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Loaded touring wheels...

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Loaded touring wheels...

Old 02-25-11, 03:28 PM
  #26  
Ronno6
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Originally Posted by sbeatonNJ View Post
I am rocking some Sun Rhyno Lite rims with XT hubs, 36 spokes 14 gauage, 3x in front, 4x in back. I chose those wheels because I am fat and one day at work (lbs) a flyer came in the mail with xt hubs on sale and sun rims on sale so I said why not! They replaced the stock rims on my aurora, alex rims with Ritchey zero hubs (they really do reduce dish and make the wheel stronger), 36 spokes 3x in front 4x in back. Those wheels are just taking up space in my garage if youre interested.
I don't suppose you (still) have those wheels,huh??
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Old 02-25-11, 04:56 PM
  #27  
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I have a LHT with 26" wheels. I use Mavic XM719 rims with 36 hole XT hub in the rear, and 32 hole SON dynamo hub in the front. DT Swiss double butted spokes on both. These have about 5000 mostly commuting miles on them with no issues whatsoever.

According to Sheldon, if you have the same number of spokes front and rear, either your front wheel is overbuilt, or your rear wheel is underbuilt.

Paul
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Old 02-25-11, 06:04 PM
  #28  
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14 ga seem fine , have for 25 years , DB spokes do cost more ,
if you got the bankroll , go for it.
Bring spares .. know how to replace them , and re true and tension the wheel.

I have some sport bike wheels 36 15 gage straight , they are 30 years old,
still in true..

Builder : me

for cassette drive train and more than 36 spokes,
Shimano's tandem hubs would work, they ship as a 140 wide axle,
but you can swap parts to make it a 135.

Last edited by fietsbob; 03-13-11 at 10:55 AM.
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Old 02-25-11, 07:42 PM
  #29  
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Originally Posted by Ronno6 View Post
I don't suppose you (still) have those wheels,huh??
I don't think you'll get an answer to that 5-year-old-post.

also, his last post was oct 2010....
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Old 02-25-11, 08:04 PM
  #30  
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Yeah, I'm not holding my breath..............
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Old 03-10-11, 08:39 AM
  #31  
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A bit of good news-I discovered a 20hole Ritchey Zero System sealed bearing hub in my hub box. I can drill 20 more holes, install the 4mm shortened non-drive spacer that I'd previously had machined, use a Velocity Dyad rim, and-VOILA!! 126mm, 10 speed, 40 spoke, freehub wheel exrtoidnaire!!
Now, to remove that freehub body and set up the drill press...........
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Old 03-13-11, 06:04 AM
  #32  
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Umm, a bit of a fly has worked its way into my ointment. If I drill the second set of holes as planned, it occurred to me that the new holes will be directly opposite the OEM holes in the opposite flange. That will eliminate the stagger between the holes in the flanges. Will this present a problem? Should I orient pulling spokes directly opposite each other? Or, should they be staggered by one hole? As this is a rear wheel, the stronger tension of the drive side spokes should take precedence over the non-drive side spokes, or so I would think. The spole lengths may need to be adjusted, but probably not even a full mm.
Any thoughts from the wheelbuilders out there?
Thanks.
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Old 03-13-11, 11:03 AM
  #33  
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equidistant holes all the way around the hub, you just start from scratch with a 40 spoke rim.

chamfering the hole edges of your inner faces of the flange to bed the j of the spoke will probably have to be by hand.
like i say shimano tandem hubs can work on a single, shorten axle, to suit.
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Old 03-13-11, 12:12 PM
  #34  
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I've read that the chamfering of the holes is about the bend in the spoke rather than seating the head,but I do plan on breaking the corners inside by hand.
As for the Shimano tandem hub, I've thought about those. However, I want the narrower spaced flanges of the Ritchey Zero System hub in order to reduce dish, especially since I'm using 126mm spacing. I'm really watching out for the DT manufactured Ritchey hi-lo flanged hub due to its larger diameter flanges; however, I have no experience machining down the non-drive spacer the -4mm required to suit my needs. I'll have to play that one by ear if I ever find the hub. I've seen the 24 hole version for sale, but not any 20 holers as of late.
I didn't think the lack of radial stagger would have any negative impact.
Thanks.
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Old 03-13-11, 12:43 PM
  #35  
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I've run a Phil Wood and then a Bullseye hub , freewheel, 126 , for decades,
48 14 Ga spokes.

