Cyclocross and Gravelbiking (Recreational) This has to be the most physically intense sport ever invented. It's high speed bicycle racing on a short off road course or riding the off pavement rides on gravel like :The Dirty Kanza". We also have a dedicated Racing forum for the Cyclocross Hard Core Racers.

Wiki list of Gravel tires

Old 07-22-17, 12:28 PM
  #51  
DrIsotope 
Non omnino gravis
 
DrIsotope's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: SoCal, USA!
Posts: 6,381

Bikes: Nekobasu, Pandicorn

Mentioned: 88 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3403 Post(s)
Liked 38 Times in 30 Posts
Tire:
Panaracer Gravelking SK 700x35. Mounts to exactly 38mm wide on 17mm internal wheel.
Tread pattern:
3 rows of ~3mm knobs with ~3mm spacing between knobs, then two rows of bar-block knobs on the rest of the tread surface. Sidewalls are smooth.
Construction:
Panaracer makes no mention of tpi (that I can find) but they are as supple as your usual Panaracers. Dual-compound tread, "anti-flat casing" is bead to bead. Tubed or tubeless, limited to 70psi tubed or 60psi tubeless. Actually alarmingly light for such a big, treaded tire-- 380g.
Performance on pavement:
Surprisingly good. The width, suppleness, and tread combine to give a little bit of resistance in what I call the "transitional phase" between say 13-18mph. At least more than a smooth tire, anyway. Above 20mph, they cruise along as if they were 700x25 slicks.
Performance on firm and smooth gravel:
We have little in the way of gravel here, but we do have hardpack/loose-over-hard dirt in the shape of fire and access roads. The Gravelkings feel exactly the same on hardpack and loose-over-hard as they do on clean pavement. Have taken them up some fairly steep dirt trail, and even out of the saddle, they are firmly planted.
Performance on deep or soft gravel:
Can't say. I also haven't taken them into sand, but don't really plan on it.
Durability:
Too early to tell. Ordinarily I don't even start to think about any review/opinionating until I've god a good amount of miles on them, but straight out of the box they have thoroughly impressed. Even riding right through fields of visible tribulis terrestris, they didn't pick up a single thorn.
Ride:
Running them tubeless @ 60psi, haven't even thought to tinker with pressures. They are exceptionally comfortable on road and off. They outroll the Maxxis ReFuse TR that they replaced, despite mounting 6mm wider and being covered in knobs.

I didn't buy them specifically intending them for gravel, as we don't have that here-- they're intended for pavement (and those vast sections of what we dare to call pavement) and scrabbly SoCal hardpack... and washed out hardpack. It's far to early to say they're perfect, but at first blush they sure look perfect.
__________________
DrIsotope is offline  
Old 10-05-17, 02:56 PM
  #52  
shoota 
Senior Member
 
shoota's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: not sure
Posts: 6,210
Mentioned: 15 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 933 Post(s)
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Originally Posted by Barrettscv View Post
700x36 tubeless Clement MSO: X'PLOR MSO | Clement Cycling, Cyclocross Tires, Adventure Tires, Mountain Bike Tires, Road Bike Tires
  • size: 700x36, about 37.1mm wide
  • tread pattern: tightly packed small knobs for mostly dry conditions
  • construction: unknown tpi, has flat protection, tubeless
  • performance on pavement is excellent for a knobby tire. It's like most touring tires this size with secure cornering on wet or dry pavement.
  • performance on firm gravel is excellent, with excellent cornering and braking
  • performance on deep or soft gravel is very good with good control and sufficient volume over rough surfaces. Excellent braking in soft conditions. Cornering performance and float on soft surfaces is limited by the lack of bigger knobs on the shoulder.
  • durability: good so far
  • ride: smooth and plush

The tubeless MSO is easy to mount. I've installed the tire on two rims, one from Alex and another from Impulse. Both tire installations were easy using a conventional floor pump. I coated the rim and tire in the bead area with soapy water and the tire seated itself quickly.

The tubeless version of the MSO is more versatile than the tube version. It fits more bikes, including most Cyclocross bikes, due to the smaller size. It feels much lighter and is. It rolls faster at 55psi and has excellent soft gravel performance at 40psi. It rides smoother than the already smooth 700x40.

