Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Road Cycling
Reload this Page >

Kreitler roller bearings...

Notices
Road Cycling “It is by riding a bicycle that you learn the contours of a country best, since you have to sweat up the hills and coast down them. Thus you remember them as they actually are, while in a motor car only a high hill impresses you, and you have no such accurate remembrance of country you have driven through as you gain by riding a bicycle.” -- Ernest Hemingway

Kreitler roller bearings...

Old 03-21-10, 07:36 AM
  #1  
mke-bruiser
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Posts: 5
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Kreitler roller bearings...

can someone that has replaced the bearings in their kreitler 4.5's please break down the process for me? is the threaded rod held in by threadlocker or does it thread to something internally? also, has anyone upgraded to a higher quality bearing rather than a standard 1614? thanks in advance.
mke-bruiser is offline  
Old 03-21-10, 08:12 AM
  #2  
nitropowered
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Athens, Ohio
Posts: 5,104

Bikes: Custom Custom Custom

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I haven't done it personally, but seems pretty easy. Take off the outer nuts, then tap the axle with a hammer to pop out the bearings from the drum. Just tap the bearings back into the drum to put them back in

There really is no reason to put in better bearings than stock. You want to make the training harder, not easier. I suppose you can pop in ceramics, but it would make the resistance less and would be a total waste of money
nitropowered is offline  
Old 03-21-10, 09:50 AM
  #3  
mke-bruiser
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Posts: 5
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
okay thanks. yeah i tried tapping them with my shop hammer, but since i wasnt sure that was the method i didnt tap too hard. are there just the bearings you can see or are they doubled-up anyone know?
mke-bruiser is offline  
Old 01-15-11, 11:03 AM
  #4  
dingrr
Newbie
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 1
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Just wondering how you made out with this. I have a slight clicking in two of my 4.5" Challenger drums and was thinking I should dismantle them for service or replace the bearings. Any luck?

If you replaced the bearings, what did you use and from where did you get them?
dingrr is offline  
Old 02-10-13, 05:55 PM
  #5  
merge03
Newbie
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Posts: 1
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Kreitler RS1614-ZZ

The Kreitlers come with a .375ID x 1.125OD x .375 roller bearing. Its a "shielded" bearing and not a "sealed" bearing. These bearings are more than adequate and should last anyone a good long time. But they do wear out and they do fail eventually. The generic part is a 1614-ZZ. They are about $2 each. Many places have them, try the usuals (ReidSupply, McMasterCarr, Fastenal, etc.).

They are easy to pop out using a rubber mallet on the axle (remove ALL of the nuts first!). Pressing the new bearings is doable with a piece of wood dilled for the axle. The next time I have to do this I'll probably put a bolt through a 2x4 to make sure it's pressed in straight. Of course if you have access to a hydraulic jack and can rig up to end stops, that would be even better. The first time i did this, i just carefully tapped them back in with a rubber mallet. It worked OK, just go slow and patient.

I used the standard bearings ($2 each above) last week when I did this. These bearings have a bit of drag to them, which some serious athletes may like. They also felt a little rough when riding the bike, even though they were perfectly smooth. So I subsequently ordered another set of bearings at $15 each. These run quite a bit smoother, but they up the total replacement cost from $12 to $90 for all six bearings. Not an insignificant jump. The $15 bearings have a smoother feel to them when your on the bike. The $2 bearings worked just fine mind you. In a non-scientific test, I observed that the rollers spun 6 times longer, unloaded, with the better bearings. Your mileage may vary.

Optionally one could use "fully sealed" bearings, which won't spin quite as freely unloaded. There are generic ($2 each), semi-ground ($8-$12 each) and precision-ground ($10-$15 each) shielded bearings. Originally I thought the fully gound bearings would be overkill as rollers generally spin too freely. But having now tried them both, I much prefer the fully-ground $15 bearings (each). All of the 1614 bearings are designed for radial loads and come in sealed and sheilded versions. I ended up with RBC Bearings, NICE series, Made in the USA, 1614DSTNTG18.

When setting them back up, don't tighten the lock nuts into the bearing. Leave a subtle amount of endplay on the axle. I should easily get yet another 20 years out of these rollers now with new bearings. Need to repaint the rails this summer though.

The end cap nuts are 5/8" and the bearing lock nuts are 9/16". You'll need two 9/16 wrenches. The lock nuts are narrow, so if one of your 9/16" wrenches is narrow, that will make the job go much smoother.

Last edited by merge03; 02-23-13 at 03:55 PM. Reason: update details
merge03 is offline  
Likes For merge03:
Old 01-28-18, 09:35 AM
  #6  
rotuserp
Newbie
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Posts: 1
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thank you!

Merge03,

Many thanks,

Your post was spot-on and extremely helpful. I ordered the recommended NICE bearing after detecting I had one roller which was both noisy and not spinning as smoothly as the others. I bought my 4.5's used and suspect the drive-side bearing for the Headwind fan was the culprit as that belt is mighty tight. After tapping out the axle is was obvious one bearing blew all its grease out. I change both since it everything was apart.

As you cited, a thinner 9/16 wrench is a must. Tappet-style automotive open-ends are perfect for this (if you happen to have one . . .).

To add for others - I chased the threads of the axle BEFORE removing the two 9/16' nuts with a 3/8"-16 (pitch) die as they were a bit mashed and it made disassembly/re-assembly much easier. Q-tip cleaning the bearing recess in the polycap and adding a drop of 3-in-1 oil on the new bearing's outer circumference before re-pressing the bearing in also aids in an easier job.
rotuserp is offline  
Related Topics
Thread
Thread Starter
Forum
Replies
Last Post
NoWhammies
General Cycling Discussion
41
09-16-19 03:08 PM
migrantwing
Bicycle Mechanics
0
09-20-16 08:51 AM
Tandem Tom
Bicycle Mechanics
4
10-06-15 08:27 AM
Juan Foote
Road Cycling
2
03-23-12 10:18 PM

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.