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What do I wear?

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What do I wear?

Old 07-20-19, 12:11 PM
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Velocity’s optimal suggested tire size chart shows 28 - 38mm for aeroheat. I’m using them with 32 and 40mm tires on two bikes. No problems. In the past, they have warned against larger tires.
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Old 07-20-19, 01:51 PM
  #27  
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Originally Posted by Steamer View Post
The inner width is small enough to use 28mm tires I think, which is about the smallest 559 tire out there anyway.
Nope, you can get 559 at least down to 1".
https://www.amazon.com/Primo-Racer-T.../dp/B0063R20S4
Not that I recommend it; the 1" size gives a rough ride and isn't any faster than the wider tires.
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Old 07-20-19, 03:43 PM
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I just ordered a set of the Michelin Wild Run'R 1.1", Ultegra 6800 32h hubs, Mavic XM 117 rims, and DT Swiss Champion spokes. As if buying used bikes I don't really need wasn't a big enough problem already.
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Old 07-20-19, 06:37 PM
  #29  
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I do remember you on this forum, Kingston. Good to see you finally picked one up, and wow, deal of the day. I wouldn't have hesitated either.

As far as speed of my DF vs my first day on the bent, I was 2mph slower, with very sore legs after my first few rides on the bent. I think it took me about 300-400 miles for my speeds to be equal between my Baron Lowracer and my DF, and then about 750 till I felt completely at ease....and 2mph faster than my DF.
As you get develop your bent legs, you'll find those low gears to be too low. But it never hurts to have them on longer climbs. I run a 34/34 as my lowest gearing. Great for SE Michigan. But there are times when I had even something lower, like a 30/36 front/rear.
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Old 07-22-19, 01:44 PM
  #30  
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85'/mile is 1.6% grade, not exactly a hill. A hill would be >200'/mile. Illinois around Chicago is pretty flat but not so much that
a 1.6% grade would be remarkable. If you are a spinner, the 36t cassette and 30t CW should be enough for 10% grades out to a
mile or so in length and shorter 15% grades of perhaps a few hundred yards. I find steering to be a problem below 4 mph.
100 rpm cadence in the gear you listed is about 6 mph.
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Old 07-22-19, 05:18 PM
  #31  
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With regards to what to wear, I agree with others who recommend your regular kit. Proper cycling shorts won't chafe and they also provide good support which will make those legs feel much better when you've ridden far.

As far as water goes, Baccetta's Brain Box is a good way to go. Just toss a bladder in there and it will hold your other stuff too. Be sure to clip the tube to your jersey. Otherwise, if your tube gets into your spokes and the bite valve gets knocked off, it could drain all your water without you being aware. Don't ask how I know this....
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Old 07-22-19, 06:30 PM
  #32  
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Originally Posted by sch View Post
85'/mile is 1.6% grade, not exactly a hill. A hill would be >200'/mile. Illinois around Chicago is pretty flat but not so much that
a 1.6% grade would be remarkable. If you are a spinner, the 36t cassette and 30t CW should be enough for 10% grades out to a
mile or so in length and shorter 15% grades of perhaps a few hundred yards. I find steering to be a problem below 4 mph.
100 rpm cadence in the gear you listed is about 6 mph.
Um, that figure of climbing per mile is averaged over the whole distance, including downhills and flat-ish sections.
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Old 07-22-19, 07:51 PM
  #33  
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After spending a good chunk of the day Saturday fiddling around with tires and wheels, and online shopping for replacements, I was able to get out for a 55 mile ride on Sunday. I was hoping to get a longer ride in, but my wife asked me not to go out if there was lightening, so I waited for that to clear before I went out, which only left time for 55 miles before I had to be home for some other family commitments.

While I took the wobble out of the front wheel on Saturday, I made the flat spot more noticeable so that was annoying. After work today took the flat spot out, but now the wobble is back. I can't seem to eliminate both. The front rim is toast, so I'll be happy when I get my new 559 tires and even happier when I get my new wheels built. Other than that, the ride was great. I wore a running t-shirt and some lightweight mountain bike shorts with a mesh liner that has a thin chamois and liked that setup a lot better than when I wore my usual cycling kit. I like the idea of the jammer trunks, so I'll try that sometime too.

I put the Iris cages on before my ride. They are much more secure than the blackburn cages I used for the first ride. Great recommendation. I ordered some Lezyne Flow side loaders so I'll see how they work when they arrive. My guess is that they'll be a little easier to access, but a little less secure. Always trade-offs. I'll keep the king cage for the third bottle out front.

