
__________________
Originally Posted by rjones28 View Post
Addiction is all about class.
datlas is offline  
Likes For datlas:
Old 01-29-21, 07:15 AM
  #5  
burnthesheep
Newbie racer
 
Join Date: Feb 2018
Posts: 2,407

Bikes: Propel, red is faster

Mentioned: 32 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1091 Post(s)
Liked 874 Times in 572 Posts
Originally Posted by Symox View Post
I have foldable Continental Gatorskins (I happen to love 'em but I'm sure there may be better options) in 700x28. Someone on this forum suggested running tires at a lower pressure to help with downhill riding. This suggestion literally changed my confidence in descents. I was running 23s at max pressure and the bike always felt glitchy and on the verge of losing control. With the 28s running at 80 psi it feels like a totally different bike - for the better!

The Continental website says 95-116 is the range for this particular tire. I weigh 155 lbs and haven't experienced pinch flat (knock on wood) with 80psi. I only ride on tarmac roads (no gravel) but there are occasional potholes that I do my best to avoid. Should I be concerned about running at this low a pressure? These are NOT the hardshell versions btw.

Thanks for your insight
IMO 155lbs and 80psi on a 28mm tire is still WAY too much. Depending on your rim width. Either way, I would think for that size tire and your weight a 28mm you'd be down around 60-65 psi.

I run the wide road width HED wheels and run the front 23mm at like 82 and the rear 25mm at 72 or so.

For your weight, even for a narrow width rim, you wouldn't need to run those 23's at max pressure. Maybe 85psi.

If the 28's fit fine, keep running them. But, I think you would have been fine airing down on anything if you weigh only 155 and were at "max".

Ninja edit: I weigh 160, to qualify the similarity to your size and give those pressures.
burnthesheep is offline  
Likes For burnthesheep:
Old 01-29-21, 07:21 AM
  #6  
MoAlpha
 
MoAlpha's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Location: Land of Pleasant Living
Posts: 8,003

Bikes: Shmikes

Mentioned: 48 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5938 Post(s)
Liked 2,626 Times in 1,452 Posts
I agree with the above, but if one were to be pedantic they would ask about the internal diameter of your rims, since that has a significant effect on effective tire volume. I weigh in the low 140s and currently ride 25 mm tires on 18 and 21 mm internal dia. rims at 75/70 and 70/65, respectively, with no problems.
MoAlpha is offline  
Old 01-29-21, 07:29 AM
  #7  
Symox
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2020
Posts: 224

Bikes: '07 Specialized Roubaix Comp Triple, '12 Gravity Fixie, '21 Liv Rove 4, '06? Giant EB Spirit

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 117 Post(s)
Liked 48 Times in 36 Posts
Rims

Several have mentioned rim width. Im using Mavic Open Pros which have an outer width of 19.6mm. Inner width is 15mm according to web search

Last edited by Symox; 01-29-21 at 07:38 AM.
Symox is offline  
Old 01-29-21, 08:15 AM
  #8  
MoAlpha
 
MoAlpha's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Location: Land of Pleasant Living
Posts: 8,003

Bikes: Shmikes

Mentioned: 48 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5938 Post(s)
Liked 2,626 Times in 1,452 Posts
Originally Posted by Symox View Post
Several have mentioned rim width. Im using Mavic Open Pros which have an outer width of 19.6mm. Inner width is 15mm according to web search
Narrow, so recommended pressure would be on the high side, but per above, you're fine.
MoAlpha is offline  
Likes For MoAlpha:
Old 01-29-21, 08:55 AM
  #9  
mdarnton
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Location: Chicago
Posts: 115

Bikes: nothing to brag about

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 35 Post(s)
Liked 88 Times in 48 Posts
I weigh 170 and was running 28s at 75 front, 65 rear all last summer, no problem. That's for big-city street. Previously I ran 90, but the new plan rides a LOT smoother!
mdarnton is offline  
Likes For mdarnton:
Old 01-29-21, 09:15 AM
  #10  
DaveSSS 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Loveland, CO
Posts: 6,282

