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Hydration Backpacks for Roadies?

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Hydration Backpacks for Roadies?

Old 08-10-20, 10:55 AM
  #26  
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Originally Posted by PoorInRichfield View Post
Many good points!

And now I'm wondering... Who says the bottle one sticks in one's jersey pocket has to actually be an uncomfortable bottle? Perhaps a different shaped container or even a bag might be better...

I have the blue one. Never loved it.
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Old 08-10-20, 11:42 AM
  #27  
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I have always used a camel back when riding. I find it more comfortable having a light pack on my back then using bottles. No reaching for bottles! This is the one I use: https://www.amazon.com/CamelBak-Hydr.../dp/B01MT1O9X2

I did put a larger bladder in though cuz 50n ounces wasn't enough.
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Old 08-10-20, 12:19 PM
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i just got a Osprey Kitari 1.5 litre. I found it the perfect size and weight for road cycling. it adds the equivalent of 2 bottles to your ride.

https://www.osprey.com/ca/en/product...OINT5_119.html
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Old 08-10-20, 01:34 PM
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It's your choice but I would not like riding with a camelbak/backpack.

I ride on familiar roads and have scoped out water sources (gas stations or state parks often have a spigot or faucet that is open to the public) so I can stop every 20-30 miles for a quick fill-up.
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Old 08-10-20, 06:51 PM
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you can add another bottle cage under downtube, you can also get a aftermarket fork with mounts where you can attach up to 4 extra bottles
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Old 08-10-20, 10:41 PM
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Originally Posted by PoorInRichfield View Post
Yeah, I'm considering the Tacx Cage Mount which is only $20 (Plus the cost of two more bottles and cages).
I've used an Elite Skekane which, depending on the shape of your saddle rails, may or may not be a pain to install. But on the upside, it has enough space to still fit a small saddle bag (if necessary) and a rear light (with the right mount).
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Old 08-11-20, 05:38 AM
  #32  
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I tour with a Camelbak Hydrobak. 50 Oz. Its small compared to many packs. Has one medium size zippered pocket.

https://www.camelbak.com/en/packs/R0...34a09a0dc04930
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Old 08-11-20, 04:27 PM
  #33  
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I've had this same thought, in wanting to extend my rides out and not wanting to use our regular water sources during COVID. I had one 24 oz and one 21 oz bottle. Now I've picked up another 24. I also carry one of those flex bottles that holds about half a liter and goes into the back pocket. I use it first and then squish it down. So over 50 oz of water should take me into the range I want.
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Old 08-11-20, 07:12 PM
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The Camelbak Chase vests were specifically designed for cycling and are pretty minimalist:

https://www.camelbak.com/en/vests/bike
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Old 08-11-20, 07:22 PM
  #35  
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I have a Nathan pack similar to this:

https://www.nathansports.com/collect...ation-backpack

It is not as bulky as it looks on the site. Mine hold 70 oz. in the bladder and is small enough to use for trail running I don't really notice it. I have used it on road rides before and it works great for that as well.
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Old 08-12-20, 05:24 AM
  #36  
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I always use a backpack for MTB, but find it a drag on the road.

Many companies offer water bottle cage mounts that can strap/clamp to a downtube or seat post. Ive had good luck with these.

I also used one of those double cage things that mounts under the saddle, but was not crazy about it.

Personally, Id rather just carry some extra water than have to plan my ride around water stops.
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Old 08-12-20, 09:51 PM
  #37  
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I've been using a 2-liter Camelbak for ~25 years, not the same one though. It's the simplest one, no pockets, no gadgets, just a cloth sack with bladder and straps. It's great, love it. I mostly use bottles, but the bladder is wonderful for long rides, gives me a 4 liter capacity on a regular 2 cage frame.
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Old 08-12-20, 10:53 PM
  #38  
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Used handlebar bags to store extra bottles... didn't like it. Took away handlebar space.
Didn't bother with waist hydration belt. Sweat drips to your lower back so it gets mushy there.
Tried mountain bike hydration pack, overkill and too much storage. Still use the pack for mountain biking though, it (Osprey Raptor 15) doesn't work very well for hunched over position on a road bike.

The closest I found that works is running hydration vest with minimal storage (5 to 10 liters), and put a 2L hydration bladder in the back and wear it like a vest.