I have a bunch of 9-speed cassettes so I ran a 12-23, which is great for the flat terrain around my house. Normally I gear for the steepest/biggest hill of the ride not the total elevation. This ride I'm doing in a couple weeks has 5,918 feet of climbing in 247 miles. At only 24'/mile it's not a very hilly ride, but there a few bigish hills at around 4%, which I have done many times with a 32" low gear on a DF, so I'm thinking I'll run an 11-32 cassette which will give me a low of 23" just in case I need it. Better to run a little wide and not need the low gears than too narrow and have to get off and walk. Based on what you guys are saying, it doesn't sound like I'll need a 36 on the back, and I could probably get by with a 28. I have noticed that if I push my shoulders into the seat-back I can put a lot of power into the pedals. Not quite like getting out of the saddle on a DF, but different than just spinning.

Planning to get another laid-back ride in before work tomorrow morning. Thanks for all the tips and suggestions. Super helpful in getting this bike dialed in.
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Old 07-23-19, 11:25 AM
  #34  
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Went out for a 36 mile ride this morning. Still slow, but my legs didn't hurt as much when I was done, so that seems like progress.

I realized today that turning is 100% with the handlebars, which then leans the bike into the turn. Kind of like riding a big motorcycle. I get the best straight line tracking and turns when I keep my upper body still and point the bike where I want to go with my hands. Leaning to steer like I would with a DF is counterproductive and makes the bike squirrelly, so I stopped doing that. I think that's why turns feel so different. Instead of leaning to initiate the turn, I turn to initiate the lean which is a completely different feeling. This has also helped a lot with starting. I keep my upper body really rigid, then get a good revolution in a middle gear, clip in the other foot and I'm off in a straight line. I was wobbling all over the place before I figured out this technique. Of course this requires remembering to gear down before the stop.

Also wanted to share my headlight setup which is working very well well. I found a seatpost reflector bracket, bolted it to the frame, then attached the plastic part of a fork crown mount for a B&M Ixon Premium which is my favorite battery powered light.

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Old 07-23-19, 01:14 PM
  #35  
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Originally Posted by kingston View Post
Went out for a 36 mile ride this morning. Still slow, but my legs didn't hurt as much when I was done, so that seems like progress.

I realized today that turning is 100% with the handlebars, which then leans the bike into the turn. Kind of like riding a big motorcycle. I get the best straight line tracking and turns when I keep my upper body still and point the bike where I want to go with my hands. Leaning to steer like I would with a DF is counterproductive and makes the bike squirrelly, so I stopped doing that. I think that's why turns feel so different. Instead of leaning to initiate the turn, I turn to initiate the lean which is a completely different feeling. This has also helped a lot with starting. I keep my upper body really rigid, then get a good revolution in a middle gear, clip in the other foot and I'm off in a straight line. I was wobbling all over the place before I figured out this technique. Of course this requires remembering to gear down before the stop.

Also wanted to share my headlight setup which is working very well well. I found a seatpost reflector bracket, bolted it to the frame, then attached the plastic part of a fork crown mount for a B&M Ixon Premium which is my favorite battery powered light.

Most people experience the same phenomenon WRT turns / cornering. You steer moreso than on a DF. As you noted trying to lean or use body english is essentially unproductive and distracting. Not sure why it's the case, but as you've figured out there any number of mental adjustments that come with riding a bent well.

Also, you may experience "foot flash" with that setup (light reflecting back at you off your shoes - yes, it happens even with black shoes), and find it messes up your night vision. I do, and most other folks do.

If you experience it too, this is a good solution: https://www.bacchettabikes.com/produ...-armed-bandit/
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Old 07-23-19, 01:29 PM
  #36  
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Shirt and shoes are required, for service... pants are... optional (?)
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Old 07-23-19, 01:38 PM
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Originally Posted by Steamer View Post
Also, you may experience "foot flash" with that setup (light reflecting back at you off your shoes - yes, it happens even with black shoes), and find it messes up your night vision. I do, and most other folks do.../
I rode for about an hour in the dark this morning and didn't notice any foot flash. The front of the light extends to about the end of the big-ring so maybe that's just enough to clear the flash zone. I'm sure now that you've mentioned it, it will drive me nuts, and I'll have to get the one-armed bandit.
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Old 07-24-19, 06:09 PM
  #38  
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Originally Posted by Steamer View Post
Blousy shorts will catch a lot of wind and can direct bees up to places no bee should ever go. So some kind of short that is tight fitting, at least at the bottom, is best.
I wish someone had told me about this before I found out the hard way.
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Old 07-25-19, 10:25 AM
  #39  
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Took the Strada out for a 47 mile ride this morning, and now have 185 miles on the bike. While I'm getting PR's on a bunch of downhill segments, my legs are still holding me back. Sounds like I need a few hundred more miles to get past that, which I should be able to get in the next couple of weeks. I have really enjoyed my rides so far and feel like I lucked into a bike that may be exactly what I would have chosen for myself if I had taken the time to pick out my own recumbent. It's nice when the universe deals you a good hand. My 559x1.1 tires arrive today, which I can install on my existing 26" wheelset, so I can ditch the 650c's with the mangled front rim. It will be interesting to see how different 559x28 feels from 571x23, and to see if there is any room for something wider on the smaller rims. My new wheel parts should arrive sometime next week, so if the stars align, I could have new wheels for my 400k on 8/3, which would be awesome, although no big deal if not.