Bikes: TWO Cinelli superstar disc with SRAM Force AXS

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 604 Post(s)
Liked 264 Times in 213 Posts
ZIPP has a pressure calculator for tubeless tires on their website. https://axs.sram.com/guides/tire/pressure
Silca has one too. https://info.silca.cc/silca-professi...ure-calculator

Unfortunately, pump gauges can be quite inaccurate. My old silca pump was reading about 8 psi higher than a calibrated reference gauge, so my actual tire pressure was a lot lower than I thought it to be. Without an accurate gage, a pressure calculator isn't valuable.
DaveSSS is offline  
Old 01-29-21, 09:20 AM
  #11  
datlas 
Beyond Bogus
 
datlas's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Malvern, PA (20 miles West of Philly)
Posts: 34,691

Bikes: 1986 Alpine (steel road bike), 2009 Ti Habenero, 2013 Specialized Roubaix

Mentioned: 483 Post(s)
Tagged: 2 Thread(s)
Quoted: 14457 Post(s)
Liked 2,829 Times in 1,439 Posts
Originally Posted by DaveSSS View Post
ZIPP has a pressure calculator for tubeless tires on their website. https://axs.sram.com/guides/tire/pressure
Silca has one too. https://info.silca.cc/silca-professi...ure-calculator

Unfortunately, pump gauges can be quite inaccurate. My old silca pump was reading about 8 psi higher than a calibrated reference gauge, so my actual tire pressure was a lot lower than I thought it to be. Without an accurate gage, a pressure calculator isn't valuable.
OP not running tubeless.

Common newbie and not-so-newbie mistake is to pump up tires high. One of my friends is riding 28mm at 110PSI. I suggested he might want to drop his pressures and he gave me a look like I was crazy. And this is a long-standing "serious" cyclist.
__________________
Originally Posted by rjones28 View Post
Addiction is all about class.
datlas is offline  
Old 01-29-21, 09:29 AM
  #12  
merlinextraligh
pan y agua
 
merlinextraligh's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Jacksonville
Posts: 30,750

Bikes: Willier Zero 7; Merlin Extralight; Calfee Dragonfly tandem, Calfee Adventure tandem; Cervelo P2; Motebecane Ti Fly 29er; Motebecanne Phantom Cross; Schwinn Paramount Track bike

Mentioned: 15 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1113 Post(s)
Liked 235 Times in 126 Posts
Our tandem team weighs more than twice the OP, and the Silca calculator only recommends 87 psi for 28mm on the tandem.

Basically, for optimal comfort and reasonable rolling resistance, you want to run pretty much the lowest pressure you can. The limits on going too low, are 1), as noted pinch flats, and 2) the tire squirming. If you’re not getting pinch flats, and the tire doesn’t squirm as you corner, then in all likelihood your pressure isn’t too low.

You can get more scientific, calculate the pressure that gives you the “ideal” amount of drop, research rolling resistance for your tire with various combinations of rider weight and pressure. But if the bike rides well, doesn’t squirm and doesn’t pinch flat, you really don’t need to sweat it further.
__________________
You could fall off a cliff and die.
You could get lost and die.
You could hit a tree and die.
OR YOU COULD STAY HOME AND FALL OFF THE COUCH AND DIE.
merlinextraligh is offline  
Likes For merlinextraligh:
Old 01-29-21, 09:37 AM
  #13  
DaveSSS 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Loveland, CO
Posts: 6,282

Bikes: TWO Cinelli superstar disc with SRAM Force AXS

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 604 Post(s)
Liked 264 Times in 213 Posts
The silca calculator doesn't specify tubed or tubeless, but the recommended pressure is a lot higher than the zipp tubeless, so it must be for tubed tires.
DaveSSS is offline  
Old 01-29-21, 01:24 PM
  #14  
Carbonfiberboy 
just another gosling
 
Carbonfiberboy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Everett, WA
Posts: 17,356

Bikes: CoMo Speedster 2003, Trek 5200, CAAD 9, Fred 2004

Mentioned: 106 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2905 Post(s)
Liked 810 Times in 608 Posts
I'm going to go the other way and say *definitely* abide by the manufacturer's pressure recommendations. If it says 95, run 95. There was a guy over on the tandem forum who blew his tires doing exactly this, running 80 on these tires. The rims apparently wore through the sidewalls and the bead separated from the sidewall, right at the edge of the rim. Those recs are for a reason. We many not know what it is, but best to abide by it.

