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Drywall Anchors for bike rack

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Drywall Anchors for bike rack

Old 04-23-19, 02:15 PM
  #1  
rgr555
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Drywall Anchors for bike rack

Hi I'm wondering how many of you are using dry wall anchors for your bike rack. Since the stud is off-center I will need dry wall anchors.

The ones I purchased were recommended https://smile.amazon.com/ITW-Brands-...ct_top?ie=UTF8
For this bike rack: https://smile.amazon.com/gp/product/...?ie=UTF8&psc=1

The zinc screws are rated for 50lbs per job. The bike is no more than 25lbs. I'm just paranoid it will rip out of my walls or fall. There are mixed reviews, some people say "don't hang on dry wall", others say "get good dry wall anchors and it'll be fine". What do you guys think?
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Old 04-23-19, 02:32 PM
  #2  
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Those will probably work fine but if it were me, I'd cut a piece of 1/4 or 1/2" plywood that I can screw into the studs and then put the racks on that.
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Old 04-23-19, 02:41 PM
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I mounted a similar bicycle rack/hanger to drywall using the heavy-duty "expanding" style of anchor. Works great - no problems.
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Old 04-23-19, 02:56 PM
  #4  
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Originally Posted by Ogsarg View Post
Those will probably work fine but if it were me, I'd cut a piece of 1/4 or 1/2" plywood that I can screw into the studs and then put the racks on that.
Second this. It's just safer and more secure. Why take chances with a multi thousand dollar bicycle? My bike gets hung by the wheels from large padded hooks screwed into the ceiling studs of my garage.
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Old 04-23-19, 02:59 PM
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If I was hanging a bike rack on drywall I'd probably go with toggle bolts - but I tend to overdo things... or the board/studs across approach above.

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Old 04-23-19, 04:01 PM
  #6  
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If you were bent on doing a direct-to-wall mount, posts #3 and #5 are the way to go. If you really want security, mount a piece of plywood to the studs.
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Old 04-23-19, 04:09 PM
  #7  
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Originally Posted by MSchott View Post
Second this. It's just safer and more secure. Why take chances with a multi thousand dollar bicycle? My bike gets hung by the wheels from large padded hooks screwed into the ceiling studs of my garage.
Third this. I do tend to over engineer though.
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Old 04-23-19, 04:34 PM
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Do you live in earthquake country? Here in SoCal I try to consider how things will behave when bouncing. I'd go with the other suggestions about mounting wood to the studs. I did this with the hooks in my garage that needed to land between two ceiling joists.

Last edited by jimincalif; 04-23-19 at 04:38 PM.
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Old 04-23-19, 04:42 PM
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Thanks for the tips.

Going to get two Ez Anchor Toggle Bolts for 100lbs which actually provide up to 180lbs.
More than enough for 25lb.

This is for an entryway in a condo (minimalist) so dry wall anchor only way to go.

If anyone has gone this route and still had the bike rack fail please let me know! I just don't understand the risk of a 25lb bike on a mount that can hang 180lb on dry wall.
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Old 04-23-19, 09:02 PM
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Drywall anchors pretty much suck, 'tho they have their place.

If you screw a nice 1x board across the wall, the rack can go where it needs to,

and it will be easier to patch the holes if you remove it later.
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Old 04-24-19, 01:17 AM
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You're going to feel really stupid when someone bumps your hanging bike and rips the anchors through the drywall. Just because they are rated for more than the bike weight doesn't mean they are appropriate.
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Old 04-24-19, 01:41 AM
  #12  
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Originally Posted by rgr555 View Post

