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Tubulars and pros

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Tubulars and pros

Old 02-11-18, 03:23 PM
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deacon mark
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Tubulars and pros

I tried googling the answer but not many actual stats. Are there pro cyclingist who use clinchers most of the time for racing? I know tubeless is really get the news but I cannot see them going that route if you can go tubulars. You
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Old 02-11-18, 03:33 PM
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When I raced, tubulars were dramatically better and allowed for a much lighter rim choice. This is less of an issue now that tubeless and carbon rims are so readily available.

I don't know what the Pro's are riding. I know if I raced again, I'd go tubeless with carbon clinchers.

Edited to add, by better I mean rolling resistance, cornering, and a less catastrophic result for a flat tire.
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Old 02-11-18, 03:53 PM
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You will find pros using clinchers in the TT. They seat well and are close in lightness - and they get paid to.
I am not aware of any WT pros that ride clinchers most-of-the-time.
Edit Add for James:And not aware of a WT team that races on them.

The clincher setup is generally 300g more and they are still not equivalent in handling. Except, as stated, the clinchers can mount better.

Last edited by Doge; 02-20-18 at 12:55 PM.
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Old 02-11-18, 04:02 PM
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GCN has done a fair number of videos in the last few years touring pro team trucks. I don't think I saw a single instance where they used clinchers.

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Old 02-11-18, 04:06 PM
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Originally Posted by Doge View Post
You will find pros using clinchers in the TT. They seat well and are close in lightness - and they get paid to.
I am not aware of any WT pros that ride clinchers most-of-the-time.

The clincher setup is generally 300g more and they are still not equivalent in handling. Except, as stated, the clinchers can mount better.
I think I recall Tony Martin uses clinchers in TTs.

Here is an article from last year:

Tony Martin spotted using prototype Continental tyres and a single ring in Dauphiné time trial - Cycling Weekly
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Old 02-11-18, 04:24 PM
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Originally Posted by smarkinson View Post
I think I recall Tony Martin uses clinchers in TTs.

Here is an article from last year:

Tony Martin spotted using prototype Continental tyres and a single ring in Dauphiné time trial - Cycling Weekly
I was thinking of him. I know Brandon has.

Doha (UCI Worlds 2016) was particularly flat and smooth and fit clinchers well.

Not all that long ago you could see riders on the same team using blacked out rims and tires, and riders might have different stuff than other teammates (Team Sky used FMBs, Frrome had an ax-lightness for climbing). Now it seems they are all riding what their sponsors give them. Like disc brakes, it is hard to tell what they want to use, by what they use. Team Aqua Blue Sport is on 1X with disc brakes now. Maybe clinchers. But they all do that. They are paid to. Find riders on the team doing differently than the rest of their team and you have a good data point. Harder to find that now.
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Old 02-12-18, 01:48 PM
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I've heard one of the plusses of tubulars for pros is a flat does not automatically equal a crash which takes down many other riders


For the TT, individual at least, clinchers would not cause this issue
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Old 02-12-18, 01:53 PM
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Originally Posted by bikebreak View Post
I've heard one of the plusses of tubulars for pros is a flat does not automatically equal a crash which takes down many other riders
FTR, a flat with clinchers, does not automatically equal a crash which takes down many other riders.
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Old 02-12-18, 02:02 PM
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A flat with clinchers and discs equal hundreds of people in the hospital though.
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Old 02-12-18, 02:03 PM
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Originally Posted by PepeM View Post
A flat with clinchers and discs equal hundreds of people in the hospital though.
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Old 02-12-18, 02:07 PM
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Doubt either is a factor. Discs are allowed, it is not a big safety thing. I think they perform better that is all.

Last edited by Doge; 02-12-18 at 02:14 PM.
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Old 02-12-18, 03:06 PM
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Originally Posted by deacon mark View Post
I tried googling the answer but not many actual stats. Are there pro cyclingist who use clinchers most of the time for racing? I know tubeless is really get the news but I cannot see them going that route if you can go tubulars. You
I would bet racers who have to supply their own equipment, you'll see more of them using clinchers. If you get free gear, go with whatever is most comfortable/responsive etc. Though I suspect they don't get a choice, it's whoever sponsors them and whatever the sponsors gives?
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Old 02-12-18, 03:43 PM
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Originally Posted by zymphad View Post
I would bet racers who have to supply their own equipment, you'll see more of them using clinchers. If you get free gear, go with whatever is most comfortable/responsive etc. Though I suspect they don't get a choice, it's whoever sponsors them and whatever the sponsors gives?
This thread was about what pro teams do. They normally get a choice within the line. So as Conti makes both, I would bet they have a choice - except when pushing a product. Conti was pushing wide, I think they stopped that. So discs brakes likely are not a choice when the team is being paid to push discs.