BTW, IME a 28mm tire on a Open Pro rim is not a good choice for superior cornering, though fine on a wide rim. On Open Pro rims, 23mm Conti 4000IIs or 5000 are the best modern tires for fast descending. At 155 lbs. on my recced tires, run 80 front, 100 rear. I checked my stock of Conti 5000 tires, and neither the 23 nor the 28 show a minimum pressure in the sidewall. That's interesting.

Further along that line of interesting things is that the Conti website no long shows a minimum pressure for any tire, at least not that I could find, contrary to the OP. Is no minimum pressure now a thing for bike tires? All tires used to have a range on the sidewall.
__________________
Results matter
Carbonfiberboy is offline  
Likes For Carbonfiberboy:
Old 01-29-21, 01:53 PM
  #15  
billridesbikes
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2019
Posts: 427
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 167 Post(s)
Liked 247 Times in 150 Posts
I have 28mm on my road bike. I like 75psi front and 80psi rear if the roads are nice and smooth, and if I expect lots of rough chip seal or gravel maybe a little lower 70F/75R. I’m 150lbs and this seems to work for me although some charts say I should run lower. I have never gotten a pinch flat with this configuration (~10,000 miles).
billridesbikes is online now  
Old 01-29-21, 02:02 PM
  #16  
burnthesheep
Newbie racer
 
Join Date: Feb 2018
Posts: 2,407

Bikes: Propel, red is faster

Mentioned: 32 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1091 Post(s)
Liked 874 Times in 572 Posts
Don't run out and buy stuff just because BF mentions something, but going a bit more volume in the rim however you achieve that (usually wider rim) it makes a difference.

I used to run 23/25 combo on my Propel with the original narrower PSLR aero wheels. Good wheels with DT hubs, but I wanted lower psi and more comfort. I bought some HED 6+ and running the same 23/25 combo was able to go down over 10psi less. Plus the volume in general felt nicer. As soon as I stop being lazy and install my new TT tires on the disc/deep front for that bike, the GP5000 25mm that's on the back of those will replace the 23 on the front HED 6+ wheel for a little more comfort and a hair of CRR gain.

Even if you can find some cheaper wheels with more volume/width........it makes larger tires feel even better.
burnthesheep is offline  
Old 01-29-21, 02:20 PM
  #17  
HTupolev
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: Seattle
Posts: 3,740
Mentioned: 38 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1708 Post(s)
Liked 778 Times in 392 Posts
Originally Posted by Carbonfiberboy View Post
I'm going to go the other way and say *definitely* abide by the manufacturer's pressure recommendations. If it says 95, run 95.
BTW, IME a 28mm tire on a Open Pro rim is not a good choice for superior cornering, though fine on a wide rim. On Open Pro rims, 23mm Conti 4000IIs or 5000 are the best modern tires for fast descending. At 155 lbs. on my recced tires, run 80 front, 100 rear. I checked my stock of Conti 5000 tires, and neither the 23 nor the 28 show a minimum pressure in the sidewall. That's interesting.
Neither do Gatorskins. But there is a minimum PSI on the box. For 23 GP5000, Continental specs a minimum PSI of 110.



Those recs are for a reason.
They usually are not, or at least not any reason based on anything that the user has any reason to care about. For example, previous-gen Vittoria tires had very high pressure minimums that were based on meeting ETRTO drop requirements when a bicycle was as heavily-loaded as Vittoria could imagine a bicycle being. Like, the logic was literally "you need to pump 100PSI into your 27mm tires because, if you use less than that and a tall morbidly obese guy sneaks up and rides off with your bicycle, the amount that the tires are deforming underneath him might be in violation of ETRTO specifications."

From a safety standpoint, what can go wrong with low pressure is if the tire doesn't manage to seat properly (which is so rim-and-setup-dependent that a single PSI number is useless), or if the tires are being run at such extreme drop that the amount of deformation is chewing up the casing (which is totally load-dependent and, for 28mm tires under a 155lb rider like the OP, would tend to involve massively less than the 80PSI they're looking at).

