Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Cyclocross and Gravelbiking (Recreational)
Reload this Page >

Looking For A More Compliant Fork.

Notices
Cyclocross and Gravelbiking (Recreational) This has to be the most physically intense sport ever invented. It's high speed bicycle racing on a short off road course or riding the off pavement rides on gravel like :The Dirty Kanza". We also have a dedicated Racing forum for the Cyclocross Hard Core Racers.

Looking For A More Compliant Fork.

Old 12-07-19, 02:10 PM
  #1  
Krenovian
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Krenovian's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: Park City, UT
Posts: 88

Bikes: Hers: Volagi Liscio, Kestrel 200 SCI, Niner Jet9 RDO, Ellsworth Truth. His: Kestrel 200 EMS, Niner Jet9, Psyclewerks Wild Hare. Ours: Paketa V2

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Looking For A More Compliant Fork.

I'm riding a 2019 Niner RLT RDO. I find that the rear of the bike and front of the bike are out of balance. By that I mean the back of the bike feels much more compliant than the front. I guess that is to be expected when the fork has no rider wt. limit and I weigh 155 lbs. I've replaced the stem with a Redshift Shock Stop stem and that has helped. I'm wondering if there is a more compliant fork out there? I'm also looking for a fork with more rake/offset. I have some minor toe overlap with a 38 mm tire on the front which will be more marked with a bigger tire. Forks under consideration include ENVE's G series gravel fork, Parlee's gravel fork and the 3T Luteus II Team Stealth fork. Do any of you have experience with these forks in comparison to the Niner fork? Any other forks you might recommend for my consideration?

Last edited by Krenovian; 12-07-19 at 04:26 PM.
Krenovian is offline  
Old 12-07-19, 02:24 PM
  #2  
Spoonrobot 
Senior Member
 
Spoonrobot's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 3,269
Mentioned: 63 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1167 Post(s)
Liked 112 Times in 79 Posts
#1 thing you could do is run a fork with 1 1/8Ē straight steerer with a headset reducer. The lack of compliance is almost entirely from the OS headtube and steerer.
Spoonrobot is offline  
Old 12-07-19, 04:25 PM
  #3  
Krenovian
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Krenovian's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: Park City, UT
Posts: 88

Bikes: Hers: Volagi Liscio, Kestrel 200 SCI, Niner Jet9 RDO, Ellsworth Truth. His: Kestrel 200 EMS, Niner Jet9, Psyclewerks Wild Hare. Ours: Paketa V2

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Spoonrobot View Post
#1 thing you could do is run a fork with 1 1/8Ē straight steerer with a headset reducer. The lack of compliance is almost entirely from the OS headtube and steerer.
I hadn't thought about it from that standpoint. It makes sense.
Krenovian is offline  
Old 12-07-19, 05:08 PM
  #4  
mstateglfr 
Sunshine
 
mstateglfr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: Des Moines, IA
Posts: 10,430

Bikes: '18 class built steel roadbike, '19 Fairlight Secan, '87 Schwinn Prelude, Black Mountain Cycles Monstercross V4, '89 Novara Trionfo, '18 Diamondback Syncr

Mentioned: 94 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4072 Post(s)
Liked 1,041 Times in 665 Posts
Originally Posted by Krenovian View Post
I hadn't thought about it from that standpoint. It makes sense.
What spoon said.
your bike with a different steerer width or perhaps better yet- a frame that doesnt have a massively oversized head tube and tapered steerer combo would change the stiffness/harshness.

https://whiskyparts.co/forks/no.9-cx-disc-12-straight

This has a 1 1/8 steerer, is full carbon, and clears 42mm tires. Not sure how the rake and axle to crown measurements compare to your current setup.
mstateglfr is offline  
Old 12-07-19, 06:37 PM
  #5  
shoota 
Senior Member
 
shoota's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: not sure
Posts: 6,926
Mentioned: 20 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1283 Post(s)
Liked 157 Times in 121 Posts
Oversized head tubes are a plague on modern gravel bikes. There's no reason for them. Change my mind.
__________________
2014 Cannondale SuperSix EVO 2
2015 Cannondale SuperX Hi-Mod
2019 Salsa Warbird

Last edited by shoota; 12-07-19 at 06:54 PM.
shoota is offline  
Old 12-07-19, 06:41 PM
  #6  
ThermionicScott 
7-speed cultist
 
ThermionicScott's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: CID
Posts: 20,010