The tire is a great all-around performer.
Totally agree with this assessment, mine are even 37.1mm on 24ID wheels too. I just rode a set that came on my wife's Jamis so they are an OEM version that is not TR, has a stiff bead, and is only 30TPI. I ran them at 40psi and did a 40/60 pavement/gravel ride on them. I'm coming from 42mm GKs setup tubeless at ~37psi. The MSOs were just a touch stiffer on gravel, just a touch less grippy on loose steep climbs, and a touch less floaty over soft stuff. However, they were fast on hardpack, cornered just fine, and felt fast on pavement, even at 40psi tubed. I can only imagine the 120tpi version set up tubeless would feel even better. I'm not sure a person with frame clearance issues (CX bikes) could do a whole lot better.
__________________
2014 Cannondale SuperSix EVO 2
2015 Cannondale SuperX Hi-Mod
shoota is offline  
Old 10-05-17, 03:02 PM
  #53  
shoota 
Senior Member
 
shoota's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: not sure
Posts: 6,210
Mentioned: 15 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 933 Post(s)
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Originally Posted by Barrettscv View Post
bump
Just a suggestion here. At some point when this thread gets too long people are either going post a duplicate or not post at all because they won't want to read the whole thread to what's been reviewed already. Maybe in your first post you could have a list of which tires have been reviewed and their post number, kinda like an index.
__________________
2014 Cannondale SuperSix EVO 2
2015 Cannondale SuperX Hi-Mod
shoota is offline  
Old 10-05-17, 07:39 PM
  #54  
Barrettscv 
Have bike, will travel
Thread Starter
 
Barrettscv's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Lake Geneva, WI
Posts: 12,003

Bikes: Ridley Helium SLX, Canyon Endurance SL, De Rosa Professional, Eddy Merckx Corsa Extra, Schwinn Paramount (1 painted, 1 chrome), Peugeot PX10, Serotta Nova X, Simoncini Cyclocross Special, Raleigh Roker, Pedal Force CG2 and CX2

Mentioned: 40 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 709 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 13 Times in 6 Posts
Hutchinson Override 700x38

Size: 700x38, about 39mm wide, about 400 grams each.
Tread pattern: minimal file tread pattern in the center, progressively larger file tread on the shoulder.
Construction: 127 tpi, flat protection included, tubeless
Performance on pavement is excellent, like most road bike tires
Performance on firm gravel is excellent with very good cornering grip on a hardpacked fine gravel
Performance on deep or soft gravel is acceptable, float and traction is sufficient due to the wide footprint and supple construction.
Durability: good so far
Ride: super smooth and plush

The tire was eventually easy to install tubeless with a standard floor pump. I did pre-fit the tire using a tube and let it take shape at 80psi for 48 hours. This allowed the tire to seat quickly and hold air with 30 ml of sealant.

The Hutchinson Override is lightweight and very fast rolling. The Override helped me nearly produce the same kind of speeds I experience on my road bike on pavement with 700x25 Rubino Pro tires. Performance on a wide range of dry surfaces is excellent. Firm gravel, dry grass, dry single-track are all traveled with speed and confidence. Soft and rutted single-lane gravel roads require focus and skill, but can be covered quickly with sufficient traction. Wet gravel and pavement are acceptably easy to travel if the rider avoids any excessive banking during turns. I avoid wet earth and grass, it's not the right tire for those conditions.

PS;
I've covered more miles and completed the 50 miles Cuba Gravel Crisis with the Override. I continue to be highly impressed with the tire. Traction, durability, reliability all continue to remain at a high level. I'm unable to break the rear tire loose on soft sandy trails, unless it's a very steep climb and I stand while mashing the pedals. Simply sitting on the saddle re-establishes traction. The front tire also maintains traction well on flatter routes. However, I'll install a knobby tire, like the WTB Riddler, on the front if I expect faster downhill sections that require urgent braking and cornering. No need to remove the Override from the rear. It rolls fast with a surplus of traction.
__________________
When I ride my bike I feel free and happy and strong. I'm liberated from the usual nonsense of day to day life. Solid, dependable, silent, my bike is my horse, my fighter jet, my island, my friend. Together we will conquer that hill and thereafter the world.

Last edited by Barrettscv; 10-28-17 at 10:35 AM.
Barrettscv is offline  
Old 10-08-17, 07:40 AM
  #55  
intransit1217
Senior Member
 
intransit1217's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: Kenosha , Wi
Posts: 1,205

Bikes: 2013 specializes secure sport, Salsa vaya, Masi giramondo

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 36 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
GREAT THREAD ! My new to gravel experience (non racing) is limited to the wtb nano 40, clement mso 40, and clement ush 36. And is mostly on par with the above comments.

