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Winter Transportation Plan

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Winter Transportation Plan

Old 10-27-18, 12:27 PM
  #51  
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Originally Posted by wolfchild View Post
Of all the radical stuff you posted on these forums this is probably the most amusing one of them all. Now you advocating that we humans should start learning from apes and adopt and mimic their behaviour and diet.
Enough of these hostile attacks and accusations. How did humans develop flight except by watching and seeking to mimic birds? How did Europeans learn to grow potatoes except by mimicking the people they encountered who had already mastered that crop? It's ridiculous to get in an argument because someone mentions that gorillas, primates of similar size to humans, are able to live by eating local wild plants in the forest on a mountain. If doing so could prevent people from having to drive over a mountain all the time, it would help with LCF, the same as having a local community garden can help reduce the amount of produce you have to carry from the grocery store.
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Old 10-27-18, 01:49 PM
  #52  
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Originally Posted by tandempower View Post
Enough of these hostile attacks and accusations. How did humans develop flight except by watching and seeking to mimic birds? How did Europeans learn to grow potatoes except by mimicking the people they encountered who had already mastered that crop? It's ridiculous to get in an argument because someone mentions that gorillas, primates of similar size to humans, are able to live by eating local wild plants in the forest on a mountain. If doing so could prevent people from having to drive over a mountain all the time, it would help with LCF, the same as having a local community garden can help reduce the amount of produce you have to carry from the grocery store.
I was trying to be nice and respectful and tried to stay on topic of winter transportation....until this idea came along that gorillas and apes should be teaching humans on how to live a sustainable car-free lifestyle...BTW gorillas are tropical creatures who swing on tree branches and use trees for transportation and they can't really teach you anything about car-free winter transportation.
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Old 10-27-18, 02:40 PM
  #53  
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Originally Posted by wolfchild View Post
I was trying to be nice and respectful and tried to stay on topic of winter transportation....until this idea came along that gorillas and apes should be teaching humans on how to live a sustainable car-free lifestyle...BTW gorillas are tropical creatures who swing on tree branches and use trees for transportation and they can't really teach you anything about car-free winter transportation.
No, it was a tangent that came from Machka's thing about the hill being a difficult obstacle for car-free commuting. That led me to empathize that I would also find it tedious to surmount such a large hill everyday under the time crunch of getting to work on time. At that point my mind went into the mode of wondering, "how would people/animals have dealt with such an obstacle before motor vehicles were available?" That's when I began thinking about mountain people cultivating potatoes to grow at high elevations and gorillas that gain massive muscle mass from eating 70lbs of greens per day.

By all means continue posting winter LCF plans, as per the OP. Sorry if the hill-crossing side-talk distracted you from focusing on the coming cold.
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Old 10-27-18, 03:36 PM
  #54  
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Originally Posted by tandempower View Post
That's when I began thinking about mountain people cultivating potatoes to grow at high elevations and gorillas that gain massive muscle mass from eating 70lbs of greens per day.
It's a scientific fact that gorillas have a different digestive system from humans. They can eat twigs and tree branches and convert that to nutrients and energy inside their bodies... Humans can't do that because we are different. I challenge you or anybody to go eat 50 pounds of greens a day and see what will happen.
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Old 10-27-18, 03:38 PM
  #55  
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Originally Posted by tandempower View Post
No, it was a tangent that came from Machka's thing about the hill being a difficult obstacle for car-free commuting. That led me to empathize that I would also find it tedious to surmount such a large hill everyday under the time crunch of getting to work on time. At that point my mind went into the mode of wondering, "how would people/animals have dealt with such an obstacle before motor vehicles were available?" That's when I began thinking about mountain people cultivating potatoes to grow at high elevations and gorillas that gain massive muscle mass from eating 70lbs of greens per day.