It's trying to pack in cogs more than 7 that forces too much dish.. IMHO
no advantage of having 8, 9 0r 10.. touring.
spread of ratios matters more. 6 or 7 , 13-34 sufficient.

easy enough to turn out axle spacers on a Lathe..
But you can just Buy them too...various thicknesses 10 mm ID.

Last edited by fietsbob; 03-13-11 at 12:46 PM.
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Old 03-13-11, 01:34 PM
  #36  
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I have rim and hub on order for my primary loaded touring wheel, which is still gonna be a Phil Wood Touring hub spaced for IRD 7 speed freewheels. This moves the hub shell 2 or 3mm to the drive side, reducing dish. This is because the IRD supposedly has a lesser stack height than other 7 speed freewheels. I dunno. I have a couple of Shimano Sante 7 speed fw's that seem to be the same height. We'll see.
Anyyway, 36 14/15/14 DB spokes 4X onto a Velocity Cliffhanger 700c rim will complete the wheel. The dish will be +/- 5mm from center. As close to dishless as I could come for a 7 speed setup. This was recommended to me by Rivendell's wheelbuilding guru Rich.
I have a vintage Specialized 126mm fw hub that has narrower flange spacing than other fw hubs I've seen, but that pesky thought of axle breakage looms large, especially as I weigh 230# without bike and/or gear. That's part of my freehub rationale. (Hopefully the PW's are as good as they say...)
But, half of the attraction of cycling for me has always been playing with equipment.
As such, my quest for the perfect 126mm 8/9/10 speed freehub wheel continues.......
As for axle spacers, the latest Ritchey hubs have sealed bearings and no threaded axle. The non-drive axle spacer is (probably) aluminum and pressed onto the steel axle. That requires machining to shorten the dropout end, as the hub end has a flange to shield the bearing. I've done this on the earlier Ritchey sealed bearing units successfully.
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Old 03-13-11, 04:02 PM
  #37  
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I don't know about the perfect wheel...probably just multiple choices depending upon the use.

I ended up using a 9speed wheel built up more for tandem specifications. Phil Wood hub, 48 spokes, velocity dyad rim build from Peter White. 700c.

I was very heavily loaded, and probably started my tour weighing 200lbs +?60lbs gear. Never had any wheel problems, including riding for extended periods on 2nd/3rd world dirt/gravel.

-Now if I had a bottomless budget I would go with 26" rims and an internal gear hub, and perhaps a trailer because I did like to carry a bunch...
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Old 03-14-11, 08:08 AM
  #38  
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I have XT hubs, Mavic 719 36-spoke rims, and double-butted spokes. I've taken three tours without breaking a spoke, and I'm a pretty big guy. I built mine myself using Sheldon Brown's instructions. I bought some nice tools as part of the process, including a Park truing stand and a tensionmeter. I like having my own tools!

I'm presently building a "touring 29er" for the Great Divide route. I've bought XT hubs. I'm going to go with Mavic 719's again. I'm looking into the triple-butted spokes Stuart mentioned. The rear hub looks like there isn't much offset on the drive side. Is it worse because of the discs? I'm a little nervous.
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Old 03-14-11, 08:44 AM
  #39  
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Originally Posted by BigBlueToe View Post
I have XT hubs, Mavic 719 36-spoke rims, and double-butted spokes. I've taken three tours without breaking a spoke, and I'm a pretty big guy. I built mine myself using Sheldon Brown's instructions. I bought some nice tools as part of the process, including a Park truing stand and a tensionmeter. I like having my own tools!