The ush is faster and just as cush as the mso 40, but a wider footprint is nicer in the loose stuff. And for very loose stuff, I'd probably rather have the nano's on. Not likely to try anything under 36. Looking for a 38 for my next pair.
intransit1217 is offline  
Old 11-06-17, 11:05 AM
  #56  
Barrettscv 
Have bike, will travel
Thread Starter
 
Barrettscv's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Lake Geneva, WI
Posts: 12,003

Bikes: Ridley Helium SLX, Canyon Endurance SL, De Rosa Professional, Eddy Merckx Corsa Extra, Schwinn Paramount (1 painted, 1 chrome), Peugeot PX10, Serotta Nova X, Simoncini Cyclocross Special, Raleigh Roker, Pedal Force CG2 and CX2

Mentioned: 40 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 709 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 13 Times in 6 Posts
Originally Posted by shelbyfv View Post
After being inflated for a week, my 32mm Gravelkings have still not grown beyond 29mm. I would return them but I asked my LBS (owner friend) to special order them and I hate to bother him again. I emailed Panaracer to complain but I doubt I'll hear back. Sucks.
Shelbyfv,

Do you still have the 32mm Gravelkings installed? How wide are they now and what rim are they installed on?
__________________
When I ride my bike I feel free and happy and strong. I'm liberated from the usual nonsense of day to day life. Solid, dependable, silent, my bike is my horse, my fighter jet, my island, my friend. Together we will conquer that hill and thereafter the world.
Barrettscv is offline  
Old 11-21-17, 09:34 PM
  #57  
TimothyH
- Soli Deo Gloria -
 
TimothyH's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Northwest Georgia
Posts: 13,509

Bikes: 2018 Rodriguez Custom Fixed Gear, 2017 Niner RLT 9 RDO, 2015 Bianchi Pista, 2002 Fuji Robaix

Mentioned: 205 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6075 Post(s)
Liked 111 Times in 76 Posts
Originally Posted by DrIsotope View Post
Tire:
Panaracer Gravelking SK 700x35. Mounts to exactly 38mm wide on 17mm internal wheel.
Tread pattern:
3 rows of ~3mm knobs with ~3mm spacing between knobs, then two rows of bar-block knobs on the rest of the tread surface. Sidewalls are smooth.
Construction:
Panaracer makes no mention of tpi (that I can find) but they are as supple as your usual Panaracers. Dual-compound tread, "anti-flat casing" is bead to bead. Tubed or tubeless, limited to 70psi tubed or 60psi tubeless. Actually alarmingly light for such a big, treaded tire-- 380g.
Performance on pavement:
Surprisingly good. The width, suppleness, and tread combine to give a little bit of resistance in what I call the "transitional phase" between say 13-18mph. At least more than a smooth tire, anyway. Above 20mph, they cruise along as if they were 700x25 slicks.
Performance on firm and smooth gravel:
We have little in the way of gravel here, but we do have hardpack/loose-over-hard dirt in the shape of fire and access roads. The Gravelkings feel exactly the same on hardpack and loose-over-hard as they do on clean pavement. Have taken them up some fairly steep dirt trail, and even out of the saddle, they are firmly planted.
Performance on deep or soft gravel:
Can't say. I also haven't taken them into sand, but don't really plan on it.
Durability:
Too early to tell. Ordinarily I don't even start to think about any review/opinionating until I've god a good amount of miles on them, but straight out of the box they have thoroughly impressed. Even riding right through fields of visible tribulis terrestris, they didn't pick up a single thorn.
Ride:
Running them tubeless @ 60psi, haven't even thought to tinker with pressures. They are exceptionally comfortable on road and off. They outroll the Maxxis ReFuse TR that they replaced, despite mounting 6mm wider and being covered in knobs.

I didn't buy them specifically intending them for gravel, as we don't have that here-- they're intended for pavement (and those vast sections of what we dare to call pavement) and scrabbly SoCal hardpack... and washed out hardpack. It's far to early to say they're perfect, but at first blush they sure look perfect.

Just mounted these on 24 mm inside width rims and they measure 38.5 mm. They are more difficult to get over the side of the rim than 35 mm Schwalbe G-One. Lots of mounting fluid had to be used before the bead snapped into place at about 55 PSI.

Performance on pavement
: I'm spoiled by Schwalbe G-One's and they don't roll as fast, noticeably more rolling resistance. Some noise.

Performance on loose gravel: front washed out once in a hairpin turn while descending through loose gravel. I thought I was going down but it grabbed as suddenly as it let go and I snapped upright. I think the side knobs grabbed. There seems to be a no-man's land between the center knobs and the side knobs where there is little or no traction and the tire either has to be leaned hard or kept upright. Did not inspire confidence in aggressive turns. Hooked up nicely when climbing, even out of the saddle on steep/loose.

I feel that the Panaracer Gravelking SK needs to be run at a lower pressure than the comparable Schwalbe G-One and I will be experimenting.


-Tim-

Last edited by TimothyH; 11-26-17 at 06:25 PM.
TimothyH is offline  
Old 11-25-17, 07:18 PM
  #58  
shelbyfv
Senior Member
 
shelbyfv's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 4,995
Mentioned: 16 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 993 Post(s)
Liked 25 Times in 20 Posts
Originally Posted by Barrettscv View Post
Shelbyfv,

Do you still have the 32mm Gravelkings installed? How wide are they now and what rim are they installed on?
Sorry for the late reply. The original rims were Open Pro and the tires only grew to about 30mm. I replaced the wheels with Pacenti SL23 and the tires then measured 33mm. I guess they needed a bigger platform to reach their true potential.
shelbyfv is offline  
Old 11-26-17, 12:36 PM
  #59  
Marcus_Ti 
Frozen Solid.
 