I have this: https://www.aliexpress.com/item/33026101954.html Very flexible fabric. It has front flex bottle pockets to put 2 500mL flex bottles to extent the water capacity to 3L. You'll need to supply your own 2L bladder.
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Old 08-13-20, 05:42 AM
  #39  
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Ive had great luck using these to mount extra cages to a downtube (steel bike so it was narrow), seat post, and a handlebar,

https://www.amazon.com/Minoura-WBTC9.../dp/B003L9BEBQ
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Old 08-13-20, 06:13 AM
  #40  
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Originally Posted by Cue View Post
Didn't bother with waist hydration belt. Sweat drips to your lower back so it gets mushy there.
LOL! First there was "trench foot", then there was "mushy back"
Originally Posted by Cue View Post
Tried mountain bike hydration pack, overkill and too much storage.
Yeah, that's what I meant in my original post in that I'm not looking for a backpack that will have enough storage to climb Mount Everest. Granted, if one is wearing a backpack, that kind of renders one's jersey pockets useless so maybe some kind of storage pocket would be useful, like to hold a pump?

I knew that if I searched long enough, I'd eventually find the version of the Camelbak that was roadie specific that I knew existed once... but apparently was so unpopular that it no longer exists :-(
https://bikerumor.com/2012/05/10/rev...ted-reservoir/

Camelbak’s marketing guy, Seth, is the first to admit this product’s not one of their top sellers, but the more time I’ve spent with it, the more I like it. On quick trips, it saves precious packing space versus a full pack while still giving me plenty to drink on those rides (more than what you’d get by relying on two full bottles!). And in big group rides or fast paced bunches, it’s easier and arguably safer to throw the hose in your mouth and get your hands back on the bar quickly than fiddle with bottles.

Last edited by PoorInRichfield; 08-13-20 at 06:32 AM.
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Old 08-13-20, 06:58 AM
  #41  
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About 20 years ago, I built a camelback like system that fit around my waist. When filled with water, it made me look really fat but helped to keep me cool and was almost hidden from view. I found that when wearing that, I could enter the clydesdale class in MTB races and no one would bat an eye. As I would race and drink, I would get lighter and lighter and by the end, I was my normal 180lb finishing the race.

I unfortunately never won this way. I had to stop and pee way too many times. But it sure was fun.

And yes, this is a joke.

But in reality, I also have an old camelback - the very first kind - that is nothing but a black sleeve that I fill and use for longer road rides (>90 miles). Works well and honestly, does not cause much of an issue.
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Old 08-13-20, 07:24 AM
  #42  
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The more I think about it, the more I like the idea of a Camelbak-like device for when I'm riding gravel or just bumpy roads. Having a water backpack as a water bottle replacement (instead of just additional water) would eliminate the issue of launching water bottles when riding on bumpy roads (something that has happened to me on occasion.)
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Old 08-13-20, 08:35 AM
  #43  
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Originally Posted by PoorInRichfield View Post
LOL! First there was "trench foot", then there was "mushy back"

Yeah, that's what I meant in my original post in that I'm not looking for a backpack that will have enough storage to climb Mount Everest. Granted, if one is wearing a backpack, that kind of renders one's jersey pockets useless so maybe some kind of storage pocket would be useful, like to hold a pump?

I knew that if I searched long enough, I'd eventually find the version of the Camelbak that was roadie specific that I knew existed once... but apparently was so unpopular that it no longer exists :-(
https://bikerumor.com/2012/05/10/rev...ted-reservoir/




In all fairness, this failed for a reason. People are looking for hydration packs. i don't think anybody wants to buy a specific base layer so that it's integrated. Camelbak is already pretty expensive, imagine a product that includes a base layer and is marketed to roadies? it'd probably be $400
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Old 08-13-20, 09:16 AM
  #44  
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Originally Posted by PoorInRichfield View Post
LOL! First there was "trench foot", then there was "mushy back"

Yeah, that's what I meant in my original post in that I'm not looking for a backpack that will have enough storage to climb Mount Everest. Granted, if one is wearing a backpack, that kind of renders one's jersey pockets useless so maybe some kind of storage pocket would be useful, like to hold a pump?