https://youtu.be/lHb-Tcvkn7M?t=945

This is for an entryway in a condo (minimalist) so dry wall anchor only way to go.
While I'm not a big fan of drywall anchors I do use them quite a lot for work. This video is very informative, thanks for sharing it.
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Old 04-24-19, 04:58 AM
  #13  
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Originally Posted by MSchott View Post
Second this. It's just safer and more secure. Why take chances with a multi thousand dollar bicycle? My bike gets hung by the wheels from large padded hooks screwed into the ceiling studs of my garage.
Ditto - just run a cheap 1x2 or 2x4 horizontally across the garage wall where you want to hang the bikes, screwed in at the studs, and put the hangers wherever you like along the board.
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Old 04-24-19, 05:17 AM
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Originally Posted by jpescatore View Post
Ditto - just run a cheap 1x2 or 2x4 horizontally across the garage wall where you want to hang the bikes, screwed in at the studs, and put the hangers wherever you like along the board.
Another vote for this, it's what we do when we hang kitchen presses ("cabinets" for Americans), and you can literally swing off them if you like. Make whatever holes are necessary (poking holes with a screwdriver is sufficient for this) to find the studs; then plaster, sand, and paint afterwards if you're doing this where it'll be seen and needs to be "nice" when finished.
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Old 04-24-19, 06:13 AM
  #15  
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Originally Posted by rgr555 View Post
I just don't understand the risk of a 25lb bike on a mount that can hang 180lb on dry wall.
It's not the weight that's a problem, so much as the non-static nature - you're going to be constantly hanging, removing and jostling the bike/rack and each of these micro-aggravations are going to dig the anchors further in to what is essentially a paper-lined sedimentary substance. It'll be fine for a year and it might be fine for three years, but there's not much of an excuse for not doing it right when all it takes is a plywood board, some screws and a drill (and maybe a paint roller if you're concerned about the appearance).
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Old 04-24-19, 06:35 AM
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Originally Posted by C9H13N View Post
You're going to feel really stupid when someone bumps your hanging bike and rips the anchors through the drywall. Just because they are rated for more than the bike weight doesn't mean they are appropriate.
This is sort of what I was thinking---overbuild for the worst possible scenario, not the norm.

I wouldn't have said "stupid," but I know when I hung racks for my bikes I made them tough enough that i could do pull-ups in them---if I didn't weigh so much--because if I slipped or tripped while hanging a bike and ended up pulling down several .... I would feel pretty stupid.
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Old 04-24-19, 07:03 AM
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You could use the best designed wall anchor in the world, and still be greatly limited by the fact that the anchor is inserted into what is essentially compressed chalk between two sheets of paper. Sure, the anchor is rated to whatever weight it claims, but 1/2" sheetrock on 16" centers will fail (in the best case scenario, with a big anchor) around 50lbs.

Drywall anchors are great for things like picture frames and mirrors. I wouldn't hang a coat rack on drywall anchors, much less a bicycle.
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Old 04-24-19, 07:15 AM
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will the back wheel be off the ground?
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Old 04-24-19, 09:03 AM
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Ugh - just don't.

Face mount a piece of wood across the span between the studs and just mount your rack to the wood.
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Old 04-24-19, 09:12 AM
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Originally Posted by WhyFi View Post
It's not the weight that's a problem, so much as the non-static nature - you're going to be constantly hanging, removing and jostling the bike/rack and each of these micro-aggravations are going to dig the anchors further in to what is essentially a paper-lined sedimentary substance. It'll be fine for a year and it might be fine for three years, but there's not much of an excuse for not doing it right when all it takes is a plywood board, some screws and a drill (and maybe a paint roller if you're concerned about the appearance).
Quite right. Think curtain rods, towel racks and TP holders. None are terribly heavy but they frequently end up loose because of the repeated pulling on them over time.
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Old 04-24-19, 09:12 AM
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That and also wear and tear simply from constant cycles of hanging/removing of bike.

Originally Posted by C9H13N View Post
You're going to feel really stupid when someone bumps your hanging bike and rips the anchors through the drywall. Just because they are rated for more than the bike weight doesn't mean they are appropriate.
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Old 04-24-19, 11:28 AM
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I'll um... eleventh what the others said - mount a 1x4 to the studs, put the bike hook(s) wherever you want on that board.


Last edited by Zaskar; 04-24-19 at 11:32 AM.
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Old 04-24-19, 12:01 PM
  #23  
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+1 for comment #2
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Old 04-24-19, 05:10 PM
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With all the advice here it seems like dry wall anchors, even toggle ones which can hold 200+ pounds, may be too risky and create wear over time on the dry wall.

So I may just angle the bike on a tilt while hung on the stud. The stud 8.5 inches from the wall, and half my bike handle is 10 inches, so there is not enough room unless I tilt the bike. Do you guys know if I can angle the bike on a tilt while hanging it vertically on this specific bike rack without damaging the wheel? (Like tilting your head to the right 10 degrees.)

http://www.racorstoragesolutions.com...-1r-01/288/302

Last edited by rgr555; 04-24-19 at 05:19 PM.
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Old 04-24-19, 05:44 PM
  #25  
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I have a trike that hangs from the garage ceiling over the front of my car. There is no way I would rely on any wall anchor to safely keep the trike from falling on the car. A cheap solution is to go to a home center like Lowes and buy dog eared fence boards for $1.87 (Item # 54224 Model # 146973) . It's 1" X 6" X 6'. That's plenty long enough to anchor it to two adjacent studs with a couple of deck screws. It will hold a bike hoist or the usual bike hooks.
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