Marcus_Ti's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Lincoln, Nebraska
Posts: 4,536

Bikes: Roadie: Seven Axiom Race Ti w/Chorus 11s. CX/Adventure: Carver Gravel Grinder w/ Di2

Mentioned: 26 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1855 Post(s)
Liked 20 Times in 12 Posts
Vittoria Terreno Dry Tire, 700x40c

https://www.vittoria.com/zh-hant/tire/terreno-dry-2/


size: 700x40C (advertised), 700x38C (sidewall label), 622-40 (Vittoria's package label)...IRL 38.5mm on SL25 rims

tread pattern: Semi-slick center with knobby shoulders. Center has (very) slightly raised hexagons, shoulder has trapezoidal blocks

construction: 120TPI. 460grams, so lighter for a 40mm-class tire. Rated for up to 35-87PSI per the sidewall. Actually a TCS certified tire I believe. Result, is these are a bit of a hassle to mount (bead jack time)--but they really snap into the rim and will stay there even when flat--like a proper tubeless setup....unlike Panaracer ghetto tubeless.

Interestingly, has a bit of a "V" profile to the center of the treat when mounted, unlike others that are rounded.

performance on pavement: In wet or dry quite good. Spin up faster than more file-knobby center gravel tires. Don't spit gravel back at people in a paceline. Being semi-slick they due spray water a bit when wet. Being a smaller "700x40ish" circumference tire they have fewer gear inches-so you'll probably end up using one higher gear.

performance on firm and smooth gravel: As good as pavement. Confident cornering

performance on deep or soft gravel: In this stuff, all narrower tires suffer a bit whether knobby or not...and IMHO you tend to be more limited by tire width than tread pattern. In any case, it isn't very confident and can get squirrely.

durability: Running tubeless, seals well. Very wide range of pressures on the sidewall. Doesn't wear down in the center as much as knobbie tires when predominantly on pavement.

ride: Smooth, although it does have a bit of "Tie Fighter" tread air-noise when spinning. A nice quicker choice for harder ground. And with support for a wide range of pressures (sidewall says 35-87PSI!) can handle heavy loads like touring/panniers as well as rec riding on dry gravel/MMR or paved stuff.

Last edited by Marcus_Ti; 11-26-17 at 12:40 PM.
Marcus_Ti is offline  
Old 02-08-18, 12:24 PM
  #60  
TimothyH
- Soli Deo Gloria -
 
TimothyH's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Northwest Georgia
Posts: 13,509

Bikes: 2018 Rodriguez Custom Fixed Gear, 2017 Niner RLT 9 RDO, 2015 Bianchi Pista, 2002 Fuji Robaix

Mentioned: 205 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6075 Post(s)
Liked 111 Times in 76 Posts
Lots of entries about the Panaracer Gravelking SK here so I'll just add a few data points.

Yesterday I mounted a 700x38C pair tubeless onto American Classic 29" RACE wheels with 24 mm inside width.

They went on easier than the 35 mm version and seated quickly using a compressor regulated to 50 PSI. Measured width was almost exactly 38 mm when mounting but after sitting for a day they have swelled to almost 41 mm. They were only ridden around the block to distribute sealant so a proper ride is needed but I don't expect anything different from what others have noted.

I would however, like to correct what I wrote in post 57 above.

Originally Posted by TimothyH View Post
Performance on loose gravel: front washed out once in a hairpin turn while descending through loose gravel. I thought I was going down but it grabbed as suddenly as it let go and I snapped upright. I think the side knobs grabbed. There seems to be a no-man's land between the center knobs and the side knobs where there is little or no traction and the tire either has to be leaned hard or kept upright. Did not inspire confidence in aggressive turns.
This was rider technique, not the fault of the tire. I was on the front brake too late into the turn causing the front to wash out. It is a habit which I had carried over from years of late braking driving cars and riding bicycles on pavement. Panaracer Gravelking SK are much better than I gave them credit for.