I was given clinchers to use for free. I bought/buy tubulars - similar to below, same guy, just faster ones.

Sky is sponsored by Conti.
3 years ago this is what they put on their TT bikes. They bought them (I bet paid more than me).
The front wheel looks like a HED, and is unbranded. The rear is likely what it says. They get in a lot more trouble lying about it, than un branding it.
Last two years - they are all riding the same stuff.
FMBonSky.jpg
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Old 02-12-18, 04:05 PM
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Originally Posted by noodle soup View Post
FTR, a flat with clinchers, does not automatically equal a crash which takes down many other riders.
A flat at speed with clinchers can (not "will") result in the tire coming off the rim and jamming in the stays or fork. With properly glued tubulars, that doesn't happen, even in a blowout. I've blown to tubulars at 40+ and had no issues just coming to a stop. I've blown a clincher at 25. I never want that to happen again!

I suspect more than one or two of the pros who ride at 55+mph down mountains have had similar thoughts go through their minds.

Ben
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Old 02-12-18, 04:58 PM
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tubes

Originally Posted by 79pmooney View Post
A flat at speed with clinchers can (not "will") result in the tire coming off the rim and jamming in the stays or fork. With properly glued tubulars, that doesn't happen, even in a blowout. I've blown to tubulars at 40+ and had no issues just coming to a stop. I've blown a clincher at 25. I never want that to happen again!

I suspect more than one or two of the pros who ride at 55+mph down mountains have had similar thoughts go through their minds.

Ben
I have the same questions - when I was young I used tubulars glued with special synthetic glue that was stronger than tubular glue and all was great (had time and patience to do it). did not ride for a long time and used clinchers only in the last 12 years. Now, when the tubular glue tape is proven to be reliable, i'm thinking of switching back to tubies as they have several advantages.
My LBS owner is former racer; I met a lot of people in his shop, as well on the road in the past years - they occasionally race and no one uses anything but tubies. Apart from the cost and bulky spare you have to carry, no other disadvantages.
Except for an odd case, I have not heard of anyone who races on clinchers and even serious training is done on low end tubies.
However, as I have no recent experience (presently using open tubulars with latex tubes) with tubies, I would appreciated feedback from the experienced riders before I embark on this adventure.
xnks
p.s. clincher that won't come off the rim if it blows is harder to install then tubular
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Old 02-12-18, 05:15 PM
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Originally Posted by ninja2 View Post
I have the same questions - when I was young I used tubulars glued with special synthetic glue that was stronger than tubular glue and all was great (had time and patience to do it). did not ride for a long time and used clinchers only in the last 12 years. Now, when the tubular glue tape is proven to be reliable, i'm thinking of switching back to tubies as they have several advantages.
My LBS owner is former racer; I met a lot of people in his shop, as well on the road in the past years - they occasionally race and no one uses anything but tubies. Apart from the cost and bulky spare you have to carry, no other disadvantages.
Except for an odd case, I have not heard of anyone who races on clinchers and even serious training is done on low end tubies.
However, as I have no recent experience (presently using open tubulars with latex tubes) with tubies, I would appreciated feedback from the experienced riders before I embark on this adventure.
xnks
p.s. clincher that won't come off the rim if it blows is harder to install then tubular
Just like clinchers, tubulars are also better than they were.

My kid rides tubulars on 100 mile rides with no spares. He has a cell phone and the USAC podium membership. That depends where you ride. I'd never do that around my house, but where he rides - no flats yet from road derbies in 10K miles.

Tubulars still do not seat as well. Esp the hand made ones. If you want easy - do clinchers. If you are the type to BBQ over wood instead of gas - go tubulars. They are better performing, but for simple practicality, clinchers win.
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Old 02-12-18, 06:29 PM
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I dare say that if we were all pros and had a paid mechanic to do all of our dirty work we would all be riding tubulars and why not.
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Old 02-12-18, 06:37 PM
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true to both earlier posts. in 12 years riding tubes on an open road, had 3 flats. on the trails, in the city, clinchers rule. when i decide about tubular wheels it will be most likely coin flip, the most scientific method.
cheers
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Old 02-12-18, 06:55 PM
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Riding clinchers, is like begging for the grim reaper to take you away.
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Old 02-12-18, 08:58 PM
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Been riding Veloflex Arenbergs on Yoeleo carbon wheels for a year now. Just felt like going to tubs. I wouldn't say the difference is amazing or anything for me, but I haven't had any nostalgia for clinchers. I have used sealant after losing air a couple times and that's worked.

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.
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Old 02-13-18, 06:57 PM
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Define "pro".

Many domestic pros ride/race on clinchers. I haven't had a pro team interested in having tubular rims for road in about 3-4 seasons.
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Old 02-13-18, 07:03 PM
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Originally Posted by Psimet2001 View Post
Define "pro".

