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Personal bike shop

Old 06-29-20, 11:55 AM
  #1  
Bikeboystephen
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Personal bike shop

I looked at the "new posters look here" and I tried to search for this to no avail. I'm looking into trying to assemble my own bike shop in my garage or in my shed in my backyard, and I'm on the mechanics page because I would like to know what tools, stands and otherwise bike-related pieces others suggest I have. I'm not looking for an introductory toolset or things to keep in case of emergency, I'm looking for a full scale list of recommended assets to keep in my personal shop. What tools come in the most handy for others, what would they suggest I use to make repairs and restorations easier. Thanks in advance!
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Old 06-29-20, 11:57 AM
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Don't forget the really important stuff like shop posters, a small fridge, and a music system.
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Old 06-29-20, 12:08 PM
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You want to buy a bunch of tools you don't know how to use? A Campy tool set is always a good place to start
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Old 06-29-20, 12:31 PM
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All you need is a bike and a place to put it that has enough room so you can move around it. Good bright lighting helps too. You might want a work stand, but I've gone well over 50 years without one. And at one time I was keeping my bike, my two kid's bikes and several neighborhood kid's bikes running. Not all stands can hold all types of bikes without risk of bike damage though. So there is one of many gotcha's in the world of buying for your future bike room.

Some tools are more specific to the brand and even the exact model of a component you have. So to buy them before you need them might be money wasted. I've got some tools I only used once to remove a component and had to use a different tool to install the new component I replaced it with. I've since found that bike shops many times will just let me bring the bike or wheel in and loosen it for me. Then I can bring it back later to tighten it. Many times for just the cost of good conversation. But YMMV.

A pedal wrench and a hand full of metric hex keys is all you need to get started. Many pedals need a wrench that is slightly thinner than most normal wrenches. Many pedals though also have a place for a hex key though. So maybe all you need are three or four specific size hex keys. And a philips and flat bladed screwdriver.
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Old 06-29-20, 12:36 PM
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I've assembled bikes without work stands many years ago. Young and stupid. You should get a work stand and hex/torx wrenches.

However, the list expands depending on your definition of assemble.

Youtube is great place to get a good idea what you need. Just search install bottom bracket, headset, crankset, etc.

John
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Old 06-29-20, 02:26 PM
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pack pcs10 work stand as a starter......

then you could get kits of all ranges

https://www.amazon.com/Bikehand-Bike...s%2C197&sr=8-5

https://www.amazon.com/BIKEHAND-Comp...4-3e7a9c0027d0

to my when I win the lottery vote https://www.electriccyclery.com/shop...YaArHYEALw_wcB
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Old 06-29-20, 02:28 PM
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I agree with buying tools as you need them and as you acquire skills.

You'll want basic mechanics tools like a set of metric Allen keys, combination wrenches, adjustable wrench and screwdrivers. Cone wrenches in 13 and 15 mm will be needed soon. Pedal wrench also, though I have a very narrow adjustable that works fine most of the time.

DItto the comment about part-specific tools, especially for the bottom bracket. There are too many "standards."

If it's an option where you live, consider volunteering at a bike coop or non-profit shop. You can get hands on most tools and figure out what's worth buying.

I also worked on my own bike for well over 30 years before I acquired a bike stand (given to me by a neighbor who was upgrading). I've built wheels without a truing stand or dishing tool, making do with primitive substitutions. A talented mechanic can make some tools from pipe, angle iron, threaded rod, etc.
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Old 06-29-20, 02:29 PM
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FastJake
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- Nice Allen wrench set
- Phillips and flathead screwdrivers
- Bike stand
- All other specialty tools as needed. Re-packing hubs? Get cone wrenches. Need to cut a chain? Get a chain tool. I personally don't see the logic in buying a tool you have no use for or don't even know what it is.
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Old 06-29-20, 02:46 PM
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Best I can remember, some bicycle-specific tools in order of procurement:
- wrench for threaded headsets
- Shimano-style freewheel puller
- crank puller
- spoke nipple key
- cone wrenches
- cassette lockring tool
- cable cutter
- outboard bearing bottom bracket tool
- torque wrench

Although I started with a decent stash of generic tools, Allen, Torx, socket wrenches etc etc.
One tool I regret not buying earlier is the pro grade pedal wrench. It would have been cheaper buying that one straight off instead of damaging several regular wrenches first.
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Old 06-29-20, 03:02 PM
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Get a good cable cutter. I have never regretted the money I spent on my Felco cutter decades ago; it still works like new.
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Old 06-29-20, 03:45 PM
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OP: Any bike of any era? Wheel building? Shimano components? Campy components? Are finances of any concern? The list could get quite long! I've never gotten beyond 9 speed of the Shimano flight deck/dual pivot/octalink era (circa 2000). There have been many "improvements" since then that often have special tools. I'd suggest looking at Park or Ebay or Amazon for a general tool kit and buy specialized tools as you need.
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Old 06-29-20, 04:59 PM
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You'll never stop buying tools with all the odd sized parts and components bikes have. There's a different tool for every part. And some of those tools will only be used once or twice. Ask me how I know.
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Old 06-29-20, 05:04 PM
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https://www.bikeforums.net/classic-v...ontribute.html

https://www.bikeforums.net/classic-v...-c-v-shop.html

https://www.bikeforums.net/classic-v...ns-photos.html

https://www.bikeforums.net/classic-v...g-cabinet.html

https://www.bikeforums.net/bicycle-m...ial-tools.html
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Old 06-29-20, 05:09 PM
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Bikeboystephen,
At some point you will see the need to get liability insurance. In today's world it is a must! I own a golf club repair business, and have worked as a professional mechanic in a high end bike shop. We had a test ride go bad one day when a girl went on a test ride with her purse slung over her shoulder. It slipped and caught in the front wheel causing a crash and a $1500 ride to the emergency room, stitches and some other bills from the docs. In my golf business only one head coming off and hitting another person will result in close to a $1 million claim. Get insurance first. Smiles, MH
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Old 06-29-20, 05:14 PM
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Good point Mad Honk

However I hope by personal shop, he/she meant just their own personal bikes.