-Tim-

Last edited by TimothyH; 02-08-18 at 12:29 PM.
TimothyH is offline  
Old 02-09-18, 08:43 PM
  #61  
jitteringjr
Senior Member
 
jitteringjr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2001
Location: Colorado
Posts: 1,957

Bikes: 2018 Canyon Aeroad CF SLX 9.0 2016 Bombtrack Arise Campy build cross bike 2005 Fuji Outland Pro

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 357 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Barrettscv View Post
Kenda Happy Medium: 700x32. Kenda Tires | Bicycle | Happy Medium Pro

size: 700x32, about 32.5mm wide
tread pattern: file tread in the center and small blocks on the shoulder
construction: 120 tpi, flat protection
performance on pavement is sluggish, cornering is not secure
performance on firm gravel is good, with good traction but slow going
performance on deep or soft gravel is safe but not outstanding
durability: below average but could last 1500 miles
ride: moderately good
I am new to gravel biking and have only used these tires in a 40C. I wished I had seen this thread before buying these because my experience with them has been just like you said. I will say they do perform pretty well on the single track clay we have here in Colorado, but they are dogs on pavement and gravel isnít much better.
jitteringjr is offline  
Old 02-11-18, 05:34 AM
  #62  
andrei_r
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Location: Montreal, Canada/ Brasilia, Brazil (currently)
Posts: 568

Bikes: Giant FCR 3 with lots of mods, Brazilian made Caloi 100.

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 182 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by jitteringjr View Post
but they are dogs on pavement and gravel isnít much better.
May I ask what you're comparing them to?

I'm interested in getting one of those as a rear tire and the comments I see range from "they fly" to "they're boat anchors". I think it's due to what each person has previously used. People who find them fast are coming from small block 8s and nanos (the latter being marketed as fast tires themselves btw).

Any comments on durability?

Thanks.
andrei_r is offline  
Old 02-12-18, 12:00 AM
  #63  
jitteringjr
Senior Member
 
jitteringjr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2001
Location: Colorado
Posts: 1,957

Bikes: 2018 Canyon Aeroad CF SLX 9.0 2016 Bombtrack Arise Campy build cross bike 2005 Fuji Outland Pro

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 357 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by andrei_r View Post
May I ask what you're comparing them to?

I'm interested in getting one of those as a rear tire and the comments I see range from "they fly" to "they're boat anchors". I think it's due to what each person has previously used. People who find them fast are coming from small block 8s and nanos (the latter being marketed as fast tires themselves btw).

Any comments on durability?

Thanks.
As I mentioned I am new to gravel riding so I donít really have direct experience yet on wider 700C tires but I have been riding my MTB on gravel with Michelin XC road tires which are essentially 35C slicks for 26Ē wheels and the Continental Contact city tires so that is my only point of reference.

As far as durability, I only have about 200 miles on my happy mediums so not much to go on. They seem ok for now.
jitteringjr is offline  
Old 03-23-18, 01:52 PM
  #64  
Barrettscv 
Have bike, will travel
Thread Starter
 
Barrettscv's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Lake Geneva, WI
Posts: 12,003

Bikes: Ridley Helium SLX, Canyon Endurance SL, De Rosa Professional, Eddy Merckx Corsa Extra, Schwinn Paramount (1 painted, 1 chrome), Peugeot PX10, Serotta Nova X, Simoncini Cyclocross Special, Raleigh Roker, Pedal Force CG2 and CX2

Mentioned: 40 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 709 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 13 Times in 6 Posts
Originally Posted by Marcus_Ti View Post
Vittoria Terreno Dry Tire, 700x40c

https://www.vittoria.com/zh-hant/tire/terreno-dry-2/


size: 700x40C (advertised), 700x38C (sidewall label), 622-40 (Vittoria's package label)...IRL 38.5mm on SL25 rims

tread pattern: Semi-slick center with knobby shoulders. Center has (very) slightly raised hexagons, shoulder has trapezoidal blocks

construction: 120TPI. 460grams, so lighter for a 40mm-class tire. Rated for up to 35-87PSI per the sidewall. Actually a TCS certified tire I believe. Result, is these are a bit of a hassle to mount (bead jack time)--but they really snap into the rim and will stay there even when flat--like a proper tubeless setup....unlike Panaracer ghetto tubeless.

Interestingly, has a bit of a "V" profile to the center of the treat when mounted, unlike others that are rounded.

performance on pavement: In wet or dry quite good. Spin up faster than more file-knobby center gravel tires. Don't spit gravel back at people in a paceline. Being semi-slick they due spray water a bit when wet. Being a smaller "700x40ish" circumference tire they have fewer gear inches-so you'll probably end up using one higher gear.

performance on firm and smooth gravel: As good as pavement. Confident cornering

performance on deep or soft gravel: In this stuff, all narrower tires suffer a bit whether knobby or not...and IMHO you tend to be more limited by tire width than tread pattern. In any case, it isn't very confident and can get squirrely.

durability: Running tubeless, seals well. Very wide range of pressures on the sidewall. Doesn't wear down in the center as much as knobbie tires when predominantly on pavement.

ride: Smooth, although it does have a bit of "Tie Fighter" tread air-noise when spinning. A nice quicker choice for harder ground. And with support for a wide range of pressures (sidewall says 35-87PSI!) can handle heavy loads like touring/panniers as well as rec riding on dry gravel/MMR or paved stuff.
I am also now using the 700x40 Terreno dry, I'm happy with the tire. I use it on the front wheel and the Hutchinson Override on the rear. I'm very happy with this combination.

