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Possible upgrades to get on MTB?

Old 06-15-20, 07:01 AM
  #1  
littleArnold
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Possible upgrades to get on MTB?

I have a used schwinn Frontier that I bought used from a coworker that I was debating about adding upgrades to. I mainly ride my Trek FX2 hybrid, but I also enjoy riding the MTB. I bought it about 5 years ago from a co-worker who said the bike was previously used by a police officer to do patrols. This bike already has decent front suspension on the bike. The lady also told me her husband made upgrades to the bike. The seat is a very nice wide cushy with a spring.

The pedals are first thing come to mind what I should upgrade they are plastic and I would prefer metal pedals like my Trek has.

Although had bike for 5 years and taken it on mountain bike paths over dirt, roots, gravel the tires dont look worn down at all. They have very good treads on them and I have not once had a flat on this bike. The husband might of upgraded the tires because they looked brand new 5 years ago when got bike from her. I was thinking of maybe upgrading tires...but if they have had great traction and never had one flat with them...

upgrade ideas to slightly improve the bike?
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Old 06-15-20, 05:18 PM
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Hard to know what to tell you to upgrade. Really depends on what you currently don't like. You mention the pedals, so there's a start. Do you find the current ones too flexy, or slippery? Good pedals make a difference, though there are some very good composite (not metal) ones out there. Look for ones with decent pins for traction and a big platform.

What kind of tires are on it? Tires are often the best bang-for-buck investment.

The better you can describe the riding you do on this bike, the better help you will get.

And pics help a lot as well.
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Old 06-15-20, 08:04 PM
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I actually really love this bike, but I know reviewers say it is not a real mountain bike. I am not into doing any very dangerous mountain biking that involves actually climbing up mountains, no mountains no where near me. I use this bike mainly for dirt, gravel, hills or grassy paths. I don't use it for climbing up any extremely steep or dangerous hills and I don't go launching it in the air like you will see riders do in videos. I want an easy, relaxing and enjoyable country ride in the woods enjoying the scenery and giving myself a decent cardio workout. I will interchange between this bike and a hybrid and they both can ride on the same gravel and dirt paths. I will ride this bike when it is muddy out and rained or it is raining very lightly outside and I don't want get my Trek FX 2 Hybrid muddy, dirty, and wet.

It has Kendra tires and Shimano Shifters... at least it says shimano. Shifting has been good and 5 years had the bike can't say had any serious issues shifting, unlike a huffy bike I threw away before I bought this one from a co-worker 5 years ago. It has nice front suspension. She did say her husband did upgrades on the bike, but can't remember what he upgraded. It is a Frontier Schwinn MTB.

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Old 06-16-20, 10:16 AM
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Chain as it's probably worn & pedals & brake pads if they are dry or worn.. Don't assume metal pedals are better. The new plastic pedals many companies are producing are pretty great. One Up, Nuke proof & racefaceare some examples.
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Old 06-16-20, 01:04 PM
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Originally Posted by littleArnold View Post
I actually really love this bike, but I know reviewers say it is not a real mountain bike. I am not into doing any very dangerous mountain biking that involves actually climbing up mountains, no mountains no where near me. I use this bike mainly for dirt, gravel, hills or grassy paths. I don't use it for climbing up any extremely steep or dangerous hills and I don't go launching it in the air like you will see riders do in videos. I want an easy, relaxing and enjoyable country ride in the woods enjoying the scenery and giving myself a decent cardio workout. I will interchange between this bike and a hybrid and they both can ride on the same gravel and dirt paths. I will ride this bike when it is muddy out and rained or it is raining very lightly outside and I don't want get my Trek FX 2 Hybrid muddy, dirty, and wet.

It has Kendra tires and Shimano Shifters... at least it says shimano. Shifting has been good and 5 years had the bike can't say had any serious issues shifting, unlike a huffy bike I threw away before I bought this one from a co-worker 5 years ago. It has nice front suspension. She did say her husband did upgrades on the bike, but can't remember what he upgraded. It is a Frontier Schwinn MTB.
I believe you mean "Kenda" tires? What model? They make like 98 different bicycle tires. Show a pic if you don't know.
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Old 06-16-20, 03:52 PM
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Touch points like pedals, saddle, and grips are great places to start.

Good plastic and metal pedals can be had for not a lot of money (I am running DMR V6 pedals ($20) on my mountain bike, they're awesome if you're not to hard on them: the nylon pins sheer off easily when you hit rocks with them). Others such as RF Chesters can be had for a little more with replaceable metal pins and roller bearings.

After that, the sky's the limit! You may wind up spending more than the bike is worth but who cares if you like it?
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Old 06-16-20, 04:41 PM
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You make it sound like you don't need anything for it. You should go ride it a bit and see if anything comes to mind, but if it doesn't, that is ok
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Old 06-22-20, 03:38 AM
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Plastic pedals with metal pins like Raceface Chesters or similar would be sensible, and checking to see if the bike needs any maintenance (worn chain, etc). Other than that it seems to meet your needs, so why mess with it?

Upgrades to working parts are usually a poor use of money unless you have a pretty concrete complaint you want to resolve. For what it's worth, pretty much the only other thing that comes to mind that could sensibly improve the bike would be high end, high TPI tires with tread well suited to your riding terrain (sounds like you could probably get away with relatively low profile tread), although for best value you can wait until yours actually need replacing.
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Old 06-22-20, 08:53 AM
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Originally Posted by cpach View Post
Plastic pedals with metal pins like Raceface Chesters or similar would be sensible, and checking to see if the bike needs any maintenance (worn chain, etc). Other than that it seems to meet your needs, so why mess with it?

Upgrades to working parts are usually a poor use of money unless you have a pretty concrete complaint you want to resolve. For what it's worth, pretty much the only other thing that comes to mind that could sensibly improve the bike would be high end, high TPI tires with tread well suited to your riding terrain (sounds like you could probably get away with relatively low profile tread), although for best value you can wait until yours actually need replacing.
Tires + touch points (pedals, like you suggest) are usually the biggest bang for the buck.
For tires, I usually replace the rear when it wears down with the EXISTING front tire and put the new rubber up front (so I have the newest tire in front, which is more important because it does more to keep you alive)

Then when the rear wears out it gets the new one (usually front isn't worn down by then)

I have found this to be a very economical way to replace tires. And yes - hi-TPI + widest the OP can fit in the frame will be a good place to start!
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Old 06-24-20, 09:23 AM
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If you have clearance in the frame/fork for a bigger tire, consider moving up a size to improve comfort and traction.

For example., if you currently have size 26 x 1.95 tires, see if you have room to fit a 26 x 2.2 tire, especially in the back where you don't have suspension. For the rear tire, the bottom bracket area is usually the limiting factor (the area behind the crank spindle, between the two chainstays).

Have fun!
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