Many domestic pros ride/race on clinchers. I haven't had a pro team interested in having tubular rims for road in about 3-4 seasons.
Those that ride for these teams: https://www.procyclingstats.com/teams
Make a living (say $30K/year plus+) and provide for self or the family by cycling as a sole job not requiring book writing, speaking or cookie baking. Not any women. Not the USA tier.

Last edited by Doge; 02-13-18 at 07:10 PM.
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Old 02-13-18, 07:03 PM
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Originally Posted by ninja2 View Post
I have the same questions - when I was young I used tubulars glued with special synthetic glue that was stronger than tubular glue and all was great (had time and patience to do it). did not ride for a long time and used clinchers only in the last 12 years. Now, when the tubular glue tape is proven to be reliable, i'm thinking of switching back to tubies as they have several advantages.
My LBS owner is former racer; I met a lot of people in his shop, as well on the road in the past years - they occasionally race and no one uses anything but tubies. Apart from the cost and bulky spare you have to carry, no other disadvantages.
Except for an odd case, I have not heard of anyone who races on clinchers and even serious training is done on low end tubies.
However, as I have no recent experience (presently using open tubulars with latex tubes) with tubies, I would appreciated feedback from the experienced riders before I embark on this adventure.
xnks
p.s. clincher that won't come off the rim if it blows is harder to install then tubular
I've had great luck and performance out of the Effetto Mariposa Carogna tape. Very secure on my Enve CF rims and on my HED Belgium rims. Comes off clean, holds tight and is fairly easy to change.

Originally Posted by Doge View Post
Just like clinchers, tubulars are also better than they were.

My kid rides tubulars on 100 mile rides with no spares. He has a cell phone and the USAC podium membership. That depends where you ride. I'd never do that around my house, but where he rides - no flats yet from road derbies in 10K miles.

Tubulars still do not seat as well. Esp the hand made ones. If you want easy - do clinchers. If you are the type to BBQ over wood instead of gas - go tubulars. They are better performing, but for simple practicality, clinchers win.
I ride in a rural area where the roads can be pretty sketchy with respect to pavement "defects." When I switched to tubulars (also tubeless tubulars from Clement or Tufo) my number of punctures dropped from 6-8 in 2500 miles to 0-1 in about 3500 miles. A big part of that was getting rid of pinch flats and the rest of it was due to the tubeless nature of the tubulars I ride where the sealant seals up smallish punctures.

I have a bike that I use to for gravel/adventure rides where I use a 30c tire. That's a tubeless clincher with sealant. That also gets less punctures than a traditional clincher but is about 200g heavier than the similar rim and tire I have in tubular (both HED Belgium rims, DT Swiss 240 hubs, Saphim bladed spokes).

Originally Posted by garysol1 View Post
I dare say that if we were all pros and had a paid mechanic to do all of our dirty work we would all be riding tubulars and why not.
Getting a tubular off a rim is a fair bit easier than getting a tubeless clincher off and back on again as far as I'm concerned. I don't think this is a mechanic issue at all. It's simply not that difficult anymore especially when you bring road tubeless clinchers into the discussion.
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Old 02-13-18, 07:17 PM
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Originally Posted by JohnJ80 View Post
...
I ride in a rural area where the roads can be pretty sketchy with respect to pavement "defects." When I switched to tubulars (also tubeless tubulars from Clement or Tufo) my number of punctures dropped from 6-8 in 2500 miles to 0-1 in about 3500 miles. A big part of that was getting rid of pinch flats and the rest of it was due to the tubeless nature of the tubulars I ride where the sealant seals up smallish punctures.
...
Waaaay better in anything that does not cut the case outright. Glass, thorns - that kind of stuff just flats everything. So sealant makes sense to me, or a spare tube or two. I converted back to clinchers as I ride coastal CA where kids like to smash beer bottles on the bike trail and goat head thorns are the local flower. You can't fight-em.

Cobbles, rocks, pot holes - nothing beats tubulars for road. A lot of other surfaces, it really does not matter so much.
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Old 02-13-18, 07:17 PM
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Originally Posted by Doge View Post
Those that ride for these teams: https://www.procyclingstats.com/teams
Make a living (say $30K/year plus+) and provide for self or the family by cycling as a sole job not requiring book writing, speaking or cookie baking. Not any women. Not the USA tier.
I’ve known quite a few riders that have been on World Tour teams that don’t make $30k. I’ve known women who are pros that make more than that but according to you aren’t pros because they are women.

....and with that Doge is on a block list due to blantant sexism.

OP - actual domestic pros ride tons of clinchers. They are all over the field in pro races everywhere in this country->read as any race you may ever see in person.
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