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Dagnabit

Old 01-16-20, 11:23 PM
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MarcusT
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Dagnabit

I have worked on my own bike since I was a child, fixing flats, greasing bearings, etc, then moved up to building up from frame. Now, during the winter months, after I do the yearly maintenance on my bikes, I offer to friends. With all the new tech coming out though, I feel so far behind the curve, I am hesitant when someone brings me their new bike.
Kind of familiar with hyd disc breaks.
Modern sealed hubs are still a strange animal to me.
Finally realized what a clutch is on a rear derailleur.
It can be overwhelming not only for the knowledge but for tools as well. Just with bottom bracket tools, there are more choices than I can remember.
So, when a friend brought his wife's 90's city bike that had been sitting in the car port for 20 yrs. Rusty, encrusted with dirt and crud, I was more than happy to take the challenge. It felt good to see components I knew well and had all the tools for. Ball bearings (hubs, BB, headset) with a little care, turned so smooth and what seemed forever. Even the seized seat post was a simple task.
How do you feel with bike tech taking such a vast road? Do you find it encouraging or frustrating when you have to adapt to a different system (tools, carbon, etc)?
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Old 01-17-20, 11:11 AM
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My bikes are older, and other than minor adjustments, I don't do a lot of work on other's bikes. But reading the mechanics section on here, it does seem that it continues to get more and more complex, and not made easier by the many options available on components. I like learning new things, but not ready to duplicate all of the specialized bike tools that I have accumulated. Just glad that there is a section here on mechanics, so I can request help if (when?) I run into something I'm not familiar with.
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Old 01-18-20, 10:05 AM
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I feel the same way. Like you, I have worked on bikes since I was a kid back in the early 70s. Today, I have several older bikes that I continue to ride, and I do all the work on them myself. Pressed-in BB bearings, cut steerer tubes, disc brakes, and now wireless shifting. I'm not usually afraid to work on anything...if I have the right tools. But all this new stuff requires specialized tools. And really...do all these changes make the bike that much better? Maybe...if you're racing. But for just getting out there to get in your miles, and/or for the weekend old man group ride...give me my old bikes. I have a modern CF bike that my wife gave me a few years ago with lots of components that required the newer methods. I almost never ride it because I can't do the work on it, and I don't want to take it to the LBS. Someone asked me why I like riding older bikes rather than more modern bikes. My response was "Some car enthusiasts like driving a new Lamborghini. Some like driving a nice, restored GTO SuperSport."


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Old 01-18-20, 12:35 PM
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YouTube has been a tremendous help to me, especially with bike stuff. I had zero knowledge of hydraulic disc brakes. However, between reading online instructions and watching YouTube instructional videos I was able to build up a new bike with hydraulic disc brakes. I still made mistakes, like letting air get into the lines, but now Iím very comfortable working on them.

Since I was doing the work solo no one was around to snicker at my rookie mistakes!!!
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Old 01-18-20, 01:07 PM
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Back in the day when I first started wrenching, there was a learning curve. While learning, I made some mistakes. Rarely was it ever anything that ultimately didnít get resolved one way or another.

Fast forward to 2020 - Iíve got my old school knowledge which comes in handy in empowering me to try some of the newer mechanic skills for modern, lightweight bicycles. Use of tubeless tires, chain waxing, Torx fasteners for carbon fiber seatposts, handlebars, stems...
Also going from 5 to 6 to 7 to 8 to 9 to 10 to 11 speed freewheels/cassettes has been more of a lifelong evolution!
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Old 01-20-20, 10:44 AM
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Been working in a bike shop as a wrench or manager since 1982 and have adapted to the latest and greatest stuff as it came along. Currently the new stuff is hydro brakes and electronic shifting along with ebikes. It takes time to figure it out, but it is no different than working on a car. It can be done. Have a full shop in my basement and fix the neighbors bikes for them as well, but I do draw the line at anything hydro and electronic simply because I want to get paid for that skill level so I refer them to the shop!
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Old 01-20-20, 11:23 PM
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i have many road bikes but only 2 categories: friction shifters and Campi 10speed. keeps things somewhat simpler.
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Old 01-21-20, 09:13 AM
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I think so too. I used to post a lot more on Bike Forums but I'm finding myself a little off the pace with much of the newer stuff. Last year I gave away my work stand and a lot of my tools. I saved the stuff I think that I might need to work on our own stuff and I have a trike specific work stand on order.

