Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Touring
Reload this Page >

Who has ridden Cambodia?

Touring Have a dream to ride a bike across your state, across the country, or around the world? Self-contained or fully supported? Trade ideas, adventures, and more in our bicycle touring forum.

Who has ridden Cambodia?

Old 02-07-19, 10:55 AM
  #1  
3speed
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Madison, WI
Posts: 3,346
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 310 Post(s)
Liked 3 Times in 2 Posts
Who has ridden Cambodia?

I'm building a 26" wheeled bike for daily travel in Cambodia(plan to live there for a bit). I'll be in the Siem Reap area in particular. How are the roads out there? Do I need kind of aggressive tread, or will a Schwalbe Supreme do? Will I be fine with a 35mm tire, or would a 50mm be much better? I plan to take the bike on other tours while I'm on that side of the world, so would rather not just use a large, heavy tire if it's not needed.
3speed is offline  
Old 02-07-19, 11:17 AM
  #2  
avole
Banned.
 
Join Date: Dec 2017
Location: France
Posts: 1,043

Bikes: Brompton, Time, Bianchi, Jan Janssen, Peugeot

Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 598 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
I have. Many of the roads are made, particularly around Siem Reap and down Tonle Sap towards Phnom Penh. I was using Schwalbe Marathons on my Brompton, and didn't have a problem. Took a spare tyre too, which wasn't needed. Some of the outlying roads my be dirt, but again the quality is pretty good.Don't know the supremes, but the Marathons were more than up to the task. Take a sturdy lock, whatever you do. If nothing else, you'll feel more secure when you leave the bike. I wasn't so much worried about the locals, by the way, as the tourists who only stay one or more days! I used 35mm tyres, which are the standard for Bromptons, last time, without a problem.
avole is offline  
Old 02-07-19, 12:22 PM
  #3  
saddlesores
Senior Member
 
saddlesores's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Bangkok...and....Hainan
Posts: 2,970

Bikes: inferior steel....and....noodly aluminium

Mentioned: 22 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 698 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
think i've done almost all the major roads in cambodia with 26*1.95's, half before they were paved. you could probably get by with 38's nowadays unless leaving the main routes.


chinese have been paving just about everything, but quality varies. i suspect they subcontract out by kilometer sections to whoever's uncle's cousin depending on brown envelope requirements. leads to poor quality work and cutting of the corners. road surfaces don't last long because of that and the perpetually ueber-overloaded vehicles.


you wind up with alternating sections of smooth pavement, potholes, dirt, pavement..... conditions change quickly, road reports from last year no longer valid.
saddlesores is offline  
Old 02-08-19, 08:50 AM
  #4  
bwilli88 
Senior Member
 
bwilli88's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Kampong Cham, Cambodia but I have quite a few in Lancaster, PA
Posts: 1,766

Bikes: Bikes in USA; 73 Raleigh Supercourse dingle speed, 74 Raleigh Grand Prix SS, 78 Raleigh Supercourse, 83 Centurion Pro-Tour, 82 Raleigh RRA.

Mentioned: 38 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 417 Post(s)
Liked 5 Times in 5 Posts
A little bit more info would be nice. Many 27.5 bikes and a few 700c/29rs. What frame, wheels, drops or flat bars.?

I prefer 700c marathons and live in Kampong Cham.
bwilli88 is online now  
Old 02-08-19, 12:33 PM
  #5  
3speed
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Madison, WI
Posts: 3,346
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 310 Post(s)
Liked 3 Times in 2 Posts
As mentioned, 26Ē. The frame is an 80ís mtb frame I got from CL(83 Diamond Back Ridge Runner). Iím gonna try it with drops to begin with. If that stretches me out too much then Iíll try it with flats.
3speed is offline  
Old 02-09-19, 02:42 AM
  #6  
avole
Banned.
 
Join Date: Dec 2017
Location: France
Posts: 1,043

Bikes: Brompton, Time, Bianchi, Jan Janssen, Peugeot

Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 598 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Flats might be better to begin with. I've done Bali and parts of Malaysia on drops, which fine but never toook the lower position, mostly because I needed to see the unexpected, apart from other motorists. Nothing like rounding a corner to see a family of apes heading towards you the other side, or, in Australia, a wild boar come crashing across the road in front of you.

