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Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg) Looking to lose that spare tire? Ideal weight 200+? Frustrated being a large cyclist in a sport geared for the ultra-light? Learn about the bikes and parts that can take the abuse of a heavier cyclist, how to keep your body going while losing the weight, and get support from others who've been successful.

Hello/Intro/Looking for advice

Old 10-30-19, 12:09 PM
  #1  
Sertsa
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Hello/Intro/Looking for advice

Hi all,
I've been reading this forum quite a bit and have found it both helpful and a little overwhelming with as much as is now available. So I'll try to give a brief synopsis of my situation and plans, should any of you have advice.

- I am 53, 6'2", a man, and currently weigh 265 lbs. I'm working on the weight and have progressed quite a bit. In May, 2018, I weighed 440 lbs. It hurts to admit that, but yeah. I'm hoping to be under 250 by year's end and near my goal weight of 190 around next summer.
- I'd like to start riding a bike again, but it's been about 30 years. I've been hiking/walking a lot as well as spending quite a bit of time on an exercise bike.
- Some of my weight ballooning started after a hiking accident a number of years ago followed by a botched surgery and long hospitalization. There were other contributing factors, but mostly it was my being stupid. A lingering issue, however, is that I twist one foot out a bit when walking and on the exercise bike. Using the pedal strap on the exercise bike helps, but I have to be careful not to hit the bar with my heel.
- I was originally thinking of getting a bike next spring, but I'm being increasingly tempted to get one for at least a few fall rides. Until recently, however, I was too embarrassed to consider stepping foot in a bike shop.
- I do not plan to ride on roads, even though I live in a rural area. I had some close calls 30 years ago with aggressive and distracted drivers, and it seems to have gotten worse (and vehicles larger). Fortunately there are a couple rail trails in the area and a few parks with some nice gravel and dirt bike trails.
- So I'm intrigued and a bit overwhelmed by the available options. From what I've read so far I'm currently thinking about a hybrid, gravel bike, or possibly rigid mountain bike. I'm even more confused with pedal option, especially given the lingering foot issue. And I'm hesitant to walk into a bike shop, as even with the progress so far I'm still an obese, middle-aged man.

So, any advice? Hellos? Diet/weight loss discussion? Thanks!
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Old 10-30-19, 03:46 PM
  #2  
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Welcome

Noticed your post had gone unanswered for a few hours.

Welcome to the Forum!
I'm also new here and back on the bike after many years in an attempt to further/speed along (pun intended) my own weight loss.

I'd suggest going a couple of local bike stores, finding something you like, is in budget, comfortable, and returning to the forum for opinions on your selection prior to purchase.

I hate to see the new guy's post go unanswered, but seeing as you didn't ask a specific question, responses tend to be a little slower.

All the best

Barry
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Old 10-30-19, 04:13 PM
  #3  
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Don't worry about the bike shop. I bought two bikes in the last three years at a weight near yours. Ask questions about the different bikes. Maybe look at the manufacturers websites to get some idea of what bikes you'll see. Another thought is to look at used bikes but be very vigilant at getting one that fits.

A thought about the twisting foot would be to get a clip for that pedal and leave the other foot loose.
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Old 10-30-19, 05:07 PM
  #4  
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Rigid mtb with flat pedals. A durable bike with easy gearing. Bike shops get all sorts of customers. If you don't act like a dick they will appreciate your business. Enjoy!
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Old 10-30-19, 10:37 PM
  #5  
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Originally Posted by Barry2 View Post
Noticed your post had gone unanswered for a few hours.

Welcome to the Forum!
I'm also new here and back on the bike after many years in an attempt to further/speed along (pun intended) my own weight loss.

I'd suggest going a couple of local bike stores, finding something you like, is in budget, comfortable, and returning to the forum for opinions on your selection prior to purchase.

I hate to see the new guy's post go unanswered, but seeing as you didn't ask a specific question, responses tend to be a little slower.

All the best

Barry
Thanks. I'll need to try a few shops to get more specific questions, but I wanted to see if anyone had general advice so far, and to give an intro.


Originally Posted by good4u View Post
Don't worry about the bike shop. I bought two bikes in the last three years at a weight near yours. Ask questions about the different bikes. Maybe look at the manufacturers websites to get some idea of what bikes you'll see. Another thought is to look at used bikes but be very vigilant at getting one that fits.

A thought about the twisting foot would be to get a clip for that pedal and leave the other foot loose.
Thank you. I've been looking at what shops are in my area and what they have to get some idea, as well as some manufacturer websites. There's also a bike co-op about an hour's drive away I may stop in to see what's there. I think using a strap for the one foot may work. Thanks for the suggestion.