Last edited by HTupolev; 01-29-21 at 02:29 PM.
HTupolev is offline  
Likes For HTupolev:
Old 01-29-21, 02:30 PM
  #18  
datlas 
Beyond Bogus
 
datlas's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Malvern, PA (20 miles West of Philly)
Posts: 34,691

Bikes: 1986 Alpine (steel road bike), 2009 Ti Habenero, 2013 Specialized Roubaix

Mentioned: 483 Post(s)
Tagged: 2 Thread(s)
Quoted: 14457 Post(s)
Liked 2,829 Times in 1,439 Posts
Originally Posted by HTupolev View Post
Neither do Gatorskins. But there is a minimum PSI on the box. For 23 GP5000, Continental specs a minimum PSI of 110.




They usually are not, or at least not any reason based on anything that the user has any reason to care about. For example, previous-gen Vittoria tires had very high pressure minimums that were based on meeting ETRTO drop requirements when a bicycle was as heavily-loaded as Vittoria could imagine a bicycle being. Like, the logic was literally "you need to pump 100PSI into your 27mm tires because, if you use less than that and a tall morbidly obese guy sneaks up and rides off with your bicycle, the amount that the tires are deforming underneath him might be in violation of ETRTO specifications."

From a safety standpoint, what can go wrong with low pressure is if the tire doesn't manage to seat properly (which is so rim-and-setup-dependent that a single PSI number is useless), or if the tires are being run at such extreme drop that the amount of sidewall deformation is chewing up the casing (which is totally load-dependent and, for 28mm tires under a 155lb rider like the OP, would involve massively less than the 80PSI they're looking at).
Are you sure those lower PSI numbers on the CONTI box are MINIMUM or maybe just "recommended?" I see where it says MAX for the maximum but I don't see MIN anywhere.
__________________
Originally Posted by rjones28 View Post
Addiction is all about class.
datlas is offline  
Old 01-29-21, 02:38 PM
  #19  
HTupolev
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: Seattle
Posts: 3,740
Mentioned: 38 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1708 Post(s)
Liked 778 Times in 392 Posts
Originally Posted by datlas View Post
Are you sure those lower PSI numbers on the CONTI box are MINIMUM or maybe just "recommended?" I see where it says MAX for the maximum but I don't see MIN anywhere.
Good point. Continental has a page on their website with a nice straight answer.

We usually recommend choosing a pressure level somewhere between the recommended and the maximum pressure.


They recommend choosing pressures higher than the recommended pressure.

HTupolev is offline  
Likes For HTupolev:
Old 01-29-21, 03:41 PM
  #20  
Symox
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2020
Posts: 224

Bikes: '07 Specialized Roubaix Comp Triple, '12 Gravity Fixie, '21 Liv Rove 4, '06? Giant EB Spirit

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 117 Post(s)
Liked 48 Times in 36 Posts
Originally Posted by mdarnton View Post
I weigh 170 and was running 28s at 75 front, 65 rear all last summer, no problem. That's for big-city street. Previously I ran 90, but the new plan rides a LOT smoother!
Wow, you aren't kidding. Just tried 70 and then 60. Like a whole different set of tires!! I'll probably settle on 70 ish

Why do you run lower pressure in the rear?

Why am I only now finding out about this?
Symox is offline  
Likes For Symox:
Old 01-29-21, 04:12 PM
  #21  
Sy Reene
Advocatus Diaboli
 
Sy Reene's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: Wherever I am
Posts: 6,734

Bikes: Merlin Cyrene, Nashbar steel CX

Mentioned: 11 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3496 Post(s)
Liked 713 Times in 489 Posts
Originally Posted by DaveSSS View Post
The silca calculator doesn't specify tubed or tubeless, but the recommended pressure is a lot higher than the zipp tubeless, so it must be for tubed tires.
AFAIK, there's no theoretical difference in optimal air pressure for a tubed vs TL tire, excluding the possibilities that:
1. With a tubed setup, if the ideal pressure gets to too low of a value, you may be more likely to experience a pinch flat, or
2. With a TL setup, typically rim makers specify a MAX pressure that is lower for TL than for tubed, so if for whatever reason you need a high pressure, you might be top-end limited with TL tire.