Bikes: 1991 Bianchi Eros, 1964 Armstrong, 1988 Diamondback Ascent, 1988 Bianchi Premio, 1987 Bianchi Sport SX, 1980s Raleigh mixte (hers)

Mentioned: 87 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2769 Post(s)
Liked 680 Times in 474 Posts
Isn't there some thinking that having a steerer that is more flexible than the fork blades contributes to brake shudder, though?
__________________
Originally Posted by chandltp View Post
There's no such thing as too far.. just lack of time
Originally Posted by noglider
People in this forum are not typical.
RUSA #7498
ThermionicScott is offline  
Old 12-07-19, 07:19 PM
  #7  
Elvo
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Orange County, CA
Posts: 4,378
Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 447 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 119 Times in 70 Posts
Fox Ax, Lauf Grit
Elvo is online now  
Old 12-07-19, 07:58 PM
  #8  
Spoonrobot 
Senior Member
 
Spoonrobot's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 3,269
Mentioned: 63 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1167 Post(s)
Liked 112 Times in 79 Posts
Originally Posted by ThermionicScott View Post
Isn't there some thinking that having a steerer that is more flexible than the fork blades contributes to brake shudder, though?
Thatís edge case for disc brakes limited to very heavy riders and very light steerers - probably lighter than one could get in a production fork. Itís much more common for average riders on cantis. Disc system harmonics are so different that stutter is almost always uneven pad deposit, off center caliper or issue with the hydraulic system.
Spoonrobot is offline  
Likes For Spoonrobot:
Old 12-07-19, 07:59 PM
  #9  
dsaul
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: South Jersey
Posts: 1,561
Mentioned: 11 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 454 Post(s)
Liked 203 Times in 153 Posts
Carbon forks and compliance don't go together. Let some air out of your front tire.
dsaul is offline  
Old 12-08-19, 04:10 AM
  #10  
sweetspot
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Posts: 166
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 81 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 8 Times in 8 Posts
this is a very interesting topic for me. I feel that today's gravel bikes are not balanced in terms of front and rear comfort. It is much easier to engineer compliance at the rear. Front of the bike is much harder but you still have at least 3 things to do. First, like it was already said, it is the headtube and the width of the steerer. Your bike, like many of current gravel bikes, has an oversized headtube so even if the steerer itself is narrow, the headset will keep it from flexing too much. The second thing is the fork length. Generally the longer the fork the more flexing it can exhibit. But too much flex is no good, especially if you have disc brakes (like every gravel bike has now) so don't expect much but for sure longer forks can be more comfortable. And finally, there is something that I discovered recently while testing a GT Grade Carbon bike with its Flip Chip fork. I mean if you move the axle of the fork axis and closer to the rider it will promote more flex and generally more comfortable ride (this is the same patent that my Jamis Renegade bike uses with its ECO compliance fork). Yet again, we are talking about a few percent more compliance. So in the end, if you want a really comfortable front end of the bike, go for something like Specialized Diverge with its Future Shock. From my experience, you will have a hard time finding something more comfortable...

Last edited by sweetspot; 12-08-19 at 04:20 AM.
sweetspot is offline  
Old 12-14-19, 12:00 AM
  #11  
dwmckee
Senior Member
 
dwmckee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Pittsburgh, PA
Posts: 1,898

Bikes: Co-Motion Cappuccino Tandem,'88 Bob Jackson Touring, Co-Motion Cascadia Touring, Open U.P., Ritchie Titanium Breakaway, Frances Cycles SmallHaul cargo bike. Those are the permanent ones; others wander in and out of the stable occasionally as well.

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 199 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 80 Times in 51 Posts
I suspect your more sensitive hands at the handlebars vs. your comparitively less sensitive and well padded arse at the rear is why you feel the front is less compliant. Actually a curved, raked and cantilevered front fork at the front end is likely more compliant than the dual triangulated rear on most biikes though if you could measure it. Also the fact that you instinctively take weight off of the seat by standing a bit when you see bumps also makes the rear seem more compliant. You cannot easily de-weight your front end like you can your rear end.

I have been riding a Lauf Grit fork for about two months now for gravel riding and I have to say it is freakin' amazing. Not only is it a great way to gain compliance with no loss of precision steering, but it has INSTANTLY cured my chronic hand numbness problem! I highly recommend it as a great comfort enhancer with very modest weight penalty. No moving parts either!
dwmckee is offline  

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information

Copyright © 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.