Originally Posted by shelbyfv View Post
Rigid mtb with flat pedals. A durable bike with easy gearing. Bike shops get all sorts of customers. If you don't act like a dick they will appreciate your business. Enjoy!
Thanks, also. It's looking like that may be the best option for the places I want to ride. It's been decades since I've visited a bike shop, but I remember them being pretty cool places (except for one which no longer exists, and I was a lot younger and in shape back then). I imagine when I do pick one I'll feel a bit guilty I can't buy a bike from each good shop I visit.
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Old 10-31-19, 08:45 AM
  #6  
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Congratulations on the weight loss so far.


Originally Posted by Sertsa View Post
53, 6'2", 265 lbs ... hoping to be under 250 by year's end and near my goal weight of 190 around next summer.

- I'd like to start riding a bike again, but it's been about 30 years. I've been hiking/walking a lot as well as spending quite a bit of time on an exercise bike.
If you haven't spoken with a nutritionist lately, it might be worthwhile. Possibly, there might be a handful of key changes you could make regarding your intake that would make a world of difference.

As for the exercise, don't discount the utility of strength training, either. For everyone, but particularly for those of us north of 50yrs of age, retaining muscle mass and bone density becomes an increasingly tough challenge. Plus, additional muscle (in place of fat) helps increase your metabolism, burns more calories to maintain, takes up less space (so clothing fits better, even without a weight drop). Also helps guard against injuries, as well, being stronger and more flexible.

If you haven't done so, already, I might suggest having 3-4 days per week in the gym, where you engage in a solid 30-45mins (or more) of strength exercises that challenge the whole body. (In addition to whatever cardio you're doing on that day.)

In time, you could get even more benefit with designating a given day as (for example) "leg" day or "chest" day, focusing mostly on exercises hitting those key areas, with suitable recovery time following the "focused" day before you hit the same muscle area hard again.

As for the cardio: boosting the time you spend and the intensity of the effort can yield good results, in terms of burning more calories.

If you walk on trails, strive to incorporate routes that involve more hills, as well as boosting your speed.

If you walk on a treadmill, consider leveraging the elevation ability a treadmill offers. You can alter the incline, change up your speeds, lengthen/slow your stride, etc, to boost the cardio benefit of the session. Done in an interval sequence, time on a treadmill can be much more challenging than a modest-to-moderate effort.
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Old 10-31-19, 09:41 AM
  #7  
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For the twisted foot, you can get pedal extenders that move the pedal out about 3/4 of an inch. Also try platform pedals with pins and some grippy shoes that may help hold your foot in place. Once you get used to cycling you can move on to clipin (SPD) pedals although they tend to keep your foot straight which maybe uncomfortable for your ankle.

And yeah go to the bike shop they will take your money in shape or not.
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Old 10-31-19, 10:53 AM
  #8  
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Congratulations on such a significant weight loss! That has got to feel great.

For your foot that flares out, clipless pedals can be set-up from the start at whatever cleat position you consider “neutral”. If you want to nudge it back toward being in line you could rotate that cleat before fully tightening the bolts in the direction you want it to go. Then the “float” setting will apply some light or moderate spring tension and allow your heel to rotate inward if need be. Clipless pedals with good cycling shoes will greatly enhance your riding (in my estimation).

Also, if you want to start back to riding on trails, that’s great. As you become more confident, roads are where it’s at. You get much more climbing and descending which correlated to more excitement.

Don’t let a traumatic road experience from 30 years ago jade you. I’ve heard of many riders who crash or have a mishap - they barely miss even one day after that. Everyone crashes at some point, you can’t be protected from everything.

Bike trails are great ways to get out of town but it is the crossroads out in the lesser populated areas where things get interesting.

As for bikes - get what you like! And be prepared to make minor fit adjustments as you continue to drop weight,
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Old 10-31-19, 11:03 AM
  #9  
Sertsa
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Originally Posted by Clyde1820 View Post
Congratulations on the weight loss so far.




If you haven't spoken with a nutritionist lately, it might be worthwhile. Possibly, there might be a handful of key changes you could make regarding your intake that would make a world of difference.

As for the exercise, don't discount the utility of strength training, either. For everyone, but particularly for those of us north of 50yrs of age, retaining muscle mass and bone density becomes an increasingly tough challenge. Plus, additional muscle (in place of fat) helps increase your metabolism, burns more calories to maintain, takes up less space (so clothing fits better, even without a weight drop). Also helps guard against injuries, as well, being stronger and more flexible.

If you haven't done so, already, I might suggest having 3-4 days per week in the gym, where you engage in a solid 30-45mins (or more) of strength exercises that challenge the whole body. (In addition to whatever cardio you're doing on that day.)