The Strada is very well suited for my type of long-distance solo rides, so I can definitely see myself adding this bike to the regular rotation. Although I don't see myself bringing the Strada to brevets if there's a chance I'll be riding with other people on DFs. I like riding with a group on brevets when there are other rides at approximately my same level of fitness, and that will work better for me on a DF, which got me thinking. If I spend a lot of time getting my recumbent legs, will that ruin my DF legs? I'm not so much worried about it for this season, as August is always my last big mileage month, and my fitness is pretty good right now, but it may influence how I build up my speed and endurance next spring.

The light is fine, by the way. There's a little bit of illumination on the side of my shoes, but the light is forward enough that it does't illuminate the tops to create the flash.
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Old 07-25-19, 12:34 PM
  #40  
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Originally Posted by kingston View Post
Took the Strada out for a 47 mile ride this morning, and now have 185 miles on the bike. While I'm getting PR's on a bunch of downhill segments, my legs are still holding me back. Sounds like I need a few hundred more miles to get past that, which I should be able to get in the next couple of weeks. I have really enjoyed my rides so far and feel like I lucked into a bike that may be exactly what I would have chosen for myself if I had taken the time to pick out my own recumbent. It's nice when the universe deals you a good hand. My 559x1.1 tires arrive today, which I can install on my existing 26" wheelset, so I can ditch the 650c's with the mangled front rim. It will be interesting to see how different 559x28 feels from 571x23, and to see if there is any room for something wider on the smaller rims. My new wheel parts should arrive sometime next week, so if the stars align, I could have new wheels for my 400k on 8/3, which would be awesome, although no big deal if not.

The Strada is very well suited for my type of long-distance solo rides, so I can definitely see myself adding this bike to the regular rotation. Although I don't see myself bringing the Strada to brevets if there's a chance I'll be riding with other people on DFs. I like riding with a group on brevets when there are other rides at approximately my same level of fitness, and that will work better for me on a DF, which got me thinking. If I spend a lot of time getting my recumbent legs, will that ruin my DF legs? I'm not so much worried about it for this season, as August is always my last big mileage month, and my fitness is pretty good right now, but it may influence how I build up my speed and endurance next spring.

The light is fine, by the way. There's a little bit of illumination on the side of my shoes, but the light is forward enough that it does't illuminate the tops to create the flash.
I don't find that bent riding ruins my DF legs, or vice versa. I actually think recumbent legs is more of a neurological / technique issue, and not so much a muscle thing. It IS a muscle thing for the first several hundred miles, or perhaps the first 500 miles, but your muscles adapt pretty quickly. Its the brain that takes longer. Effective bent riding actually requires a little different pedaling technique, and it takes a while to get your spin equal to what it is on your DF.

What bent riding does do is wreck your DF butt. You may not have realized how much your tissues have adapted to a DF saddle, and if you don't stay in contact with the DF enough, you will soften up.

I think you will find that if the route isn't too hilly, you can ride with DFs just fine on the Bacchetta.

At this point, the only advantage of the one arm bandit is that it could allow the mounting of a backup light (unless your backup light uses the same bracket as your primary light, that is).
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Old 07-25-19, 02:17 PM
  #41  
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Really appreciate you answering all my questions. Good to hear about the legs.

Originally Posted by Steamer View Post
I don't find that bent riding ruins my DF legs, or vice versa. I actually think recumbent legs is more of a neurological / technique issue, and not so much a muscle thing. It IS a muscle thing for the first several hundred miles, or perhaps the first 500 miles, but your muscles adapt pretty quickly. Its the brain that takes longer. Effective bent riding actually requires a little different pedaling technique, and it takes a while to get your spin equal to what it is on your DF.

What bent riding does do is wreck your DF butt. You may not have realized how much your tissues have adapted to a DF saddle, and if you don't stay in contact with the DF enough, you will soften up.
Great point. I literally have calluses on my butt and have actually noticed that they are starting to soften up just in the last two weeks since I got this bike and have been riding it exclusively. I'm sure the same is happening to the soft tissue.

