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New bike came in...very happy..questions for longer distances

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Road Cycling ďIt is by riding a bicycle that you learn the contours of a country best, since you have to sweat up the hills and coast down them. Thus you remember them as they actually are, while in a motor car only a high hill impresses you, and you have no such accurate remembrance of country you have driven through as you gain by riding a bicycle.Ē -- Ernest Hemingway

New bike came in...very happy..questions for longer distances

Old 05-12-20, 09:23 AM
  #26  
noodle soup
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Originally Posted by Bah Humbug View Post
Almost no experienced road cyclists (as opposed to mountain bikers, tourers, etc) wear a Camelbak or any backpack.

And that paint is beautiful.
The paint is beautiful, but I don't care for the way the front brake line is routed.
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Old 05-12-20, 09:30 AM
  #27  
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I started out mountain biking for many years until transitioning to mostly riding on the road. I still prefer a Camelbak on rides longer than an hour. I just find it more convenient than reaching for a bottle. It allows me to carry more water as well, and I do tend to drink a lot. I do have one that is fairly aero. It basically just holds water. I use a saddlebag for tools.
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Old 05-12-20, 09:52 AM
  #28  
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Originally Posted by stevel610 View Post
Nice bike!

Wear what you want.

You being in their group will make their perception in public better. Not as many people will think of them as tool like tour de France wannabe's. 😉
At the risk of beating a dead horse, I do think this sentiment is misguided. Since when does wearing a bike jersey turn one into a "Tour de France wannabe"? We are talking about a bike jersey, not matching pro replica kit, (not that there is anything wrong with that if you are a fan of a particular rider or pro team).
Every activity has a certain uniform, or look. Runners don't wear golf shoes, and golfers don't wear trainers. At least most don't. And basketball players don't play in hiking boots. And finally, nobody who wears a replica LeBron jersey is called a LeBron wannabe, even if that person never steps on a basketball court. But somehow, a road cyclist who wears a bike jersey is some kind of poseur? Why?
Cycling jerseys are built with performance in mind, and it really doesn't matter if you are a pro racer or a weekend club rider. True, wearing an aero jersey probably won't make you any faster. It is useful to have back pockets to hold your stuff, and a front zipper for easy on and off, and temperature regulation when it gets hot.
All that said, it is true. You can get by wearing just about anything. But except for reverse snobs, I think most people come around to wearing the proper attire for the activity eventually..
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Old 05-12-20, 11:02 AM
  #29  
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Originally Posted by MRT2 View Post
True, wearing an aero jersey probably won't make you any faster.
Actually, a snug fitting kit is one of the best things, next to your position, that you can do for speed. The drag created by even just wrinkles is measurable, let alone fabric flapping in the wind.

But that's less of the point here, for a casual rider, a hydration pack is not going to slow you down that much. The fact that it is shunned by the road crowd, when it's actually very useful, just goes to show how "most" roadies can be. I could have been a lil faster on my last couple of centuries without the hydration pack, but it allowed me to not have to stop for water anywhere so I'll take the aero hit, if anything, a lil extra drag makes for a good workout. lol
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Old 05-12-20, 11:16 AM
  #30  
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Originally Posted by MRT2 View Post
Since when does wearing a bike jersey turn one into a "Tour de France wannabe"?
"tool like" being a tool is part of it. It isn't about the jersey, or bike but attitude that creates "tool like" perception. But I'm not so gifted with punctuation or words so thanks for clarifying 😁👍.

Thanks for the response.😉
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Old 05-12-20, 12:29 PM
  #31  
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Many folks end up transporting their bike in the back seat, or the trunk- with the front wheel removed, on a sheet or blanket.
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Old 05-12-20, 12:46 PM
  #32  
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Starting out, prioritize being prepared and self-sufficient. Especially if you're riding solo and aren't familiar with your options for rest stops to refill water. Style can come later, and anyways style looks better when it's backed by substance. Once you become accustomed to road cycling, you'll both look the part and act it too.
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Old 05-12-20, 01:28 PM
  #33  
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For road rides too long for 3 water bottles (two in cages and one in center jersey pocket), I have no problem with using a Camelback.

The contention that it is "too uncomfortable" is nonsense. Less comfortable is true. But riding your bike is less comfortable that sitting on your couch, so why are you riding in the first place? Mountain bikers use Camelbacks all the time, and they (generally) ride much more slowly (less cooling from moving air, so sweaty back is more likely/more severe), and are moving around a lot more (Camelback is shifting around on their backs more). They put up with it because they are often far from a place where they can replenish fluids in their bottles, and running out of fluids is a LOT more "uncomfortable" than a little sweat on your back.