In time, you could get even more benefit with designating a given day as (for example) "leg" day or "chest" day, focusing mostly on exercises hitting those key areas, with suitable recovery time following the "focused" day before you hit the same muscle area hard again.

As for the cardio: boosting the time you spend and the intensity of the effort can yield good results, in terms of burning more calories.

If you walk on trails, strive to incorporate routes that involve more hills, as well as boosting your speed.

If you walk on a treadmill, consider leveraging the elevation ability a treadmill offers. You can alter the incline, change up your speeds, lengthen/slow your stride, etc, to boost the cardio benefit of the session. Done in an interval sequence, time on a treadmill can be much more challenging than a modest-to-moderate effort.
Thank you. I had an appointment with a nutritionist yesterday, in fact, to get an idea how to best proceed from here. She said many of the things you do, especially increasing the number of strength training/muscle building exercises. She also said I need to increase protein quite a bit as well as the overall calorie intake. I've also been using more rugged, hilly trails lately, and have increased my speed quite a bit. I've also been going to a gym and use a few weight machines other than the bike, but I have avoided the free weight section so far. I do have a few weights at home. Thanks again.

Originally Posted by wsteve464 View Post
For the twisted foot, you can get pedal extenders that move the pedal out about 3/4 of an inch. Also try platform pedals with pins and some grippy shoes that may help hold your foot in place. Once you get used to cycling you can move on to clipin (SPD) pedals although they tend to keep your foot straight which maybe uncomfortable for your ankle.

And yeah go to the bike shop they will take your money in shape or not.
I didn't know about pedal extenders and will have to look more into the additional options. Thanks.
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Old 10-31-19, 01:46 PM
  #10  
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Originally Posted by masi61 View Post
Congratulations on such a significant weight loss! That has got to feel great.

For your foot that flares out, clipless pedals can be set-up from the start at whatever cleat position you consider “neutral”. If you want to nudge it back toward being in line you could rotate that cleat before fully tightening the bolts in the direction you want it to go. Then the “float” setting will apply some light or moderate spring tension and allow your heel to rotate inward if need be. Clipless pedals with good cycling shoes will greatly enhance your riding (in my estimation).

Also, if you want to start back to riding on trails, that’s great. As you become more confident, roads are where it’s at. You get much more climbing and descending which correlated to more excitement.

Don’t let a traumatic road experience from 30 years ago jade you. I’ve heard of many riders who crash or have a mishap - they barely miss even one day after that. Everyone crashes at some point, you can’t be protected from everything.

Bike trails are great ways to get out of town but it is the crossroads out in the lesser populated areas where things get interesting.

As for bikes - get what you like! And be prepared to make minor fit adjustments as you continue to drop weight,
Thanks, it does feel good. Have a bit to go yet, though. I didn't know clipless pedals had those kind of options; I'll have to try some more. I appreciate the advice about roads, but there's a bit more going on than my experience. A few weeks ago, one of my dad's friends was killed while riding by someone in a pickup (last I heard no one has been charged), and a number of years ago one of my friends died in a similar way. So my family was rather freaked when I mentioned wanting to bike again, so I assured them I'd avoid roads. (I'm also in Ohio, btw, but in the NE portion).
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Old 11-04-19, 05:44 PM
  #11  
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Congrats man, on that weight loss. I know how hard it is. Due to injuries that make walking or hiking difficult beyond just getting around my day, no diet worked. I resorted to weight loss surgery, specifically gastric sleeve. Down a total of 137 pounds from my known heaviest...

Bike shops are easier for a heavier guy to navigate than running stores. Though I used running stores to get the stability shoes I preferred.

I like riding my 29er on gravel and dirt roads, and intend to take it with me on my next trip back home if I get a chance. They have opened a lot of great trails in rural Kansas close to Emporia where the Dirty Kanza is hosted... And I can take a second set of wheels with narrower tires if I choose any road rides.

I ride an old steel 1986 KHS road bike, completely updated with a 2x10 drivetrain. I also have a lighter aluminum bike that was my reward for getting in to the 240s. Both are geared different for different purposes. Any bike you choose will support you fine. 28 spoke wheels are my minimum count presently. 32 and 36 are generally preferred no matter road or MTB bikes. I am very uncomfortable with the clipless pedals. I only use them on my indoor trainer bike. And it is a dedicated bike on the trainer.
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Old 11-04-19, 11:39 PM
  #12  
Sertsa
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Originally Posted by zjrog View Post
Congrats man, on that weight loss. I know how hard it is. Due to injuries that make walking or hiking difficult beyond just getting around my day, no diet worked. I resorted to weight loss surgery, specifically gastric sleeve. Down a total of 137 pounds from my known heaviest...