My only regret is that my sons used to bring their bikes over to my place to work on. Now they are both now pretty well equipped to so everything in their own home shops.
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Old 01-24-20, 03:31 PM
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I feel somewhat the same about autos. At one time I was relatively good at diagnosing electrical systems. Now, with electronic ignitions controlled by computers, I know nothing. Worst than that, many others in the auto business, including engineers, know only a bit more. We all remember several years ago when Toyotas? were having serious and sudden and dangerous accelerations, some of which led to serious incidents. The experts immediately blamed victims. In my own vehicle, the keyless entry gets out of sunc and will only open when it has a mind to.
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Old 01-24-20, 03:54 PM
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I deal with the technology creep with my two C&V rides, 80 Medici Pro Strada, and an 84 Tommasini Prestige. Both are friction shifting, 5x2 10-speeds, all Campagnolo NR/SR as originally built. Use tubulars for the tires on both, old school is in my blood completely. Even my non-vintage ride is becoming a throw back with its manual brifter shifting, caliper rim brakes, skinny 25mm tire width, and the no gravel accouterments at all. Roadie to the core, steel and friction shifting on tubs are how I roll.

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Old 01-24-20, 03:54 PM
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[QUOTE=berner;21298422. Now, with electronic ignitions controlled by computers, I know nothing. Worst than that, many others in the auto business, including engineers, know only a bit more. We all remember several years ago when Toyotas? were having serious and sudden and dangerous accelerations, some of which led to serious incidents. The experts immediately blamed victims. In my own vehicle, the keyless entry gets out of sunc and will only open when it has a mind to.[/QUOTE]
I believe the unwanted accelerations in electronic throttle cars is a farce. If you'll recall, the US government got NASA engineers involved and spent $15million of taxpayer money to investigate those Toyotas and they came up with nothing. Suddenly, the complaints stopped.
I worked as a diagnosis specialist for the last 30 odd years at GM dealers and we would get a few of those complaints, too. I don't want to say it's impossible but I have never seen any evidence that it happened nor have I ever heard of a technician being able to induce it (unwanted acceleration).
Electronic controls and computers on cars goes back to the late 70s.
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Old 01-24-20, 04:08 PM
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We've all heard of or even own electronic shifting but now there is wireless shifting and even wireless dropper seatposts for mountain bikes.
Shimano had a programmable derailleur system for mountain bikes where you could control both front and rear derailleurs with a single switch and you could program it to change the front when it hit a certain cog in the rear. Unfortunately for Shimano, one by systems took over and nobody wants front derailleurs on their mountain bikes anymore.
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Old 01-24-20, 05:45 PM
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Originally Posted by big john View Post
W. Unfortunately for Shimano, one by systems took over and nobody wants front derailleurs on their mountain bikes anymore.
Not a bad thing for Shimano. When I purchased my 8050 road group (partial) 2 years ago, I think it was just under $900. When I (just for giggles) priced a 1X XT upgrade it was near $800, for a single shifter and single derailer and required part. I think Iíll skip that.
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Old 01-24-20, 05:53 PM
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Originally Posted by Retro Grouch View Post
... My only regret is that my sons used to bring their bikes over to my place to work on. Now they are both now pretty well equipped to so everything in their own home shops.
You raised your boys right, as I did. We do visit each other's houses to collaborate and help on car, bike, appliance, and home repair projects. Fortunately both live within a 5-mile radius of my house, and the elder one appreciates getting babysitting service from grandma and grandpa.
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Old 01-24-20, 07:14 PM
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Originally Posted by Steve B. View Post
Not a bad thing for Shimano. When I purchased my 8050 road group (partial) 2 years ago, I think it was just under $900. When I (just for giggles) priced a 1X XT upgrade it was near $800, for a single shifter and single derailer and required part. I think I’ll skip that.
What I meant was Shimano spent time and money developing an electronic shifting system which was rendered obsolete by the time it hit market, despite what they may charge for XT stuff, or even XTR.

btw, I have 11 speed XT one-by on my mtb and it shifts great.

https://www.pinkbike.com/news/review...rivetrain.html

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