If you'd rather stop more frequently than carry a Camelback, then fine, that's a personal preference. I've used Camelbacks on many 4+ hour road rides, both summer and winter, with no issues - yes, my back is a little more sweaty, but it really isn't that big of a deal, I'm sweating all over anyway. I hate to stop during a ride, I'd rather keep going for 6 hours than have to stop every 2 or 3 hours to get more fluids. But, that's me.

If a Camelback works for you on road rides, I don't see a reason to stop.
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Old 05-12-20, 02:14 PM
  #34  
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Get a camelbac if you want one. They are good products. I would consider the LR models, they sit
lower on the back. Once on a long ride I had to stop to refill and two water fountains were shut down at two different parks. No fun. Big bottles or big capacity camelbacs. The important thing is to have to much water.out riding you may come across another rider or jogger that needs water in the summer. One can never have to much water.
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Old 05-13-20, 12:59 PM
  #35  
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Every time I see a roadie with a Camelback on my first thought is "Cool, that person must be going on a VERY LONG ride!". Point being, people do it, if it works for you, go for it! I have gone on 'fast' rides with panniers mounted on my road bike and they did not detract from my enjoyment of the ride.

If you're trying to squeeze every bit of speed and power, then a camelback/panniers/etc. may not be optimal.
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Old 05-13-20, 01:06 PM
  #36  
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Originally Posted by MRT2 View Post
At the risk of beating a dead horse, I do think this sentiment is misguided. Since when does wearing a bike jersey turn one into a "Tour de France wannabe"? We are talking about a bike jersey, not matching pro replica kit, (not that there is anything wrong with that if you are a fan of a particular rider or pro team).
Every activity has a certain uniform, or look. Runners don't wear golf shoes, and golfers don't wear trainers. At least most don't. And basketball players don't play in hiking boots. And finally, nobody who wears a replica LeBron jersey is called a LeBron wannabe, even if that person never steps on a basketball court. But somehow, a road cyclist who wears a bike jersey is some kind of poseur? Why?
Cycling jerseys are built with performance in mind, and it really doesn't matter if you are a pro racer or a weekend club rider. True, wearing an aero jersey probably won't make you any faster. It is useful to have back pockets to hold your stuff, and a front zipper for easy on and off, and temperature regulation when it gets hot.
All that said, it is true. You can get by wearing just about anything. But except for reverse snobs, I think most people come around to wearing the proper attire for the activity eventually..
So true. Jerseys are functional and to me, 100% beneficial and required. I donít wear pro kits but I do buy bright obnoxious colors at times to only be visible. Because at the end of a ride.......I want it to be successful and of benefit and not a marker on a road of ďhere is where he died on his bike!Ē
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Old 05-13-20, 01:50 PM
  #37  
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I have used a camelbak on occasion. I live in Florida where you can count on it to be pretty much Humid and Hot most of the year. During long rides where the ability to refill bottles may not be possible or truly feasible, I used the camelbak. Generally speaking, I tend to bring a larger bottle (bidon) that holds ~750mL and with two of those I'm usually fine unless it is something out of the norm. Depending on your conditions and duration, you may want to consider doing the same with one of the bottles having an electrolyte drink in it. There are tons of different ones so check some reviews. My tri-friends like a brand called Infinit due to the ability to customize (should you want/need to) what and how much of everything that is in the mix.

Look on Amazon for Jerseys and Bibs. You can get some bib shorts and jerseys for lower cost. They wont be Assos, Castelli, Giordana, etc level of quality but they are also significantly less cost. If you are like me, you will start slimming down pretty decently if you regularly ride and will likely go through a few sizes before your weight and build stabilizes. The brand of bibs I got when I started were Prazewalski (or something close). There are a lot of reviews and they will/can/do totally work until you are ready to spend $$$ on better and more well-known brands. The jerseys I started with were Sponeed. Again, not the best or anything, but they will allow you to get started and have the pockets you will likely need.

Not really germane to the topic, however I would definitely look at getting some lights. You never know if weather can change or something happens and it gets dark faster than expected. Same for the saddle bag if you do not have one already with the various flat kit stuff. Once you get the lights, you can (should you choose, remove your reflectors (if legally allowed to where you are at). I got some good-natured teasing before I removed mine and apparently it is one of those "Cyclist things". The bike looks great and keep at it.
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Old 05-13-20, 04:35 PM
  #38  
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Originally Posted by autonomy View Post
Every time I see a roadie with a Camelback on my first thought is "Cool, that person must be going on a VERY LONG ride!". Point being, people do it, if it works for you, go for it! I have gone on 'fast' rides with panniers mounted on my road bike and they did not detract from my enjoyment of the ride.