Bike shops are easier for a heavier guy to navigate than running stores. Though I used running stores to get the stability shoes I preferred.

I like riding my 29er on gravel and dirt roads, and intend to take it with me on my next trip back home if I get a chance. They have opened a lot of great trails in rural Kansas close to Emporia where the Dirty Kanza is hosted... And I can take a second set of wheels with narrower tires if I choose any road rides.

I ride an old steel 1986 KHS road bike, completely updated with a 2x10 drivetrain. I also have a lighter aluminum bike that was my reward for getting in to the 240s. Both are geared different for different purposes. Any bike you choose will support you fine. 28 spoke wheels are my minimum count presently. 32 and 36 are generally preferred no matter road or MTB bikes. I am very uncomfortable with the clipless pedals. I only use them on my indoor trainer bike. And it is a dedicated bike on the trainer.
Thanks. It's been a struggle at times, but I'm thinking I have something decent figure out and hope to continue sticking with it. Congratulations to you as well.

I haven't done much running in a while, just a bit here and there, but I hike as much as I can. Those bikes sound very cool. I stopped at a bike co-op last Saturday, which was nice. They didn't have any bikes that fit me (they said what's available is very low this time of year), but I liked what they're doing and learned quite a bit. So I'm feeling a bit more comfortable. Thanks again.
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Old 11-05-19, 06:10 AM
  #13  
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I enjoy my local bike collective. I've left a bunch of stuff there, as well as bought a lot. If it wasn't 45 minutes away, I'd likely donate time as well.
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Old 11-05-19, 06:11 AM
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Originally Posted by Sertsa View Post
I didn't know about pedal extenders and will have to look more into the additional options. Thanks.
I have a set on my bike, I don't have a specific issue, but find that they help with knee pain in the long run. I got mine from a friend, not sure where you would buy them, but I am sure Google can help with that.
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Old 11-05-19, 08:16 AM
  #15  
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Originally Posted by FLYBYU View Post
I have a set on my bike, I don't have a specific issue, but find that they help with knee pain in the long run. I got mine from a friend, not sure where you would buy them, but I am sure Google can help with that.
I use them on all my bikes. I have an issue with size 13 shoes and heel strikes on the chain stays... I got my last set off Amazon.
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Old 11-05-19, 02:05 PM
  #16  
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Originally Posted by Sertsa View Post
Hi all,

I've been reading this forum quite a bit and have found it both helpful and a little overwhelming with as much as is now available. So I'll try to give a brief synopsis of my situation and plans, should any of you have advice.


- I am 53, 6'2", a man, and currently weigh 265 lbs. I'm working on the weight and have progressed quite a bit. In May, 2018, I weighed 440 lbs. It hurts to admit that, but yeah. I'm hoping to be under 250 by year's end and near my goal weight of 190 around next summer.

- I'd like to start riding a bike again, but it's been about 30 years. I've been hiking/walking a lot as well as spending quite a bit of time on an exercise bike.

- Some of my weight ballooning started after a hiking accident a number of years ago followed by a botched surgery and long hospitalization. There were other contributing factors, but mostly it was my being stupid. A lingering issue, however, is that I twist one foot out a bit when walking and on the exercise bike. Using the pedal strap on the exercise bike helps, but I have to be careful not to hit the bar with my heel.

- I was originally thinking of getting a bike next spring, but I'm being increasingly tempted to get one for at least a few fall rides. Until recently, however, I was too embarrassed to consider stepping foot in a bike shop.

- I do not plan to ride on roads, even though I live in a rural area. I had some close calls 30 years ago with aggressive and distracted drivers, and it seems to have gotten worse (and vehicles larger). Fortunately there are a couple rail trails in the area and a few parks with some nice gravel and dirt bike trails.

- So I'm intrigued and a bit overwhelmed by the available options. From what I've read so far I'm currently thinking about a hybrid, gravel bike, or possibly rigid mountain bike. I'm even more confused with pedal option, especially given the lingering foot issue. And I'm hesitant to walk into a bike shop, as even with the progress so far I'm still an obese, middle-aged man.


So, any advice? Hellos? Diet/weight loss discussion? Thanks!

I hope you realize that your story is NOT unique. Not to downplay it at all, but you are posting in the Clydesdale thread. All of us here have gone thru pretty much what you are experiencing right now at some point. I was not as heavy as you but none the less, I am still considered a clyde.


You have to START somewhere. Keep in mind that if the bike shop is any good at all, they will welcome you with open arms. Us clydes are challenges to them. If it gets another off the couch and onto a bike, great. We need more cyclists.


