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Correct placement for this kind of time trial bars?

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Correct placement for this kind of time trial bars?

Old 06-07-20, 10:18 PM
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Correct BRAKE placement for this kind of time trial bars?

I forgot to type "correct BRAKE placement" in the title

Originally the brakes were at position 1, but I didn't want to bend over too low and have to bend my neck up a lot to see, and I also wanted to be able to place my hands on the brakes, so I moved them to position 2,

But when I moved the brakes to position 2 or anything higher than that, it seems really off, the way the handle bar is constructed, if I lean into the front portion of bars with my bodyweight, it seemed as though either the stem or the bars were going to give out. The torque is working against the design of this bar.

I tried to look up how these bars were used in the past so I could better figure out the ideal brake location, but couldn't find anything so far.

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Old 06-08-20, 02:59 AM
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Check Google images and the Centurion Ironman thread on the C&V forum for examples of how other folks have set up those old school one piece drop/aero bars.

I haven't used that type myself and the brake placement always looks like a compromise. But I suppose those bars were intended for time trials where brakes are seldom used anyway.
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Old 06-08-20, 05:06 AM
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Here you go.

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Old 06-08-20, 07:20 AM
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Interesting thread about where to place brake levers on a bar that is meant to only go fast

As long as the levers are placed so that the levers' have enough arc/travel to safely work the calipers, the levers don't bottom out on the bars and the levers are easily reached with minimal rider contortions, what does it mater? Andy
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Old 06-08-20, 08:13 AM
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You might be happier with bar end brake levers such as this...




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Old 06-08-20, 11:21 AM
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Originally Posted by texaspandj View Post
Here you go.
Spoiler
 
That's where I current placed the brakes too after some trial and error, but when I applied brakes, the brake lever would hit the handlebar,
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Old 06-08-20, 03:28 PM
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Originally Posted by CaptainPlanet View Post
That's where I current placed the brakes too after some trial and error, but when I applied brakes, the brake lever would hit the handlebar,
The brakeset I'm using is the original '87 105 and really the best action I've ever gotten out of any brakeset. Anyhoo, position the bottom of the brake levers even with the bottom of the bars (per usual) and you shouldn't have that problem unless you have a different style lever or you're brakes need a slight adjustment.
As far as the bars themselves, they are the original first generation aerobars and my personal favorite. I like them mostly because they're less obtrusive than add on attachments. An added bonus is you have the regular hand positions as regular road bars,drops, hooks, hoods, etc.. plus a few more.
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Old 06-08-20, 03:49 PM
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Originally Posted by texaspandj View Post
The brakeset I'm using is the original '87 105 and really the best action I've ever gotten out of any brakeset. Anyhoo, position the bottom of the brake levers even with the bottom of the bars (per usual) and you shouldn't have that problem unless you have a different style lever or you're brakes need a slight adjustment.
As far as the bars themselves, they are the original first generation aerobars and my personal favorite. I like them mostly because they're less obtrusive than add on attachments. An added bonus is you have the regular hand positions as regular road bars,drops, hooks, hoods, etc.. plus a few more.
I have this problem that when I put my hands at the front portion of the bars, it feels like I am applying torque against the handlebar and stem, and the bars keeps bouncing against me. Do you feel the same thing as well?
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Old 06-08-20, 08:26 PM
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Originally Posted by CaptainPlanet View Post
I have this problem that when I put my hands at the front portion of the bars, it feels like I am applying torque against the handlebar and stem, and the bars keeps bouncing against me. Do you feel the same thing as well?
Perhaps I'm not as strong as you because it moves but not enough for me to worry about it. However, others had the same feeling bitd and the Scott company remidied it with a bridge for the end of the bars.
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Old 06-08-20, 08:27 PM
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These long lengths of not very stiff tubes (meaning this generation of Aero bars) will have a lot of flex from design. Whether this was the goal or just a byproduct of other "more important" factors. It was Greg L that commented on Boone Lennon's clip one bars at that climatic TdF last stage time trial when the clip on bars slipped with Greg's force. Boone asked how often Greg applied that amount of force, that allowed the bars to rotate and slip on the standard roar drop bars. Greg's reply was along the lines of "every pedal stroke".

My point is that these bars are not designed to be stiff or ergonomic WRT the bike handling or brake levers. They are first and only about being in a aero position. To start to seek other priorities will lead you down the path of so many others who have given up on these one piece design and adopted drop bars with clip ones if they must also have a fore arm pad and/or aero position. Andy
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Old 06-08-20, 08:29 PM
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Originally Posted by texaspandj View Post
Perhaps I'm not as strong as you because it moves but not enough for me to worry about it. However, others had the same feeling bitd and the Scott company remidied it with a bridge for the end of the bars.

The bridge was made of plastic with two necked down sections. The bridge added only minor stiffness, when installed well... But it did add a thumb hook that felt good for many and an optional frame shift lever location. Andy
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Old 06-09-20, 09:06 PM
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It was a loose headset and after tightening it, the steering assembly flexes a lot less now.
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Old 06-09-20, 09:19 PM
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Of course it would. Andy
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Old 06-10-20, 08:51 AM
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Originally Posted by Andrew R Stewart View Post
These long lengths of not very stiff tubes (meaning this generation of Aero bars) will have a lot of flex from design. Whether this was the goal or just a byproduct of other "more important" factors. It was Greg L that commented on Boone Lennon's clip one bars at that climatic TdF last stage time trial when the clip on bars slipped with Greg's force. Boone asked how often Greg applied that amount of force, that allowed the bars to rotate and slip on the standard roar drop bars. Greg's reply was along the lines of "every pedal stroke".

My point is that these bars are not designed to be stiff or ergonomic WRT the bike handling or brake levers. They are first and only about being in a aero position. To start to seek other priorities will lead you down the path of so many others who have given up on these one piece design and adopted drop bars with clip ones if they must also have a fore arm pad and/or aero position. Andy
I fairly confident this is the answer.
It's a compromise.
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