If you're trying to squeeze every bit of speed and power, then a camelback/panniers/etc. may not be optimal.
Though the OP is referencing going for longer rides vs. the 20 miles he's doing currently.. So let's say 50 miles. There should be no question that a Camelback makes no sense for this, unless you're riding thru a barren desert with nowhere to stop. A sweaty weighted bag on your back is not something you'd seek to add because it looks 'cool'.
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Old 05-13-20, 04:49 PM
  #39  
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congrats on the bike. It looks sweet!

Lidel usually has some sweet deals on cycling jerseys. I recently got a pair for 2 dollars each. Nothing fancy but they work well. Three back pockets plus a small pocket with a zipper. Just thought I would share.

Oh, and if hasnít been said by bibs over shorts. A lot more comfortable.
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Old 05-13-20, 06:46 PM
  #40  
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Widefoot.

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Old 05-13-20, 08:08 PM
  #41  
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Being around other cyclists is kind of like being around your peer group from Jr. High. You will be judged heavily on stupid details! There are the things the ďcool kidsĒ do and the things that the cool kids laugh at behind your back. Although I get more of that from forums than the real world, where fewer people seem to care.

For 20 mile flat rides, a single 26 oz bottle in your bottle cage should do the trick. I take two 26 bottles (2 cages) on every ride. One usually has a Gatorade-like drink for the sugar and salts. I refill at known water stops as necessary. I really donít want anything on my back if I can avoid it.

I often wear a Camelbak when I mountain bike because I have to take a medical kit and supplies for the kids I coach. I like that I can take a huge supply of water. On my long-travel MTB, itís hard to reach the cage so I almost never use it. On my racing MTB, itís much easier to reach the cage.

The big disadvantage of the Camelbak is that itís heavy and keeps your back from cooling as well as it would without. But, regardless, do what you find easy and comfortable. Itís important to have lots of water. And always a little food/sugar in case you need it. Dehydration or a lack of sugar/salt will kill a rise.

And for sure get a saddle bag. Simple bike tool, tube, levers, CO2, tire boot, patch kit. No way am I putting that on my back. I do put a small pump in my jersey, though.
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Old 05-13-20, 08:32 PM
  #42  
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OK, first off I will preface this with the fact the In have been riding a very long time, long before mountain bikes were even an idea and I raced a bunch of USCF stuff way back when. Your enjoyment of the riding experience should never be attenuated by the negativity of others. Do what feels natural and comfortable to you - you seem like a reasonable person from your brief post, and if there are some "local hotshoes" who look askance at your preferences for hydration needs being met by a camelback you need to find some new riding partners. I never underestimate a guy wearing a camelback, and I have had my shorts handed to me by some truly world class racers.
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Old 05-13-20, 08:55 PM
  #43  
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When I first started road cycling, I used a simple 2L Camelbak for a few years. I used a saddle bag for the usual stuff and wore a cycling jersey with pockets. The Camelbak didn't interfere with the pockets. I did get some crap about it from "style men" who are all about what you look like, not how you ride. I didn't care about that.

I know there are large Camelbaks with pockets, etc. I don't think those are a good idea. If you're going to need it on the bike, it has to be in your jersey pocket. The saddle bag is for stuff you'd have to stop to mess with anyway, like punctures and clothing changes, food to refill jersey pockets.

I never thought a Camelbak was hot, quite the contrary. On hot days, I'd stuff it full of ice and add water. It'd be cold on my back. One of the issues with bottles is that the contents get hot so quickly. Insulated bottles aren't that great because they're hard to squeeze and hold less water. A Camelbak is so much better in those respects, plus it's 2 liters! I never noticed that it was heavy or caused any back discomfort.

The main reason I used a Camelbak is because I felt so much safer using it than a bottle. It's always convenient to take a suck from a hose. That convenience leads to better hydration. The other thing is that I'd carry liquid food in a 24 oz. or liter water bottle, so I could be carrying 3 liters if I wanted, only water in the Camelbak.