I'm presently building a "touring 29er" for the Great Divide route. I've bought XT hubs. I'm going to go with Mavic 719's again. I'm looking into the triple-butted spokes Stuart mentioned. The rear hub looks like there isn't much offset on the drive side. Is it worse because of the discs? I'm a little nervous.
Yes, with 135 mm dropouts, you'll have still have a dished wheel. Here are two sources of silver Alpine III's:

http://www.precisiontandems.com/catframepart.htm
http://www.sjscycles.co.uk/13-16-14g...of-6-prod1694/

For the GDMBR I chose the wider Sun Rhyno Lites and the White Industries M16 hub because of the consumer replaceable (with an Allen wrench) sealed cartridge bearings. I also have Alpine III's on this wheel.
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Old 03-14-11, 10:30 PM
  #40  
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On butted spokes. Most experts agree that they are better. The issue is whether you will end up with a wheel that fails if you don't use them, and for the most part that is a myth. Well made straight spoke wheels will take incredible abuse and some tourists even prefer them. If the best argument one can come up with is that butted spokes may absorb the shock of severe loads, that isn't really saying much. How often do you expect that a single spoke takes all the load.

The way I look at it is this. If you get a chance to get well made wheel with straight gauge spokes at the right price etc... Don't hesitate. If you are making a custom wheel use butted spokes, they are not all that much more expensive when you are buying single spokes by a top brand like Wheelsmith, and then you have the confidence of knowing you are riding the best, whether it will ever make a difference or not.
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Old 03-15-11, 05:19 AM
  #41  
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Originally Posted by Peterpan1 View Post
On butted spokes. Most experts agree that they are better. The issue is whether you will end up with a wheel that fails if you don't use them, and for the most part that is a myth. Well made straight spoke wheels will take incredible abuse and some tourists even prefer them. If the best argument one can come up with is that butted spokes may absorb the shock of severe loads, that isn't really saying much. How often do you expect that a single spoke takes all the load.

The way I look at it is this. If you get a chance to get well made wheel with straight gauge spokes at the right price etc... Don't hesitate. If you are making a custom wheel use butted spokes, they are not all that much more expensive when you are buying single spokes by a top brand like Wheelsmith, and then you have the confidence of knowing you are riding the best, whether it will ever make a difference or not.
I totally agree. I have never broken a straight gauge spoke. Ever. The only reason I went butted was because so many people are adamant about their superiority. The cost penalty was only about 50 cents a spoke, increasing the cost of my (rear) wheel about 5%. I did refrain, from going to more than 36 spokes, however. (36 spokes w/ 250lb rider + bike+ gear).

You never know when you'll have take that one hit that would have broken a "lesser" spoke.
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Old 03-15-11, 06:57 AM
  #42  
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I had some 36 H Velocity Dyad rims built with Ultegra hubs for my commuter/touring bike for about $350. They have held up well so far (2600 miles commuting) and are lighter than most other options for touring wheels. Weight was an important issue for me because the roads are hilly where I live.
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Old 03-15-11, 05:24 PM
  #43  
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When I drill the extra 20 holes in the Ritchey Zero hub I'll lace it to a 40 spoke Dyad. Hopefully that will fill the bill for the freehub style. Time'll tell (along with a few thousand miles...)
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Old 03-31-11, 11:20 AM
  #44  
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The proprietor of the LBS told me that a 32 spoke touring wheel should be fine for my 230# body + 25# boke + 50# (?) gear, as he bases his theory on the abuse he heaps on his 32 spoke mountain bike wheels. I'm not too sure.
I have purchased a new 32 Bontrager Fairlane rim that I'm going to lace to a 32 Ritchey Zero hub spaced for 126mm. This should render a totally symmetrical spoke configuration with the rim's 4mm offset. DB stainless spokes, but can only go 3X as the rule of the 9's indicate.
So, my hopes that a symmetrical wheel will render the radial strength to hold up. Once again, another opinion leads to more testing.....
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Old 03-31-11, 12:25 PM
  #45  
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I have been on this soap-box before but since you asked...

My expedition grade (Arvon-built) bike has 26", 48 spoked Rhyno Lite rims with PW hubs. They are 4X laced with 14 ga. spokes. Solid, and heavy. They are/were pretty well indestructable.

My Shimano RD lost a screw and the RD went into the rear wheel one night. I couldn't pedal any further and the next morning hitch hiked 700 km to Katherine NT (Australia) and the LBS there use my spare spokes to "fix" the wheel. There was hardly any wobble when the spokes were broken, but the RD was replaced. He said the wheel was in great shape, but it was hard to replace the spokes because of the 4X lacing...

Later on the Roper River road I was going along and all of a sudden the front wheel went almost 90 degrees to my motion because of a hidden rock in the bull dust. I fell down, but the front wheel was OK. No buckling... 48 spokes held it together - I think.

