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Cyclists' safety ... on the road

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Cyclists' safety ... on the road

Old 07-13-19, 09:11 PM
  #76  
Chris0516
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Originally Posted by holytrousers View Post
When you encounter other cyclists putting themselves in danger, do you try to advice them or do you simply ignore them ?
I have a verbal word with them.
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Old 07-21-19, 12:18 PM
  #77  
sirjag
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Originally Posted by holytrousers View Post
He replies confidently that everything is in god's hands.
Ugh, I pretty much stop listening to people when they play that card....foolish people and their sky daddy....

JAG
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Old 07-22-19, 10:16 PM
  #78  
chstan
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This is something I have noticed a lot recently as well
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Old 11-16-19, 11:55 PM
  #79  
Vintage Schwinn
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Perhaps some of you may enjoy reading
the MAY 1958 Popular Mechanics, magazine article on pages 122 - 126 and 232-234.
' TEACH BICYCLISTS HOW TO LIVE' - by Richard F. Dempewolff

--You can GOOGLE Popular Mechanics May 1958 , then just scroll through to the pages of that article.


Much has not changed in the nearly sixty-two years since that article was written.
Sure, bicycles and bicycle technology has radically changed, but the average rider has not
become much more intelligent in the manner in which they choose to ride.
City planners and their civil engineering departments do consider cyclist safety now, where
in the fifties, probably zero thought was given to storm water drain grates, whether positioned
verticle or horizontal where the cycle's tire could sink in the area between the grate's bars.
Still, despite helmets, today, you have many idiot cyclists who feel that they are equal to
automobiles and trucks on the streets. Yes, of course, unless it is a limited access roadway/highway
that prohibits non-motorized transportation, the bicycle is permitted to be ridden there.
The huge difference that too many idiot zealot cyclists fail to factor in is that no roadway is ever
perfect and humans fail to pay attention, sometimes get distracted, get tired, get blinded by the sun,
are talking on the phone, texting, eating french fries, fiddling with the radio, or Whatever MISTAKE
that ultimately places there vehicle into the ACCIDENTAL collision with the Bicycle.
UNFORTUNATELY, A MINOR LOW SPEED COLLISION THAT IF IT WERE JUST BETWEEN
TWO AUTOMOBILES, WOULD PROBABLY ONLY DO MAYBE $3000 DAMAGE TO THE
VEHICLE THAT IS HIT, AND SAID VEHICLE WOULD LIKELY BE DRIVEABLE AND IT WOULD
BE UNLIKELY THAT ANY PASSENGERS WOULD BE INJURED. That same LOW SPEED
ACCIDENTAL COLLISION WITH A BICYCLE has a Very Realistic Probability of a Very Severe
Injury.......paralyzed, wheelchair bound for life, or Fatal Injury to the Cyclist! For this reason,
one cannot assume that a BICYCLE is equal to a four thousand pound SUV.
Some of the other old folks here might recall the late sixties Ad-Council Public Service Campaign that was
everywhere in print ads, billboards, radio, and television: "WATCH OUT FOR THE OTHER GUY"
--it was aimed at reducing automobile accidents, in the era before shoulder harnesses and improved/mandated
breakaway steering columns, etc and before realistic DUI enforcement, and decades before people actually
would wear seat belts. Yes, this defensive driving appeal catch phrase seems so simple and instictive but
like the ARRIVE ALIVE catch phrase that the state of Florida was using at that time..........it goes without
saying but as simple as those phrases are, many folks then, as many drivers today are not attentive to what
they should be focused on behind the wheel. I would argue that todays' driver is much more shut-off to the
world around them, as 25 watt car stereos did not exist fifty years ago, relatively few cars had A/C in 1965 and
probably less than 1% in 1958. Todays cars are better, safer, and have better braking and some have collision
avoidance/alert features, but humans are not too much different than sixty years ago, except possibly in the
weight and waist size of the typical American. You can probably bet that if Bud Anderson, or Wally Cleaver had
touch screen displays, 180 watt stereo, bluetooth, the latest GPS, the newest I-phone......they would be texting,
distracted no matter what their father who knew best, warned them about the importance of driving safely and responsibly.
People who drive motor vehicles are going to make minor mistakes at some time in their lives. You all know that.
Many of us have been involved traffic accidents, either as driver or passenger at some point, even if all of them were
because of the fault of another vehicle's driver.
What I am saying is that, the cyclist must be aware and do everything in his/her power to minimize the probability of
a collision with a motorist, or a crash caused by hitting a pothole or debris which could then cause them to veer or
be tossed into the path of a motorist because 4000 pounds versus 26 pound bicycle with a 180 pound rider is going
to be a catastrophic event. Bicycles are not equal to cars. Many bicyclists need an "attitude-adjustment" and realize
that they must always assess the situation and calculate accordingly, as one cannot blindly assume anything and the
cyclist needs to realize when it is SMART to ride slower than they normally would, and when it may be smart to get off
of the bicycle and Walk CROSS with crosswalk light. I will further argue that there are certain situations in which
it is SMART to ride the SIDEWALK instead of the highly trafficked road, if there are no other alternative streets with
little traffic that can be chosen for an alternate route.
Folks, you can argue until you're blue in the face that bicyclists have the same right to use any street as a car, but
what the heck is the point of being absolutely correct but potentially seriously injured or having your family plan your
funeral. Be Realistic, Be smart, Be Alert and continue to be an advocate for improved awareness and cyclist safety on public roads!
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Old 11-17-19, 11:02 PM
  #80  
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Originally Posted by holytrousers View Post
When you encounter other cyclists putting themselves in danger, do you try to advice them or do you simply ignore them ?
That is subjective. To one's own cycling style, fears, and confidence. Also, The law in a given locale
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