After a few years of doing group endurance rides, I got more comfortable with bottles and that's what I use now on most rides. I still use that Camelback on long difficult rides. I'm noticeably faster well hydrated and also faster the less I have to stop. Riding the one-day STP or similar, I only need to stop every 50-60 miles for a refill in summer. There's a 10,000' century in the North Cascades with the only water at the halfway point. Camelbak.
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Old 05-14-20, 07:04 AM
  #44  
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Good looking bike. Enjoy your new ride.
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Old 05-14-20, 12:13 PM
  #45  
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Originally Posted by lykbutta View Post
One question I had for the group, I started hitting 20 mile rides and I’ve been doing ok I guess, just hit 80 minutes for a 20 min stretch today. I want to start venturing to longer rides and wondered if y’all wear camelbaks by chance.
No because that would be sweaty and unpleasant in warm weather.

I bring 1.5 liters of water in two bottles on my frame, which is enough for four hours in temperate weather at which point I need to pause briefly anyways to relieve my self.

On long rides(100-200 miles) I bring an additional 1L platypus in a trunk bag in case I miss a stop or it gets hot later in the day. A bikepacking saddle bag would work as well.
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Old 05-14-20, 12:18 PM
  #46  
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Originally Posted by venturi95 View Post
OK, first off I will preface this with the fact the In have been riding a very long time, long before mountain bikes were even an idea and I raced a bunch of USCF stuff way back when. Your enjoyment of the riding experience should never be attenuated by the negativity of others. Do what feels natural and comfortable to you - you seem like a reasonable person from your brief post, and if there are some "local hotshoes" who look askance at your preferences for hydration needs being met by a camelback you need to find some new riding partners. I never underestimate a guy wearing a camelback, and I have had my shorts handed to me by some truly world class racers.
Very much this. However, some of that peer pressure is driven by people clumsily attempting to pass on advice. There are things (bibs/shorts, jerseys, chamois butter, bottle cages, clipless) that are almost universally preferred by cyclists once they try, and will likely be preferred by you once you gain some experience and try them. However, there's no need to rush it while you're in the early stages of the hobby.

Then there are stupid things like sock height.
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Old 05-18-20, 01:06 PM
  #47  
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THAT's the bike I have been dancing around getting but waiting to see it my budget and this covid-19 thing works out. What a sweet bike with the 105 and hyd disk brakes. As to your question, I would just add another bottle holder and an under-the-seat pack. That you cover most 20-60 mile rides for me.
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Old 05-18-20, 01:49 PM
  #48  
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I guess it depends on where you ride and the availability of water. For short rides at higher intensity, 1-2 hours or so, I'll just bring a single 500ml bottle. For longer endurance rides I'll bring a single 750ml bottle and refill it as needed. I recently extended my endurance distance from 65mi/6000ft to 85mi/6500ft (I like to keep it above 5h and have been getting faster) and wasn't sure where I'd find water along the way, so put a second bottle cage on the bike and brought a second empty bottle that I filled up for the unknown stretch. (For the locals, that leg was from Stinson Beach north to Point Reyes Station, then to Fairfax via Nicasio Reservoir and Nicasio Rd - the latter a potentially dry and hot stretch.) But alas, as I rolled through Point Reyes Station I noticed they have very nice public restrooms with a water fountain outside, so in the future I won't need a second bottle. At endurance effort stopping as needed to fill a water bottle, have a GU gel and enjoy the view, or just stop and chat is all just fine. The key property (for me) is moving time at a specific HR range. If there was no water anywhere along the way and I was completely out in the boonies I'd consider a camelback, or a saddle mount dual bottle holder.

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Old 05-18-20, 02:32 PM
  #49  
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I have been pretty steady around the 20 mile range still, just improving my time. Iím reallllly loving the bike and I think this one will
work for me for some time until I learn more. I have 2 Looney Bin water bottle holders, one holds my 32oz hydro flask and I carry my 20 oz hydro flask as backup. I have started finding Iím barely getting through my 32 oz one and Iím going farther before needing water.
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Old 05-18-20, 02:57 PM
  #50  
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Nice bike my man. Contratz! I have a very similar bike, a 2018 Giant Contend SL1 Disc. Got about 2K miles on it, purchased in June 2019. Prior to that I had a Walmart $150 hybrid Schwinn. Started out 230lbs and only making it 10mi and was exhausted. But like you I got the bug and just kept at it. After 2K miles on that hybrid doing a 20mile loop, I upgraded to the Giant and haven’t looked back. Love everything about the bike.

I use a 3L camel bag and two 28oz bottles. I only use the camel when I do my big ride once a month. For me that is now a 55-60 mile trek! My typical ride is 43miles and I’m holding a pretty steady 17.5 mph pace with about 2K in climbing. Amazing to think about it really, after my 60mile ride the next day I do a slow pace recovery ride that is way faster than anything I did two years ago!

Anyways keep it up man and good luck. Like you, I can wait to see where this journey takes me.



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