My 700x40 Terreno measure 41mm wide on a WTB i23 rim. This rim is 28mm wide, external.
__________________
When I ride my bike I feel free and happy and strong. I'm liberated from the usual nonsense of day to day life. Solid, dependable, silent, my bike is my horse, my fighter jet, my island, my friend. Together we will conquer that hill and thereafter the world.

Last edited by Barrettscv; 03-24-18 at 11:19 AM.
Barrettscv is offline  
Old 05-01-18, 11:35 AM
  #65  
Marcus_Ti 
Frozen Solid.
 
Marcus_Ti's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Lincoln, Nebraska
Posts: 4,536

Bikes: Roadie: Seven Axiom Race Ti w/Chorus 11s. CX/Adventure: Carver Gravel Grinder w/ Di2

Mentioned: 26 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1855 Post(s)
Liked 20 Times in 12 Posts
Specialized Sawtooth 42mm.

Link:
https://www.specialized.com/us/en/sa...ready/p/130002

My own pics:
https://imgur.com/a/A5N3I

size: diameter and width, bonus points for actual measurements

42mm. IRL, on Pacenti SL25 rims, inflated they measure exactly that. These are a fair bit smaller in diameter (circumference) than say Panaracer GravelKing SK 43mm. AAMOF, IME they take a full cassette-gear higher ratio to attain the same speeds.

tread pattern: slick, semi-slick with some texture, small knobs for dry conditions, deeper knobs for soft or damp conditions, etc

Kind of a semi-slick. Refer to the pics above. Like the name and pics show, these are a sawtooth pattern of angles from shoulder-to-shoulder. NOTE tread is directional. Great for dry and hardpack. Note, being semi-slick they won't spit gravel like GKs...but they will spray water when wet--either have fenders or be prepared to get rooster-tail up your backside.


construction: tpi, flat protection, tubeless ready, etc
A) 120TPI
B) These are tubeless (Spec calls it "2Bliss" probably to be annoying), and they snap right in easily.
C) These are more a touring tire cable of offroading. They're also a thicker tread and 100grams heavier per tire than say the GravelKing SK 43mm.

performance on pavement
These are beastly tires to use for pavement, unless you're bagged touring/commuting. Otherwise there's little need for a 42mm tire on pavement unless you're commuting through a cratered moonscape of pavement. Being big and heavy, they're slow to accelerate, like all tires this size and weight class. IMHO, unless you're touring or commuting (or mixing touring/commuting/gravel) the 42mm are overkill and the 38mm would be a better choice....although at lower pressure-terrible city streets are nowhere near as bad with a fat tire like this

performance on firm and smooth gravel
Hardpack and smooth, they're great. NOTE the Specialized posted pressures 50-80PSI (for 700x42) are either an outright error--or are idiocy. There's no need to ride a 42mm tire at even 50-PSI unless you're bagged touring with a crapload of camping gear. For solo gravel grinding 30-40PSI produces a nice ride. They have enough bite to go, but not so much as to slow you down with excess traction....sure they're slow to accelerate, but once going they roll nicely and hold momentum well.

performance on deep or soft gravel
These tires simply aren't built for these conditions. For flat courses, so long as you have momentum and control your line, you can make do. But if you stand and power or are climbing in pea gravel, you're going to spin your wheel until you run out of momentum.

durability
I haven't yet even punctured these....despite bagged commuting through broken glass on the MUT. The extra weight does seem to pay dividends in puncture resistance (compared to GK SKs or Vittoria Terreno Dry). Less aggressive tread wears less on pavement as well (I'm looking at you GK SK).

ride
If you ignore Specialized's recommended pressure range...they ride great in either urban jungle or bad roads or MMRs. If you use the recommended pressures, expect to need to see your dentist for your missing teeth.

For people doing hardpack/dry riding or mixing commuting/touring/hardpack-offroading....a great affordable tire at $40 each they a steal IMHO for that use. Any comparable touring/off-roading tire is going to cost 25%+ more each.

