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Buying a Dutch style bike in the US?

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Buying a Dutch style bike in the US?

Old 02-15-21, 02:50 PM
  #51  
Billhpeloton
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Theyíre out there.

Doesnít hurt to watch Craigslist and FB Marketplace. I found a Gazelle Orange, in like new condition, for $235. 7-spd Nexus, generator lights, racks, full chain guard, etc The seller had purchased it at a garage sale. I assume from someone who had moved here from abroad. Itís a beautiful bike if used for itís designed purpose.
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Old 02-15-21, 03:27 PM
  #52  
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Originally Posted by surak View Post
Priority has some options, slightly out of the OP's $500 max, but they do have sales every now and then. The Priority Classic I bought, with fenders, rack, and front brake add-ons, didn't cost much more than that a few years back.

It got me back into cycling, but I ended up not riding it much after learning that the 3-speed upright tank style of bike (weight-wise it's under 30 lb, but handling is another story) wasn't that useful to get around non-flat Seattle. I realized that I much preferred to get to my destination as quickly as possible under my own power, because frankly there are hardly any bike routes connecting places people need to go (i.e., commutes and shopping) that are pleasant enough to enjoy at a leisurely pace.
I'm diggin' the Gates drive. If I were to get a super-casual bike for family rides and grocery gettin', I'd wouldn't want to add too much maintenance, so the Gates would be a welcomed differentiator.
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Old 02-15-21, 03:55 PM
  #53  
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Originally Posted by WhyFi View Post
I'm diggin' the Gates drive. If I were to get a super-casual bike for family rides and grocery gettin', I'd wouldn't want to add too much maintenance, so the Gates would be a welcomed differentiator.
The belt-drive was a big point for me as a novice who knew exactly one thing about bike maintenance (how to pump tires... up to the max PSI written on the tire label ) before getting the Classic. I bought one for my wife too and we even did a short gravel excursion on them, but then she discovered that tandems were more enjoyable because they gave her a built-in motor -- me -- so no more casual rides with the Classics.
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Old 04-06-21, 12:18 PM
  #54  
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Originally Posted by Iride01 View Post
The one main thing you'll see in the so called dutch style bike is that the crankset is further forward in relation to the saddle. This is pretty much what the true cruiser style bike is... IMO. It makes for comfortable upright seating on a big comfy saddle for short rides around town or to the city park.

The bike industry confused everyone years ago when they came out with hybrids. People somehow mistakenly got the idea that hybrids were the thing for comfortable upright leisurely riding and cruisers sort of went out of the main stream for a while.

The Electra from trek as someone else posted comes in every conceivable configuration and component offering for a cruiser. They start at some pretty low prices for a basic coaster brake or single speed freewheel with rim brakes.
Keep in mind that the man who created this video move from Toronto—a city with plenty of hills that is 243 square miles big—to Amsterdam which is under 85 and it flat as an board, aside from the smattering of canal bridges. On a Dutch bike going 10 miles per hour(typical Dutch speed), you could go from the westernmost part of Nieuw-West to the Oude Kerk(6.9 miles) in 30 minutes. A ride on that same bike from Clairville to Toronto City Hall at that speed will take 1 hour and 43 minutes. Dutch cities are nowhere near as sprawled out as those in the US and Canada. and 95% of the country is flat as a board. I don't know how big(in square miles) or how hilly the OP's city is, but it's worth consideration.

Last edited by satrain18; 04-06-21 at 12:28 PM.
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Old 04-06-21, 12:27 PM
  #55  
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Originally Posted by satrain18 View Post
Keep in mind that the man who created this video move from Toronto—a city with plenty of hills that is 243 square miles big—to Amsterdam which is under 85 and it flat as an board, aside from the smattering of canal bridges. On a Dutch bike going 10 miles per hour(typical Dutch speed), you could go from the westernmost part of Nieuw-West to the Oude Kerk(6.9 miles) in 30 minutes. A ride on that same bike from Clairville to Toronto City Hall at that speed will take 1 hour and 43 minutes. Dutch cities are nowhere near as sprawled out as those in the US and Canada. and 95% of the country is flat as a board. But still, we do (badly)need better and safer cycling infrastructure and laws that imposes harsher penalties on reckless motorists.
I didn't see where the OP stated that they had any speed requirements or that they had a particular distance they had to travel in a certain time.

I see people riding their bikes at 10 mph or less on the level spots where I'm at. They seem to enjoy being that slow. I've haven't a clue how far or how long they are going to ride.

The gearing on the bikes I suggested will more than overcome the average hill for most people. Assuming they'll shift to the lower ratio gears which way too many I see out never do. I saw a couple people walking up a hill last year. They were in the high ratio gears and had plenty of lower ratio gears left .

Last edited by Iride01; 04-06-21 at 12:32 PM.
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Old 04-07-21, 06:54 AM
  #56  
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There's a Dutch bike for every discipline ya know.

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