Now, if you get any kind of flak or if they don't seem interested, pack your bags and move on to another bike shop. There is a bit of snootyness with the cycling community but you have got to just forget about those folks and keep your eyes forward.


As I have said many times to the newbie, don't over spend on a new bike. You do not want a wall hanging that costs 3 grand do you? Well, at least not one that is your never ridden bike! That's equally tough when a friend comes over and asks, "what's that?" Well, I used to ride all the while thinking you blew 3 grand on a piece of wall art.


So, go easy on the budget. Believe me, it is very easy to spend on a new bike. Get something that works for now. Work out the kinks on this bike and then if and when you build endurance, speed and lose some more weight, reward yourself with a better bike. That way there will be no buyers remorse. You will now be in the cycling community. That is how I did it and when I moved up from aluminum to carbon, it made a huge difference, but I waited until I felt I earned it.


It is also OK to feel apprehensive about riding on the road but it is not that bad. Of course I have no idea as to your surroundings but road riding is the way to go if you ask me. Sure, there is a slight chance of getting hit but compare that to a trail where there are many more obstacles that can cause crashing not to mention flat tires. I would say getting hit or killed by a car is very rare compared with crashing over some tree root or getting stuck in the eye with a tree branch. Plus, if you ride with a few others out on the road it is safer than just by yourself. Just my 2 cents, but if you don't feel safe, stay off the road until you feel confident in your abilities. I work with someone that was scared to death of riding on the road. After 2 years, they are riding by themselves all over the place now and just completed a metric century. So, maybe you will never feel comfortable but maybe after a while, you will want to venture out on the open roads and venture down some roads you never would have traveled on if not on a bike.


Keep up the good work and don't let anyone nay say what you are doing.


john
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Old 11-05-19, 03:25 PM
  #17  
Sertsa
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Originally Posted by zjrog View Post
I enjoy my local bike collective. I've left a bunch of stuff there, as well as bought a lot. If it wasn't 45 minutes away, I'd likely donate time as well.
It was very cool, and I hope to make it to one of the maintenance and repair classes over the winter. It's about an hour's drive away for me, but I'm occasionally in the area while doing some other volunteer work.

Originally Posted by FLYBYU View Post
I have a set on my bike, I don't have a specific issue, but find that they help with knee pain in the long run. I got mine from a friend, not sure where you would buy them, but I am sure Google can help with that.
Cool, thanks!

Originally Posted by zjrog View Post
I use them on all my bikes. I have an issue with size 13 shoes and heel strikes on the chain stays... I got my last set off Amazon.
They help with larger shoes as well? Thanks. I have one 13.5" shoe (and one 12.5").

Originally Posted by rutan74 View Post
I hope you realize that your story is NOT unique. Not to downplay it at all, but you are posting in the Clydesdale thread. All of us here have gone thru pretty much what you are experiencing right now at some point. I was not as heavy as you but none the less, I am still considered a clyde.


You have to START somewhere. Keep in mind that if the bike shop is any good at all, they will welcome you with open arms. Us clydes are challenges to them. If it gets another off the couch and onto a bike, great. We need more cyclists.


Now, if you get any kind of flak or if they don't seem interested, pack your bags and move on to another bike shop. There is a bit of snootyness with the cycling community but you have got to just forget about those folks and keep your eyes forward.


As I have said many times to the newbie, don't over spend on a new bike. You do not want a wall hanging that costs 3 grand do you? Well, at least not one that is your never ridden bike! That's equally tough when a friend comes over and asks, "what's that?" Well, I used to ride all the while thinking you blew 3 grand on a piece of wall art.


So, go easy on the budget. Believe me, it is very easy to spend on a new bike. Get something that works for now. Work out the kinks on this bike and then if and when you build endurance, speed and lose some more weight, reward yourself with a better bike. That way there will be no buyers remorse. You will now be in the cycling community. That is how I did it and when I moved up from aluminum to carbon, it made a huge difference, but I waited until I felt I earned it.


It is also OK to feel apprehensive about riding on the road but it is not that bad. Of course I have no idea as to your surroundings but road riding is the way to go if you ask me. Sure, there is a slight chance of getting hit but compare that to a trail where there are many more obstacles that can cause crashing not to mention flat tires. I would say getting hit or killed by a car is very rare compared with crashing over some tree root or getting stuck in the eye with a tree branch. Plus, if you ride with a few others out on the road it is safer than just by yourself. Just my 2 cents, but if you don't feel safe, stay off the road until you feel confident in your abilities. I work with someone that was scared to death of riding on the road. After 2 years, they are riding by themselves all over the place now and just completed a metric century. So, maybe you will never feel comfortable but maybe after a while, you will want to venture out on the open roads and venture down some roads you never would have traveled on if not on a bike.