Otherwise, if you're somewhere in the middle, the 'ideal' pressure for your circumstances shouldn't vary between a TL and tubed setup.
Sy Reene is offline  
Old 01-29-21, 04:21 PM
  #22  
surak
Senior Member
 
surak's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2017
Location: Seattle
Posts: 1,328

Bikes: Specialized Roubaix, Canyon Inflite AL SLX, Priority Continuum Onyx, Santana Vision, Kent Dual-Drive Tandem

Mentioned: 18 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 550 Post(s)
Liked 373 Times in 210 Posts
Gatorskins aren't what I consider a supple tire (if there's data to quantify this, I'll be happy to be corrected) so you won't necessarily gain much by dropping your tire pressure lower. I noticed it only felt more sluggish when I used them, one of the reasons I ditched mine quickly.

From https://www.renehersecycles.com/tire...ure-take-home/ :
Higher pressure decreases the energy required to flex the tire. Less energy is lost due to internal deformation (hysteresis). But higher pressure increases the losses due to the vibrations of bike and rider. More energy goes to suspension losses. The two effects cancel each other. Whether you pump up your supple tires super-hard or ride them squishy-soft, they have the same resistance.

On the other hand, truly stiff tires feel sluggish at 15% tire drop. The stiff tire is much harder to flex, so its useful to minimize that flex by increasing the pressure. For stiff tires, the suspension losses do not vary as much with pressure theyre always high since the stiff casing transmits a lot of vibration at any pressure.
surak is offline  
Likes For surak:
Old 01-29-21, 04:23 PM
  #23  
Blues
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2020
Location: Cabarrus County, North Carolina, USA
Posts: 20

Bikes: Geezer Road, road, cruise, gravel, mountain

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 7 Times in 6 Posts
Being an 185 pound older guy suffering from a lot of wear, a smooth ride is the only option or I would not be able to ride at all. I have folding 28mm Gaterskins with tubes on my R-300 Cannondale, probably the biggest tires I can fit on it. Without my body complaining, the highest pressures I am able to run on my local not-so-smooth roads are 40 psi front and 45 psi rear. I am not racing, just trying to keep in shape on these hills. I do ride regular, but I don't ride the mileages a lot of you guys do, and I have not noticed the bike being sluggish or squirrelly at all.

My ideal Geezer Road Ride has 40mm tires which I run at 35 psi front and 40 psi rear.

Someone is probably going to jump my case about my pressures, but hey, they work for me and might work for someone else. For me it's a matter of riding or not.

Fred
Blues is offline  
Old 01-29-21, 06:04 PM
  #24  
MoAlpha
 
MoAlpha's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Location: Land of Pleasant Living
Posts: 8,003

Bikes: Shmikes

Mentioned: 48 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5938 Post(s)
Liked 2,626 Times in 1,452 Posts
Originally Posted by surak View Post
Gatorskins aren't what I consider a supple tire (if there's data to quantify this, I'll be happy to be corrected) so you won't necessarily gain much by dropping your tire pressure lower. I noticed it only felt more sluggish when I used them, one of the reasons I ditched mine quickly.

From https://www.renehersecycles.com/tire...ure-take-home/ :
Indeed and I believe those data exist. I was going to comment to that effect, but Gatorskins have been beat up on elsewhere here. GP 4 Seasons (?) are a much nicer compromise in terms of both ride and handling.
MoAlpha is offline  
Old 01-29-21, 06:10 PM
  #25  
mdarnton
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Location: Chicago
Posts: 115

Bikes: nothing to brag about

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 35 Post(s)
Liked 88 Times in 48 Posts
I miswrote....higher pressure in the rear! Sorry.
Yup, big difference.

Originally Posted by Symox View Post
Wow, you aren't kidding. Just tried 70 and then 60. Like a whole different set of tires!! I'll probably settle on 70 ish

Why do you run lower pressure in the rear?

Why am I only now finding out about this?
mdarnton is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.