Originally Posted by Steamer View Post
I think you will find that if the route isn't too hilly, you can ride with DFs just fine on the Bacchetta.
It's just fun riding in a group of DFs. Taking pulls, rotating through the paceline, etc., I'm used to doing that on a DF and don't think it would be as natural or as much fun for me on a recumbent. My buddy who rides a Bacchetta, rides with me a lot, but he's always off to the side or hanging off the back, so he's with the group, but not as much part of the group, if you know what I mean.

Originally Posted by Steamer View Post
At this point, the only advantage of the one arm bandit is that it could allow the mounting of a backup light (unless your backup light uses the same bracket as your primary light, that is).
My backup light is another Ixon that I keep in my bag, so same mount. I also carry a backup to the backup which is just a little tiny handlebar light, but I've never even had to use the backup.
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Old 07-25-19, 05:20 PM
  #42  
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I've got the wheels swapped with the new tires and the side-loading cages mounted. We'll see how it rides in the morning.

The rear brakes don't quite reach far enough down. They don't rub on the tire, but I can't get them down to the middle of the rim either. Any ideas? Front brakes work fine.
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Old 07-25-19, 09:00 PM
  #43  
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You may need a rear brake with longer reach. My V3 frame was being set up for use with 650c wheels and the rear brake wouldn't reach far enough for the 559 wheels I use. Switching to a Tekro dual pivot R539 fixed that.
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Old 07-26-19, 04:48 AM
  #44  
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Originally Posted by JanMM View Post
You may need a rear brake with longer reach. My V3 frame was being set up for use with 650c wheels and the rear brake wouldn't reach far enough for the 559 wheels I use. Switching to a Tekro dual pivot R539 fixed that.
Thanks, I just ordered one.
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Old 07-26-19, 09:51 AM
  #45  
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Originally Posted by kingston View Post
Thanks, I just ordered one.
The Tektro R539 has a max reach of 57mm.

I *thought* the standard Bacchetta road brakes (https://www.bacchettabikes.com/produ...ta-rear-brake/) had a 57mm reach as well. IF that's true then the Tektro R539 won't help you.

You'd have to use some oddball brake pad holders - https://www.bdopcycling.com/BDop%20Offset%20Holders.asp

OR get a very long reach brake (73mm) like the Tektro R559 - https://www.harriscyclery.net/produc...d-nut-2394.htm
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Old 07-26-19, 10:47 AM
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Originally Posted by Steamer View Post
The Tektro R539 has a max reach of 57mm.

I *thought* the standard Bacchetta road brakes (https://www.bacchettabikes.com/produ...ta-rear-brake/) had a 57mm reach as well. IF that's true then the Tektro R539 won't help you.

You'd have to use some oddball brake pad holders - https://www.bdopcycling.com/BDop%20Offset%20Holders.asp

OR get a very long reach brake (73mm) like the Tektro R559 - https://www.harriscyclery.net/produc...d-nut-2394.htm
I have a set of 559's on another bike, and they seem too long based on my measurements. Probably should have pulled the caliper and checked before I ordered the 539, but it's too late now, so I'll keep my fingers crossed. The Bacchetta rear brake actually measures out at around 57mm, but the angle coming off the nut is more extreme than the 559 caliper, which I assume is the same as the 539. The Bacchetta caliper "works" it's just closer to the tire than I prefer so I only need 2-3mm more. We'll see next week.
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Old 07-26-19, 12:04 PM
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Hmmm. 559's fit at the short end of the adjustment. I sent a request to cancel the 539 order. If the request goes through I'll get another 559 caliper. Otherwise I'll hope for the best with the 539.

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Old 07-26-19, 12:57 PM
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Does this little in-line barrel adjuster on the rear brake line do anything I should know about before I remove it? Seems to be just a failure point to kink the inner cable as far as I can tell.
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Old 07-26-19, 02:30 PM
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I got these Tactical Molle Pouches for five bucks with a coupon from aliexpres to get a bit more storage space before I get a Brain Box. Enough space for my rain-gear, arm/leg warmers and a wind vest, so not too bad.
We'll see about how durable they are, but they seem to attach very securely to the straps on the side of the OFA bag.
Usually it takes a month for stuff to get here from China. Got these in a week so don't know what's up with that.
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Old 07-26-19, 04:02 PM
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Those bags are nice, but my OCD says they will catch too much wind.

What did you think of the tires?

That flex noodle doesn't seem necessary, although sometimes those are useful on front brakes on bents.
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