The biggest problem had in Cambodia on the most recent trip was being too ambitious about distance at the start, and finding the heat got a little too much close to mid-day. when I still had a fair way to go. I should have know better, of course. The other was English - not much spoken the further you are away from Siem Reap or Phnom Penh, and that includes the hotels.
avole is offline  
Old 02-09-19, 06:12 PM
  #7  
3speed
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Madison, WI
Posts: 3,346
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 310 Post(s)
Liked 3 Times in 2 Posts
I practically Never ride drops anyway. I find the standard brake lever hand position and slightly more aero position preferable to flats, though. I might end up swapping it to flats once I'm there and just riding daily, but I want to fly out of the country with drops on it so that I'll be set up for touring in Europe too. I'm sure swapping to flats once I'm in Cambodia won't be too big of a deal if need be.

I have been thinking about trying bull-horns lately, though...
3speed is offline  
Old 02-11-19, 07:35 PM
  #8  
bwilli88 
Senior Member
 
bwilli88's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Kampong Cham, Cambodia but I have quite a few in Lancaster, PA
Posts: 1,766

Bikes: Bikes in USA; 73 Raleigh Supercourse dingle speed, 74 Raleigh Grand Prix SS, 78 Raleigh Supercourse, 83 Centurion Pro-Tour, 82 Raleigh RRA.

Mentioned: 38 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 417 Post(s)
Liked 5 Times in 5 Posts
In and around Siem reap I see mostly mountain bikes. Even the road bikes have flat bars. Where I live in Kampong Cham I am starting to see some drop bar bikes but mostly with mtb style thumbies and cross style brake levers. If you plan to swap bars styles bring everything you need to do the swap. Bikes shops here in Siem reap are mostly rental or old style step thru sales.
bwilli88 is online now  
Old 02-12-19, 01:44 PM
  #9  
fietsbob 
coprolite
 
fietsbob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: NW,Oregon Coast
Posts: 41,650

Bikes: 8

Mentioned: 188 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6836 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 215 Times in 179 Posts
Asked this question any where else, other than this forum?


I tour with extra tires (at least 1). a stiff steel bead tire can lay across my back panniers by bringing the beads to a near figure 8

so it curved .. then my sleeping bag in top of it..
fietsbob is offline  
Old 02-13-19, 07:06 PM
  #10  
3speed
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Madison, WI
Posts: 3,346
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 310 Post(s)
Liked 3 Times in 2 Posts
Originally Posted by bwilli88 View Post
In and around Siem reap I see mostly mountain bikes. Even the road bikes have flat bars. Where I live in Kampong Cham I am starting to see some drop bar bikes but mostly with mtb style thumbies and cross style brake levers. If you plan to swap bars styles bring everything you need to do the swap. Bikes shops here in Siem reap are mostly rental or old style step thru sales.
Hmm... I wonder if I could fit MTB trigger shifters on bull-horn bars. I have a spare set of 3x9 Deore shifters and derailers. You might have just given me a new bar set-up. Thanks.
3speed is offline  
Old 02-14-19, 04:00 AM
  #11  
avole
Banned.
 
Join Date: Dec 2017
Location: France
Posts: 1,043

Bikes: Brompton, Time, Bianchi, Jan Janssen, Peugeot

Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 598 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Just a couple of thoughts: the worst surface I came across was that going from Angkor Wat to Angkor Thom, which isn't far. It was a newly laid surface, and shook the hell out of my Brompton, but, other than that, most most road surfaces passable, particularly the main ones.

Now the Brompton is a folder. A major plus is that, if you get tired, hot, behind schedule or whatever, and want to take a bus or taxi, a folding bike the size of a Brompton will produce smiles, rather than the shake of the head. Most, if not all, hotels let you store bikes in your room, especially the smaller ones.
avole is offline  
Related Topics
Thread
Thread Starter
Forum
Replies
Last Post
AZORCH
Classic & Vintage
5
11-14-17 12:59 AM
gbiker
Road Cycling
6
08-31-10 07:50 PM
mosscoveredhat
Track Cycling: Velodrome Racing and Training Area
1
08-27-06 10:33 PM
The Tortoise
Mountain Bike Racing
16
03-30-06 06:45 AM

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

Copyright © 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.