Enough said. Get the most spokes you can and don't worry about the extra $$ you spent. You will reap beneits in longevity and "security"....

I am now planning a lighter "folder" with a mini-velo design with 20" wheels and a 36 spoke Rohloff rear hub, but built for sustained touring. It will fit into one bag for easier air travel. Not better, just a differnt type of touring.
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Old 03-31-11, 04:27 PM
  #46  
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"The cost penalty was only about 50 cents a spoke, increasing the cost of my (rear) wheel about 5%. I did refrain, from going to more than 36 spokes, however. (36 spokes w/ 250lb rider + bike+ gear)."

I did the same thing. People act like buying straight spokes is some huge cheapout, when the price is pretty much the same. Certainly nothing that would change what I did.

"You never know when you'll have take that one hit that would have broken a "lesser" spoke."

It is mostly the rim you really have to worry about particularly these days. Quality of spokes is way up, quality of rims is down, at least for our stuff. It occurs to me that one guy, Beckmann who recommends straight spokes and claims huge experience, is a multi spoke plus guy. You go 48 spokes you are less loaded per spoke. On the one hand you have less load, on the other hand there is less give, the point comes when you aren't going to deflect the tapered bit because it is as stiff per load as the straight gauge would be at lessor numbers. But he has broken butted spokes to handling, baggage hooks, sticks, etc... So his overall recommendation is for straight gauge for 40 or 48.
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Old 03-31-11, 04:34 PM
  #47  
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"The proprietor of the LBS told me that a 32 spoke touring wheel should be fine for my 230# body + 25# boke + 50# (?) gear, as he bases his theory on the abuse he heaps on his 32 spoke mountain bike wheels. I'm not too sure."

That's bad advice, not to say you will have problems. Impact loads are completely different from fatigue situations. Also depends what rim size he is basing it on. 32 on 26" is 36 on 700c, 29er, 27". The real clincher is where is the upside? Usually the wheel weight is actually heavier as you go down in spoke numbers because the rim gets heavier for the same strength. But people have built 20 spoke wheels and toured extensively on them, but it doesn't make it the best choice.
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Old 03-31-11, 04:50 PM
  #48  
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Originally Posted by metal_cowboy View Post
I am running a pair of shimano LX hubs laced to Mavic A719 rims (36 spoke) that I bought from performance bike. They are good wheels that were around $200 on sale about a year ago. My next set of wheels will be custom built by Peter White. I am thinking about Phil Wood hubs and Mavic A719 rims. I am going to go with 40 in the rear, and 36 up front. Some may say that a 40 spoke wheel is overkill and the rotational weight is greater..blah, blah blah: the extra 4 spokes weigh no more than a couple of bites of a Power Bar; the addtional strenght is well worth it.



This is a good set of wheels that are being sold on Ebay.
http://cgi.ebay.com/New-Hand-Built-X...QQcmdZViewItem
Just because Peter White builds you wheels doesn't mean that you may or may not have issues... I had a wheel built by Peter White that has been nothing special including the spokes I've managed to break. Now realize that I'm about 160 lbs and running maybe 40lbs of luggage. The wheels are Velocity Dyads with XT Hubs and Wheelsmith Double Butted spokes. I have yet to find a wheel I can't break though so YMMV. Doesn't matter if it's my touring bike or my race bike..... If i can't break it I'm not putting out enough watts.
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Old 03-31-11, 10:28 PM
  #49  
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Too true, you have to want the wheel to survive, and there are doubtless ways to beat nearly any wheel up. I try to be kind to my wheels, but I know there are some people who don't want to do anything to reduce the wear. It is part of the fun.
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Old 04-01-11, 06:20 AM
  #50  
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Peterpan1 Writes: "The real clincher is where is the upside?"

For various reasons I am still trying to build a reliable touring wheel based on a 8-10 speed freehub for 126mm OLN setup.
I am building an "Old Reliable" wheelset using 36 spoke PW hubs and Velocity Cliffhanger 700C rims, but still want to build the aforementioned freehub setup.
As I am building 2 or 3 touring bikes, I have need for multiple wheelsets anyway, and I have always been fascinated with equipment (especially doing things that are not common.) I'm just odd that way.

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