Keep up the good work and don't let anyone nay say what you are doing.


john
Thanks for the advice and ideas. I'm aware my story is not unique, and I was glad to see this section of the forum, which is why I first posted here. I have noticed the occasional snootiness so far, but it's mostly been positive and welcoming. I can say that for a number of interest-communities. As for budget, I wasn't thinking of anything near 3 grand. As for the road riding, mostly my family is worried, so I promised I'd avoid roads. To sum up, the two most avid road cyclists we've known were both killed while riding, the second one a few weeks ago. I may consider it sometime later, but for now there are a few nice trails in the area, including an asphalt rail trail. Thanks again.
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Old 11-06-19, 03:12 PM
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Originally Posted by Sertsa View Post
It was very cool, and I hope to make it to one of the maintenance and repair classes over the winter. It's about an hour's drive away for me, but I'm occasionally in the area while doing some other volunteer work.



Cool, thanks!



They help with larger shoes as well? Thanks. I have one 13.5" shoe (and one 12.5").



Thanks for the advice and ideas. I'm aware my story is not unique, and I was glad to see this section of the forum, which is why I first posted here. I have noticed the occasional snootiness so far, but it's mostly been positive and welcoming. I can say that for a number of interest-communities. As for budget, I wasn't thinking of anything near 3 grand. As for the road riding, mostly my family is worried, so I promised I'd avoid roads. To sum up, the two most avid road cyclists we've known were both killed while riding, the second one a few weeks ago. I may consider it sometime later, but for now there are a few nice trails in the area, including an asphalt rail trail. Thanks again.
That's tough. I guess it just all depends. I don't know anyone that has been killed. I have heard of people here and there but I have not known anyone personally that was killed while riding. To have known 2 is out there to me. That would freak me out too. I just feel that there is not much I can do on the road to protect myself that I am not already doing. That is except for the fact that I could choose not to ride on the road but to me, I don't even consider it. I guess it all depends on where you ride too. Not saying that you could not get hit on the safest road in America but I don't ride in congested areas. A man has got to know his limitations.

3 grand for a bike is not that much, really. It "sounds" like a lot but it really is not. My first bike was on special at around 900 but I am sure you can even do better than that. There are probably leftovers from last year and you should be able to get a deal on a 2019 model instead of the new 2020's. Good luck and pedal on.

john
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Old 11-07-19, 01:08 AM
  #19  
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Originally Posted by rutan74 View Post
That's tough. I guess it just all depends. I don't know anyone that has been killed. I have heard of people here and there but I have not known anyone personally that was killed while riding. To have known 2 is out there to me. That would freak me out too. I just feel that there is not much I can do on the road to protect myself that I am not already doing. That is except for the fact that I could choose not to ride on the road but to me, I don't even consider it. I guess it all depends on where you ride too. Not saying that you could not get hit on the safest road in America but I don't ride in congested areas. A man has got to know his limitations.

3 grand for a bike is not that much, really. It "sounds" like a lot but it really is not. My first bike was on special at around 900 but I am sure you can even do better than that. There are probably leftovers from last year and you should be able to get a deal on a 2019 model instead of the new 2020's. Good luck and pedal on.

john
Thanks. It still feels out there to know two people killed while riding. One was at an intersection in a fairly large suburb where the driver ran a red light. The most recent was on a rural highway and was a hit and run.

Anyway, as for bike cost, I'm becoming aware that it's easy to spend 3 grand and much more. I'm thinking I can find something reasonable in the $1K range, but I'm fairly flexible on price. I also plan to stop at a local co-op once they have more bikes available.
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Old 11-07-19, 02:42 PM
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Originally Posted by Sertsa View Post
Thanks. It still feels out there to know two people killed while riding. One was at an intersection in a fairly large suburb where the driver ran a red light. The most recent was on a rural highway and was a hit and run.

Anyway, as for bike cost, I'm becoming aware that it's easy to spend 3 grand and much more. I'm thinking I can find something reasonable in the $1K range, but I'm fairly flexible on price. I also plan to stop at a local co-op once they have more bikes available.
That's tough. Look on the bright side a bit. In your first description, it was not the riders fault as the other person ran a red light. What could they have done differently? If they had been in a car, the other person would still have run the light possibly and caused a crash. Maybe not fatal, but cash none the less.