I knew that if I searched long enough, I'd eventually find the version of the Camelbak that was roadie specific that I knew existed once... but apparently was so unpopular that it no longer exists :-(
https://bikerumor.com/2012/05/10/rev...ted-reservoir/


Running vests are much better implementation of that baselayer reservoir. Running vests are short enough and high enough on your torso so that you still have access to your rear pockets.
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Old 08-13-20, 09:23 AM
  #45  
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Originally Posted by Cowboy905 View Post
In all fairness, this failed for a reason.
Yup.. understood. That and roadies are on average a very traditional and peculiar bunch that don't like change. Wearing a backpack instead of carrying two water bottles is change. We don't like change.
Originally Posted by Cue View Post
Running vests are much better implementation of that baselayer reservoir. Running vests are short enough and high enough on your torso so that you still have access to your rear pockets.
I think you're right. One big limitation I see to the Camelbak Racebak is that my jersey's don't like have enough extra room in the chest area to accommodate the hump. I have a feeling like the jersey would fit uber-tight in the chest area when the bag is full. However, I do like the idea that the bag is integrated into the base layer so that there aren't any straps. I have 2 CamelBaks for summer and winter hiking and find the straps uncomfortable and annoying.
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Old 08-13-20, 10:19 AM
  #46  
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Originally Posted by PoorInRichfield View Post
Yup.. understood. That and roadies are on average a very traditional and peculiar bunch that don't like change.
Truth^^^^
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Old 08-13-20, 10:56 AM
  #47  
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Originally Posted by PoorInRichfield View Post
Yup.. understood. That and roadies are on average a very traditional and peculiar bunch that don't like change. Wearing a backpack instead of carrying two water bottles is change. We don't like change.
It's not a matter of not liking change - it's a matter of it being a solution to something that's rarely a problem. We're not talking about traversing the Mojave Wasteland - we're talking about rural WI, which is not much different from the rural MN roads that I ride week and and week out. Finding someplace for water and a snack once every 30-40 miles is easy peasy.
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Old 08-13-20, 11:07 AM
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Originally Posted by WhyFi View Post
It's not a matter of not liking change - it's a matter of it being a solution to something that's rarely a problem.
Note I didn't state that every road cyclist doesn't like change, but I've been around the block a few times and it's pretty clear that stereotypically speaking, roadies resist change. Don't believe me? Do a search for "steal vs carbon" or "caliper vs disc brakes" if you want to read hours of pointless arguing."Eddy Merckx didn't need no stinkin' backpack, clipless pedals, or fancy plastic bike... neither do I!" hehehe...

Yes, for most of my rides, simple water bottles do the trick. I'm just probably over-analyzing a way to carry more water on a ride and am likely to be the 1 person that would try something like a Camelback Racebak... and like it.
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Old 08-13-20, 11:15 AM
  #49  
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Wow. I just went and looked at Camelbak's offerings. They have gone nutso. It's all image and silliness. IMO. Here's what you want, something practical, something like this: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B088PJVM4K...ing=UTF8&psc=1

Nothing extra, just the water please. Only thing: for sure I'd cut off that stupid valve and put on the 90 Camelbak Ergo Hydrolock and Big Bite valve. This is way better than the Raceback IMO.
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Old 08-13-20, 11:51 AM
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Originally Posted by PoorInRichfield View Post
Note I didn't state that every road cyclist doesn't like change, but I've been around the block a few times and it's pretty clear that stereotypically speaking, roadies resist change. Don't believe me? Do a search for "steal vs carbon" or "caliper vs disc brakes" if you want to read hours of pointless arguing."Eddy Merckx didn't need no stinkin' backpack, clipless pedals, or fancy plastic bike... neither do I!" hehehe...
I'm talking about *this* market segment. Yes, I know that many road cyclists are stuck with whatever gear was around in their formative years, but when it comes to hydration packs, there's a reason that they're more popular with MTB and gravel as opposed to road cyclists - road cyclists aren't typically off in the middle of the wilderness, or on a singletrack up the side of the mountain... they're on roads. Roads that leads to and from pockets of civilization. If you rides take you far afield, cool, do what you've gotta do. But for most, it's a solution looking for a problem.

Originally Posted by PoorInRichfield View Post
I'm just probably over-analyzing a way to carry more water on a ride
Probably.




Originally Posted by PoorInRichfield View Post
...and am likely to be the 1 person that would try something like a Camelback Racebak... and like it.
If you want an affectation to signal that you're not a "stereotypical roadie" go for it, but it's more expensive, more cumbersome and more uncomfortable than necessary.
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