Last edited by Marcus_Ti; 05-01-18 at 11:44 AM.
Marcus_Ti is offline  
Old 12-19-18, 05:07 AM
  #66  
Barrettscv 
Have bike, will travel
Thread Starter
 
Barrettscv's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Lake Geneva, WI
Posts: 12,003

Bikes: Ridley Helium SLX, Canyon Endurance SL, De Rosa Professional, Eddy Merckx Corsa Extra, Schwinn Paramount (1 painted, 1 chrome), Peugeot PX10, Serotta Nova X, Simoncini Cyclocross Special, Raleigh Roker, Pedal Force CG2 and CX2

Mentioned: 40 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 709 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 13 Times in 6 Posts
Bump
__________________
When I ride my bike I feel free and happy and strong. I'm liberated from the usual nonsense of day to day life. Solid, dependable, silent, my bike is my horse, my fighter jet, my island, my friend. Together we will conquer that hill and thereafter the world.
Barrettscv is offline  
Old 12-19-18, 09:31 AM
  #67  
DrIsotope 
Non omnino gravis
 
DrIsotope's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: SoCal, USA!
Posts: 6,381

Bikes: Nekobasu, Pandicorn

Mentioned: 88 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3403 Post(s)
Liked 38 Times in 30 Posts
Tire:
Hutchinson Overide TR 700x35. Mounts to 36mm wide on 19mm internal wheel.
Tread pattern:
Smooth/file tread center strip, staggered diamond/triangle knobs at edges, "happy medium" style. Sidewalls are smooth.
Construction:
127tpi, tubeless ready construction, maximum pressure 87psi. Dual-compound rubber, tires usually weigh 350-360g each.
Performance on pavement:
Excellent. I routinely do all-paved rides on my CX bike of 18-19mph average. They roll exceptionally well.
Performance on firm and smooth gravel:
These are the tires I have crowned "the best all-around tire there is." I take them places they have absolutely no business going, and they never complain-- and because I (almost) never drive a car to where I'm going to ride, they're usually out on fire roads, access roads, and singletrack pumped up to road pressures. They do well even on blown-out sand over clay, inflated to +65psi.
Performance on deep or soft gravel:
Well, they act like a slick here, so there's oft times some walking. At least at my weight, if there's too much give to the surface, no amount of tread will help, only width.
Durability:
The tire currently mounted to my front wheel was installed on January 18, 2018, and has logged just shy of 5,000 miles. I have recorded zero puncture flats. I lost a rear tire very early in it's live after running over not one but two drywall screws. They went all the way through and punctured my rim tape. I had to use a screwdriver to remove them. They have been otherwise trouble-free. The replacement rear tire wore to the cords, and the one that replaced that is at ~1,400 miles. Barring incident, I generally get 3,000-3,500 out of a rear tire.
Ride:
Running them tubeless @ 65-70psi. The feel like road tires. They have enough volume to be comfortable, but they're not heavy or sluggish. The knobs are usually just enough for off-road, and I never even notice them on the pavement. The review from CX Magazine summed them up very well (paraphrased The Overide excels on pavement, bad roads, and dirt and gravel hardpack paths. The smooth center tread holds the Overide back when conditions get loose or sloppy. It won't win any tractor pull contests in deep gravel or loose dirt. There's no tall center knob to cut through loose gravel, and certainly not enough side knob to offer much confidence in wet and slippery off-road surfaces. But it stands as a superbe Pavť tire, one that thrives at the intersection between rough roads and gravel.
__________________
DrIsotope is offline  
Old 12-24-18, 06:47 PM
  #68  
rosefarts
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2015
Posts: 586
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 240 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 15 Times in 5 Posts
Can someone compare the Gravelking SK to the Maxxis Rambler EXO?

Specifically, I have the 38mm Maxxis Rambler EXO and am looking into something a little wider to float over loose stuff. Also, a lot of my riding is on loose shale mountain bike trails. I've suffered sidewall damage on the rear tire, so it's booted and tubed now.

Reading this thread, I believe that that 38mm Gravelking will give me a 40-41mm tire while my 38mm Ramblers are 38mm. That's just about where I want it. The next size up, the 43 has potential to cause problems if it measured 45+. It might be OK, I'd have to check pretty carefully.

Bullet point questions
-Do they ride similar?
-Sidewall durability?
-Least monkeying with tubeless (I'll set them up with Orange Seal and Skinny Strippers, and i don't want to touch them again until they wear out)
-Is it 360 vs 380g?
rosefarts is offline  
Old 12-26-18, 10:18 AM
  #69  
shoota 
Senior Member
 
shoota's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: not sure
Posts: 6,210
Mentioned: 15 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 933 Post(s)
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Originally Posted by rosefarts View Post
Can someone compare the Gravelking SK to the Maxxis Rambler EXO?

Specifically, I have the 38mm Maxxis Rambler EXO and am looking into something a little wider to float over loose stuff. Also, a lot of my riding is on loose shale mountain bike trails. I've suffered sidewall damage on the rear tire, so it's booted and tubed now.

Reading this thread, I believe that that 38mm Gravelking will give me a 40-41mm tire while my 38mm Ramblers are 38mm. That's just about where I want it. The next size up, the 43 has potential to cause problems if it measured 45+. It might be OK, I'd have to check pretty carefully.