The second person was due to a hit and run. That is incredibly sad. Again, probably nothing they could have done to prevent it since it was from behind I guess. This is where a ride cam could have maybe helped to identify the perp. I am thinking seriously about getting a ride cam to record my rides just for stuff like this. That is, if I were to survive.

Little consolation here is the fact that whoever did the hit and run has to live with that guilt the rest of their lives. Not a fair trade in anyway but hopefully the guilt eats them alive. Maybe someday, when they can't take it any longer, they will come clean.

As for you bike and money, spend wisely. Like I said, I went for under a grand and got into a Specialized. Rode it a lot and then rewarded myself with a new bike that went on sale after Christmas a few years ago. Didn't plan on it but was just visiting a bike shop I had not been in and they were moving the shop to a new location. The bikes were 30% off as they were just trying to sell what they had so they would not have to move them to the new place. So, my 3k bike actually cost 2k. I got a heck of a deal. Full carbon with an ultegra group set. So, shop around. There are plenty of decent bikes around for 800-1000. My other advice is ride as many models as you can. There are differences. Try not to get hung up on a brand name. Focus on the bike that feels right to you. Oh yea, no race geometry. Go with the endurance geometry. It is a little more upright and a lot more comfortable. Leave the race geometry to those young guns that still have a lot of flexibility.

john
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Old 11-08-19, 08:38 AM
  #21  
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Originally Posted by rutan74 View Post
That's tough. Look on the bright side a bit. In your first description, it was not the riders fault as the other person ran a red light. What could they have done differently? If they had been in a car, the other person would still have run the light possibly and caused a crash. Maybe not fatal, but cash none the less.

The second person was due to a hit and run. That is incredibly sad. Again, probably nothing they could have done to prevent it since it was from behind I guess. This is where a ride cam could have maybe helped to identify the perp. I am thinking seriously about getting a ride cam to record my rides just for stuff like this. That is, if I were to survive.

Little consolation here is the fact that whoever did the hit and run has to live with that guilt the rest of their lives. Not a fair trade in anyway but hopefully the guilt eats them alive. Maybe someday, when they can't take it any longer, they will come clean.

As for you bike and money, spend wisely. Like I said, I went for under a grand and got into a Specialized. Rode it a lot and then rewarded myself with a new bike that went on sale after Christmas a few years ago. Didn't plan on it but was just visiting a bike shop I had not been in and they were moving the shop to a new location. The bikes were 30% off as they were just trying to sell what they had so they would not have to move them to the new place. So, my 3k bike actually cost 2k. I got a heck of a deal. Full carbon with an ultegra group set. So, shop around. There are plenty of decent bikes around for 800-1000. My other advice is ride as many models as you can. There are differences. Try not to get hung up on a brand name. Focus on the bike that feels right to you. Oh yea, no race geometry. Go with the endurance geometry. It is a little more upright and a lot more comfortable. Leave the race geometry to those young guns that still have a lot of flexibility.

john
Thanks. Regarding the hit and run, the last I heard is that the police were able to identify the pickup using a security camera in the area.

Both of those bikes sound fantastic. I have been looking at different options and plan to go with at least a reasonably comfortable riding position. I didn't ride any at the co-op but even simply sitting on a couple was informative. I was surprised how much I liked an older, rigid mountain bike, even though it was a little too small for me.
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Old 01-24-20, 11:47 AM
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Originally Posted by Sertsa View Post
Thank you. I had an appointment with a nutritionist yesterday, in fact, to get an idea how to best proceed from here. She said many of the things you do, especially increasing the number of strength training/muscle building exercises. She also said I need to increase protein quite a bit ...
@Sertsa: It's been a few months ... Just wondering whether you've made a number of changes (with nutrition) and whether they've ended up being clear improvements.
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Old 01-24-20, 07:53 PM
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Originally Posted by Clyde1820 View Post
@Sertsa: It's been a few months ... Just wondering whether you've made a number of changes (with nutrition) and whether they've ended up being clear improvements.
Hi. Thanks for remembering and checking. I have added strength training, increased protein, and overall calories from where I'd been throughout most of last year. There are some improvements, although not nearly as dramatic as they were earlier in the year. I've had some frustration of late, as I'd gotten used to how quickly I was dropping weight, but progress has slowed. Still, it's interesting to revisit this thread and see the weight difference, as I'm now at 248. And I've built a fair bit of muscle over the last few months. I really started noticing the difference a month or so ago.
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Old 01-24-20, 08:48 PM
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Originally Posted by Sertsa View Post
Hi. Thanks for remembering and checking. I have added strength training, increased protein, and overall calories from where I'd been throughout most of last year. There are some improvements, although not nearly as dramatic as they were earlier in the year. I've had some frustration of late, as I'd gotten used to how quickly I was dropping weight, but progress has slowed. Still, it's interesting to revisit this thread and see the weight difference, as I'm now at 248. And I've built a fair bit of muscle over the last few months. I really started noticing the difference a month or so ago.
Well, keep in mind that, as you build muscle, an increasing portion of your calorie consumption goes toward building and maintaining that muscle. You're still burning lots of calories ... more, actually, given working harder to get stronger. But it can seemingly slow the progress. At least from the standpoint of the weight displayed on the scale. But look at your size and shape, as well. Muscle takes up less space than fat. And it takes more energy to maintain once it has been built up, long after you've finished your workout. If you can find the balance between increased protein and nutrient consumption and the amount of extra effort you're giving, you might (in the longer run) find your overall results are better.

