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1973 Italvega Super Light with Drillium Campy Record...

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1973 Italvega Super Light with Drillium Campy Record...

Old 01-20-21, 10:13 AM
  #1  
niswanger
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1973 Italvega Super Light with Drillium Campy Record...

Hi folks,

Pretty sure what I have here in mind to purchase locally is a 58cm 73' Italvega Super Light just like this one: https://www.speedbicycles.ch/velo/44...4jOza9vtmyvz-Y

What I need help with is what to look for when going to see it, what to expect in regards to finding replacement parts, tools, BB maintenance, need bearings/races/cups/etc.. I'd like to find a desirable older Columbus Steel frame road bike with Campy Record that I can ride from time to time and enjoy but keep as a close reminder of the late 70's cycling era. Seller is asking $600 USD.

Here are the images the seller has provided:















Thank you,
Roy
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Old 01-20-21, 10:45 AM
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I am not familiar enough with the brand to give you a valuation others will chime in, but will comment on the condition and service.
The bike seems to need a complete service as well as consumables (chain, cables etc etc.) The paint needs a good cleaning and I am not sure that a good polish will remove the rust in an appreciable way.....if you like patina it is a great starting point, if not and you want it to look like the picture it will be a costly undertaking.
In terms of the service and tools if you are capable to do the work yourself the tools will not set you back much, however, if you need to have a shop do all of the work figure 100.00 to 200.00 labor to clean and service less the parts needed.
In this condition is it worth 900 to 1100.00 to you?
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Old 01-20-21, 10:54 AM
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I think the price is a little high at $600 but this is not a crazy price. Complete campy equipped bikes tend to run $500 on up. A lot depends on the condition of the bike and how desireable the frame is. This is a good columbus frame but Italvega is not as desireable as many other brands. This is no knock on the bike. It's a fine bike. It's just something that you should factor into the price. That said, vintage bikes in solid shape don't show up everyday. If you like it, this price is OK. It will clean up well.
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Old 01-20-21, 12:06 PM
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I'd seriously consider that bike at that price. Do the tubulars hold air? You'll have to factor in the cost of a decent set of tires for it, too. Maybe use that point as bargaining leverage on the price?
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Old 01-20-21, 12:13 PM
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Originally Posted by Phil_gretz View Post
I'd seriously consider that bike at that price. Do the tubulars hold air? You'll have to factor in the cost of a decent set of tires for it, too. Maybe use that point as bargaining leverage on the price?
A bit embarrassed here, but what do you mean exactly? Are these wheels some special size/make? By tubular I always thought standard inner-tube and tire setup? I think these are Nisi 700c Tubular so would a std 700c x 18-25 tube and say 700c X 25c tire not work?
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Old 01-20-21, 12:16 PM
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If it’s straight and rides well, I’d jump on it.
Last one of those I saw went for about that price at auction and that was several years ago.
If I recall correctly there was a lot of chatter about it on Classic Rendezvous before the auction.
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Old 01-20-21, 12:21 PM
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Originally Posted by niswanger View Post
A bit embarrassed here, but what do you mean exactly? Are these wheels some special size/make? By tubular I always thought standard inner-tube and tire setup? I think these are Nisi 700c Tubular so would a std 700c x 18-25 tube and say 700c X 25c tire not work?
Tubular tires have a tube sewn into the tire and the tire is glued/taped to the rim. They ride wonderfully but are rare and can be expensive anymore, they're disadvantage is if you get a puncture you need to replace the whole tire (you carry them pre-glued), I've used Stans successfully but you really should have an extra tire with you.
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Old 01-20-21, 12:36 PM
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Originally Posted by Germany_chris View Post
Tubular tires have a tube sewn into the tire and ... ride wonderfully ...
^ this, in a nutshell. A good set of these tires can transform how a bike rides.
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Old 01-20-21, 12:38 PM
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Originally Posted by niswanger View Post
A bit embarrassed here, but what do you mean exactly? Are these wheels some special size/make? By tubular I always thought standard inner-tube and tire setup? I think these are Nisi 700c Tubular so would a std 700c x 18-25 tube and say 700c X 25c tire not work?
Here you go:

https://www.bikeforums.net/classic-v...y-tubular.html
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Old 01-20-21, 12:55 PM
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Why can't use use std tube/tire setup on tublars? Is it the side-wall height, geometry of the rim that won't hold the tire bead well?
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Old 01-20-21, 01:46 PM
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Originally Posted by niswanger View Post
Why can't use use std tube/tire setup on tublars? Is it the side-wall height, geometry of the rim that won't hold the tire bead well?
There is no sidewall height there's nothing for the tire bead to seat against.

Google some images and you'll see


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Old 01-20-21, 01:51 PM
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Originally Posted by niswanger View Post
Why can't use use std tube/tire setup on tublars? Is it the side-wall height, geometry of the rim that won't hold the tire bead well?
A tubular rim is shallowly concave without hooks to retain the bead of a clincher tire.


EDIT: lol we googled the same image
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Old 01-20-21, 02:00 PM
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Originally Posted by Germany_chris View Post
There is no sidewall height there's nothing for the tire bead to seat against.

Google some images and you'll see


I could have certainly looked that up really quick. I appreciate the help and image...this makes it all so clear to me now. Honestly, as a dear friend just told me...you have a pro support team that can change your tire in 2 minutes or just simply swap out your wheels in seconds? if so they go for it...otherwise clincher/tubless is the way to go. Well, stepping into a vintage build like this it's hard to avoid I guess.