Bullet point questions
-Do they ride similar?
-Sidewall durability?
-Least monkeying with tubeless (I'll set them up with Orange Seal and Skinny Strippers, and i don't want to touch them again until they wear out)
-Is it 360 vs 380g?
At the risk of not answering your questions I'm going to suggest you don't use either of these tires for your riding conditions. The GK lacks in sidewall bite for loose conditions, and the Rambler is not a comparatively durable tire. If you're going for a ~38mm tire then I think you would do better with a Specialized Trigger Pro. Just my two cents.
__________________
2014 Cannondale SuperSix EVO 2
2015 Cannondale SuperX Hi-Mod
shoota is offline  
Old 02-04-19, 03:05 PM
  #70  
rosefarts
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2015
Posts: 586
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 240 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 15 Times in 5 Posts
Originally Posted by shoota View Post
At the risk of not answering your questions I'm going to suggest you don't use either of these tires for your riding conditions. The GK lacks in sidewall bite for loose conditions, and the Rambler is not a comparatively durable tire. If you're going for a ~38mm tire then I think you would do better with a Specialized Trigger Pro. Just my two cents.
At this point, I can't seem to do the mental gymnastics to install a set of tires that would add over 1/2 pound to the bike, in outside rotating mass.

I'm not unreasonable, I know that I've got extremely light tires and I'll need to go up a little in weight for durability.

Is there a decent tubeless tire for dry dirt/gravel/shale in the <440g range. Lets pretend initial price is no object but replacing tires more than a couple times a year is a no go.
rosefarts is offline  
Old 02-04-19, 03:42 PM
  #71  
shoota 
Senior Member
 
shoota's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: not sure
Posts: 6,210
Mentioned: 15 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 933 Post(s)
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Originally Posted by rosefarts View Post
Bullet point questions
-Do they ride similar?
-Sidewall durability?
-Least monkeying with tubeless (I'll set them up with Orange Seal and Skinny Strippers, and i don't want to touch them again until they wear out)
-Is it 360 vs 380g?
Originally Posted by rosefarts View Post
At this point, I can't seem to do the mental gymnastics to install a set of tires that would add over 1/2 pound to the bike, in outside rotating mass.

I'm not unreasonable, I know that I've got extremely light tires and I'll need to go up a little in weight for durability.

Is there a decent tubeless tire for dry dirt/gravel/shale in the <440g range. Lets pretend initial price is no object but replacing tires more than a couple times a year is a no go.
Hello again

I think you're asking for the mythical "perfect" gravel tire. You have to give up something somewhere. Light, big, durable, pick two.

But for your listed desires I think the Rambler in the toughest casing (Silkshield?) at 415g is your best bet. Followed by GK SK 38mm.

edit: Or maybe it's the 120TPI EXO Rambler that's the tougher tire. Whichever it is pick that one.
__________________
2014 Cannondale SuperSix EVO 2
2015 Cannondale SuperX Hi-Mod

Last edited by shoota; 02-04-19 at 03:55 PM.
shoota is offline  
Old 02-12-19, 09:21 AM
  #72  
rosefarts
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2015
Posts: 586
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 240 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 15 Times in 5 Posts
I ordered the Gravelking SK in a greenish blue and Blackwall. It'll be a very fashion forward look on my bike.

This thread swayed me towards them over the Maxxis Ramblers.

The GK clearly say what sort of protection they have, weight, and tpi.

With the maxxis, some are EXO, some Silkshield. Some 60 TPI, some 120. I reread the product description on multiple websites. It was never clear in their description which was the tougher product. Including the Maxxis site. It would be difficult to know what you're getting until it shows up. Especially confusing because they all have the same price.

I still have the 120tpi EXO ramblers, with a sidewall patch. I'll ride them on different wheels with tubes around our local choss.
rosefarts is offline  
Old 04-18-19, 10:35 AM
  #73  
Barrettscv 
Have bike, will travel
Thread Starter
 
Barrettscv's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Lake Geneva, WI
Posts: 12,003

Bikes: Ridley Helium SLX, Canyon Endurance SL, De Rosa Professional, Eddy Merckx Corsa Extra, Schwinn Paramount (1 painted, 1 chrome), Peugeot PX10, Serotta Nova X, Simoncini Cyclocross Special, Raleigh Roker, Pedal Force CG2 and CX2

Mentioned: 40 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 709 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 13 Times in 6 Posts
bump
__________________
When I ride my bike I feel free and happy and strong. I'm liberated from the usual nonsense of day to day life. Solid, dependable, silent, my bike is my horse, my fighter jet, my island, my friend. Together we will conquer that hill and thereafter the world.
Barrettscv is offline  

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

Copyright © 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.