Takes time to change the body's "preference" for the harder work, for the more-solid muscle-building activities. But it can pay huge dividends.

Might try to find certain exercises that stress a good amount of stamina over outright strength. Say, a variety of "floor" exercises ... mountain climbers, burpees, jumping jacks, pushups, situps and the like. Or, circuits of strength exercises with very little delays between them.

You can also do certain activities differently, to ramp up the intensity of the overall session. Such as, instead of a brisk walk through the neighborhood, head into the hills for a tougher walk involving intervals of increased-pace and "deeper" stride instead of your normal and customary stride. Can be more strength oriented, and can be much more challenging cardio-wise. Can do much the same thing on a treadmill, via elevation changes with one of the "hill" programs. Keep the intensity higher during the "tough" stages, gradually allow fewer and fewer "rest" (lower-intensity) portions of your session, and leverage the elevation changes to get your pulse rate into a higher range. Can also carry some weights while you walk, such as a set of ~10-15lb kettle bells or dumbbells. (And, with weights like this, it's simple to do a variety of upper-body exercises while you're walking.)

Here are some ideas for a variety of floor exercises you might try: Darebee.com.

On a rowing machine, there are a lot of higher-intensity circuits you can do. Can result in huge calorie burn, increase in your cardio fitness, and it enlists a variety of muscles to get the job done (something like floor exercises do): Training Plan @ Concept2.com.

And, of course, with the bike, you can vary the intensity and include intervals into sessions to burn far more calories overall.
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Old 01-25-20, 08:31 AM
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I am far from able to give you much advice as I too am a returning rider after many years away.

In 2009 my old man had a heart attack (he survived). But at the time it scared me. Dad was near 400lbs then and I was not far off at 350. So I went out and bought two bikes. I felt really embarrassed walking into that bike shop at 350lbs. But I was treated very well and was made to feel comfy very quickly.

I bought that day a starter mountain bike for myself that just fit me better than most other bikes. It was comfy and far better than all the big box store bikes of my child hood. I also bought a comfort bike for my father to join me on. Sadly cycling wasent for my dad but I stuck with it and got down to 250lbs within a few years UNTILL. In September 2012 I got hit by a car while out on my motorcycle one night. Physically it messed me up pretty good and it was a full year before I could even attempt walking again.

Today I am have one leg 1” shorter than the other my left foot is splayed out a bit and the ankle joint can’t twist much only moves forward and back. I have arthritis in my left knee and have very little muscle in the leg. I also have some issues with my hip lower back and my left shoulder.

But that all being said. After a few Failed attempts to return to riding bicycles. This year I’m more dedicated than ever (motivated by kids of my own now). And although I won’t lie it HURTs it also feels so good to be cycling again the half dozen times our winter weather broke allowing me to.


Today I stand at 264lbs am slightly shorter than I once was at 5’10.5” and am 36 years old. I still ride motorcycles and love it. I still will cycle on the road (though I enjoy trails and bike paths more). And despite a few limitations try to enjoy the things I did before my accident.

My point is get yourself a bike. You can do this and you may just realize it’s FUN. Get yourself a bike that YOU feel comfy on and like. Getting out for FUN is far easier than going out to prove anything to anyone. You don’t need a 3k bike. Both my bikes and the bike I bought my dad combined don’t cost 3k. But maintained they all still work and ride fine today.

The one bike I have is a hybrid similar to what you looking at I believe. It’s a great bike and one I have some big rides planes for on. but to be honest I don’t think i would have liked it when I first started. It’s a very ruff ride and with skinny tires I was worried about my weight on it. If your set on trails and bike paths only. Don’t be afraid to try a hard tail mountain bike. They not as fast and don’t roll as easy. So your liable to not go as far or fast. but if it gets you out there and turning the cranks then it’s the best bike in the world to ride.

enjoy the journey.

Last edited by TinyBear; 01-25-20 at 08:44 AM.
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