Though whether you do your own maintenance or none at all, it still makes sense for many to have an umbrella policy to act as a catch all if you have significant assets to protect from potential lawsuits. Ask your home insurance agent about them.

Last edited by Iride01; 06-29-20 at 05:19 PM.
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Old 06-29-20, 05:16 PM
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The first thing you should get is a good bike repair manual like Lennard Zinn's "Zinn and the Art of Road (or MTB) Bike Maintenance" or the Park Tool's "Blue Book" and read them cover to cover. They will familiarize you with the range of bike repair and maintenance procedures and the required tools. Then decide what types of bikes you want to work on and what level of complexity you want to tackle. At that point you can begin to assemble the needed tools.
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Old 06-29-20, 05:30 PM
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A bench mounted vice, heavy duty. Also, two tools that are somewhat expensive and you could do without but if you have them you will use them are a Derailleur hanger alignment tool and a wheel truing stand.
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Old 06-29-20, 05:35 PM
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Originally Posted by Iride01 View Post
All you need is a bike and a place to put it that has enough room so you can move around it. Good bright lighting helps too. You might want a work stand, but I've gone well over 50 years without one. And at one time I was keeping my bike, my two kid's bikes and several neighborhood kid's bikes running. Not all stands can hold all types of bikes without risk of bike damage though. So there is one of many gotcha's in the world of buying for your future bike room.

Some tools are more specific to the brand and even the exact model of a component you have. So to buy them before you need them might be money wasted. I've got some tools I only used once to remove a component and had to use a different tool to install the new component I replaced it with. I've since found that bike shops many times will just let me bring the bike or wheel in and loosen it for me. Then I can bring it back later to tighten it. Many times for just the cost of good conversation. But YMMV.

A pedal wrench and a hand full of metric hex keys is all you need to get started. Many pedals need a wrench that is slightly thinner than most normal wrenches. Many pedals though also have a place for a hex key though. So maybe all you need are three or four specific size hex keys. And a philips and flat bladed screwdriver.
You can live without a work stand, but it's not a happy life Makes a huge difference in convenience and enjoyment. I thought it was a bit of an extravagance when I bought a low-end Park stand ~~25 years ago, but I can't imagine trying to maintain bikes now without it
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Old 06-29-20, 07:26 PM
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Originally Posted by Thomas15 View Post
.....a Derailleur hanger alignment tool and a wheel truing stand.
If he is just getting started and doesn't know either bike repair or what tools to buy, these are WAY in the future.
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Old 06-29-20, 08:14 PM
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Originally Posted by HillRider View Post
If he is just getting started and doesn't know either bike repair or what tools to buy, these are WAY in the future.
I agree but read the OP
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Old 06-29-20, 08:19 PM
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I have a shop in my basement, but the mechanic is kind of a dork.
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Old 06-29-20, 08:34 PM
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To start? High quality 4, 5, and 6mm hex/allen keys, a small In lb/nm torque wrench(very useful), a chain whip, 13-17mm cone wrenches, a bbt-9 bottom bracket tool, a crank puller and a decent set of cable cutters. With avid online shopping searches, you could score all in new or like new condition for under $50. Anything like metric sockets or an adjustable wrench you can utilize from your everyday toolchest for now.

Oh, and get some good grease! You can get a 4 oz tube of park tool polylube or any other urea base grease for under $10, a good calcium grease like Lubriplate 130-AA (10oz) for about $15, and a good lithium grease like Mobil SHC PM460 (14oz) also for about $15. I use all 3 for different applications, and those three tubes of grease would last you probably close to half a year, or way longer depending on how many bikes you're servicing.

Also as others have stressed, invest in a stand. Cringe once, enjoy the time & frustration savings well after the purchase; $40 or less for new off brand models.
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Old 06-29-20, 10:30 PM
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If you are asking the question for your own personal use, a set of allen wrenches. Everything bike related is metric. Get a cassette tool that fits your cassette, probably one big adjustable wrench. Go around your bike and see what parts it uses and get tools to work on those parts.

If you are looking to work on other people's bikes, fuhgeddaboudit. If you don't know what tools you need you aren't up to the task. I looked at a neighbor's bike last week and my hands got so dirty I swore I'd never touch another bike other than my own.
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Old 06-30-20, 12:48 AM
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+1 for everything everyone suggested.
I will add, a shop apron. Way more useful than you can imagine.
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Old 06-30-20, 06:51 AM
  #25  
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Originally Posted by Thomas15 View Post
A bench mounted vice, heavy duty. Also, two tools that are somewhat expensive and you could do without but if you have them you will use them are a Derailleur hanger alignment tool and a wheel truing stand.
I've been dabbling for a while and built or flipped quite a few bikes and haven't found the need to purchase these as yet.
6-8 speed eyeball alignment is sufficient, on the few occasions on higher speed bikes I let the shop do it for $15 rather than buy the $75 tool. So far I'm still ahead.
You can true wheels just fine using zip ties. If I were building wheels that would be a different story.
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