Last edited by niswanger; 01-20-21 at 02:07 PM.
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Old 01-20-21, 02:07 PM
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Originally Posted by niswanger View Post
I could have certainly looked that up really quick. I appreciate the help and image...this makes it all so clear to me now. Honestly, as a dear friend just told me...you have a pro support team that can change your tire in 2 minutes or just simply swap out how wheels in seconds? if so they go for it...otherwise clincher/tubless is the way to go. Well, stepping into a vintage build like this it's hard to avoid I guess.
Properly stretched tubulars aren’t hard to change I would ride a narrow tubular over a narrow clincher any day, and if you look to pros’s for inspiration they ride them.

like I said just put some tubeless sealant in them and you’ll be good
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Old 01-21-21, 07:30 AM
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Originally Posted by niswanger View Post
Pretty sure what I have here in mind to purchase locally is a 58cm 73' Italvega Super Light ...
Roy
Did you buy the bike yet?
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Old 01-21-21, 07:35 AM
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Originally Posted by Phil_gretz View Post
Did you buy the bike yet?
No, he's firm on $600...guess it's just not for me. I think spending $300 on an early 2000's Cannondale is a better bang for buck on the performance/maintenance side of things...I just miss my Columbus Steel Ciocc
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Old 01-21-21, 10:23 AM
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I think if the buyer wants that $ they should rebuild, clean it spotless to a shine. Heck they even may get more if they did.
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Old 01-21-21, 11:37 AM
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@niswanger - Don't be influenced by anyone on the value of tubulars. I can change a tubular and have it pumped up faster than a clincher. Repairing a puncture may take a few min longer but it doesn't take away from riding. The other option is to send it to Tire Alert | Tire Repair and Retubing.

Yes tubular tires are more expensive for really good ones but then so are clinchers. They are NOT rare! My goal is to have tubulars for every road bike.
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Old 01-21-21, 12:48 PM
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I checked the ad and saw it comes with "New Vitoria tubular tires" so that saves a few bills

Then I saw "Missing head badge", so add that to your costs.

Then I saw "One broken spoke". At that point I start thinking of a wheel rebuild at $60+ Canadian a wheel, assuming hubs and rims are good. Lucky for me it's too small and far away..........
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Old 01-26-21, 01:22 AM
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The broken spoke is problematic, it makes one wonder how that happened. However, even though the original drilled Campy derailleur and brakes are gone this is still a very good bike. Italvegas are gaining in respect and the Superlight was top of the line. I admit slight bias as I own one.
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Old 01-26-21, 07:20 AM
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Originally Posted by JRC2K View Post
The broken spoke is problematic, it makes one wonder how that happened. However, even though the original drilled Campy derailleur and brakes are gone this is still a very good bike. Italvegas are gaining in respect and the Superlight was top of the line. I admit slight bias as I own one.
Curious, what do you mean the original drilled Campy derailleur and brakes are gone? Like as in shot, no good? Maybe hard to find?
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Old 01-26-21, 05:31 PM
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As I understand, the original Superlights were delivered with the derailleur cages and brake caliper arms drilled out in the same fashion as the chainrings and frame dropouts. ie drillium. the OPs original posts show a standard cage rear mech. I will grant that it is difficult from the pics to determine if the brake calipers are drilled or not.
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Old 01-26-21, 09:30 PM
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Originally Posted by JRC2K View Post
As I understand, the original Superlights were delivered with the derailleur cages and brake caliper arms drilled out in the same fashion as the chainrings and frame dropouts. ie drillium. the OPs original posts show a standard cage rear mech. I will grant that it is difficult from the pics to determine if the brake calipers are drilled or not.
this bike has had the derailleur pivots exchanged for OMAS or comparable.
it may not be missing all of the drilled components- the early bikes were silly- the crank arms were drilled too ( stupid )
the brake calipers were just styling as was the derailleur cage. The crank arms do have milled out chainring arms.
the finish is “experienced”
$600 is marginal, the broken spoke could have been from careless storage- one had to look, drive side rear wheel would be the first to go from use.
this is not the bike to get if you do not know about tubulars.
the bike in my mind has the risk that you take it all apart and find you need a replacement rear axle or cone, or the spindle is pitted. Problematic headset crown race...
old bike owners often want near top dollar when $150-250 worth of stuff needs to be done.

I bought a sought after bike for serious money a few months ago, it needed all I just mentioned, plus cables, new hoods and brake levers, saddle, I exchanged the wheels and bar and stem, most all from the parts bins.
worth it to me, I have been searching a decade for one same year, same color, size.
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Old 01-26-21, 10:17 PM
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Tubulars have two pluses that are going to bring me back to using them. Glued properly, they do not come off. (But don't let the rim get hot enough to melt the glue you are using.) Blowouts, huge slashes - doesn't matter. Tire stays on and you can ride the bike to a stop from any speed, even braking some with the completely flatted tire. You will never see bare aluminum or carbon fiber rim on the road. Nobody talks about this but I promise you, that is one reason so many pros ride them. Job security.

The really good tubulars have a ride I call the magic carpet. For the same strength and durability, tubular rims weigh a lot less. Tubular tires grip better on hard corners. There is a feel to them that can only be approached with other types. (Like the real magic carpets, they are handmade. They all have quirks, usually a bump around the valve. Flip a magic carpet and look. You'll see a few less than pretty knots left by that ancient Persian. Ride 'em and all that disappears.)
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Old 01-27-21, 12:03 PM
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Originally Posted by 79pmooney View Post
The really good tubulars have a ride I call the magic carpet. For the same strength and durability, tubular rims weigh a lot less. Tubular tires grip better on hard corners. There is a feel to them that can only be approached with other types.
^ I only ride on lower priced tubulars, and they still provide a superior ride to my clincher wheels. This is with all fairly excellent hubs/bearings across the fleet, to be sure.

The tubular wheelset on the Italvega is part of the attraction. If it would fit, I'd recommend that the OP spend the dough and refurbish the bike. He'll be delighted with the result.

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