By all means continue posting winter LCF plans, as per the OP. Sorry if the hill-crossing side-talk distracted you from focusing on the coming cold.
They went round the coast or on water.
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Old 10-27-18, 03:51 PM
  #56  
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Originally Posted by wolfchild View Post
It's a scientific fact that gorillas have a different digestive system from humans. They can eat twigs and tree branches and convert that to nutrients and energy inside their bodies... Humans can't do that because we are different. I challenge you or anybody to go eat 50 pounds of greens a day and see what will happen.
Maybe so. It was just an example. I'm sure even importing food it would be possible for people to live on the far side of hills. They would just have to be diligent and efficient coordinating truck shipments over the hills. Anyway, it's not a winter cycling issue, as you mentioned, and it's been discussed in the past to no fruitful end so LCF remains, as ever, a complex dance within a motor-biased economic culture.
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Old 10-27-18, 03:53 PM
  #57  
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Originally Posted by Machka View Post
They went round the coast or on water.
I guess you could say the moral of this story is that driving is what puts human civilization 'over the hill.'
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Old 10-27-18, 04:09 PM
  #58  
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Originally Posted by tandempower View Post
I guess you could say the moral of this story is that driving is what puts human civilization 'over the hill.'

When the coastal route was established, there were no cars.
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Old 10-28-18, 11:23 AM
  #59  
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Originally Posted by Machka View Post
When the coastal route was established, there were no cars.
And presumably not enough population to worry about expanding to the other side of hill.
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Old 10-28-18, 11:04 PM
  #60  
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Originally Posted by tandempower View Post
And presumably not enough population to worry about expanding to the other side of hill.
Hobart was established in 1804 at the mouth of the Derwent River.

In 1808 the first white settlers arrived in the district at what is now known as Brown’s River, named after botanist Mr Robert Brown.

By the 1830s the district was still sparsely populated by European settlers. There was no church, no school, no post office – in fact, no regular communication with Hobart Town.

In 1835, a farmer by the name of Proctor completed a road between Hobart Town and his property at Brown’s River. The Government, having refused to provide any financial assistance to Mr Proctor in the five year building project, declared the road a public thoroughfare – providing a much-needed link between Brown’s River and Hobart Town.

Governor Denison proclaimed the district a township on 27 January 1851.
[named Kingston]

The municipality had a number of thriving townships outside Kingston. Snug had settlers as early as 1822 and Woodbridge, once known as Peppermint Bay, was settled in 1847. Taroona, one of the first settled districts in the area, is noted for historic landmark the Shot Tower, which was established as a flourishing industry in 1870.

And so on ... you can keep reading about the economic development of the area, etc. here:

https://www.kingborough.tas.gov.au/k...about/history/
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Old 10-29-18, 06:40 AM
  #61  
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Originally Posted by Machka View Post
[I]Hobart was established in 1804 at the mouth of the Derwent River.
[Skip]

And so on ... you can keep reading about the economic development of the area, etc. here:

https://www.kingborough.tas.gov.au/k...about/history/
Why would someone want to read about history and learn the truth, when wondering, thinking and imagining provides a "reality" that better suits an agenda/ideology?
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Old 10-29-18, 11:00 AM
  #62  
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Originally Posted by Machka View Post
Hobart was established in 1804 at the mouth of the Derwent River.

In 1808 the first white settlers arrived in the district at what is now known as Brown’s River, named after botanist Mr Robert Brown.

By the 1830s the district was still sparsely populated by European settlers. There was no church, no school, no post office – in fact, no regular communication with Hobart Town.

In 1835, a farmer by the name of Proctor completed a road between Hobart Town and his property at Brown’s River. The Government, having refused to provide any financial assistance to Mr Proctor in the five year building project, declared the road a public thoroughfare – providing a much-needed link between Brown’s River and Hobart Town.

Governor Denison proclaimed the district a township on 27 January 1851.
[named Kingston]

The municipality had a number of thriving townships outside Kingston. Snug had settlers as early as 1822 and Woodbridge, once known as Peppermint Bay, was settled in 1847. Taroona, one of the first settled districts in the area, is noted for historic landmark the Shot Tower, which was established as a flourishing industry in 1870.

And so on ... you can keep reading about the economic development of the area, etc. here:

https://www.kingborough.tas.gov.au/k...about/history/
Look, I'm not trying to get into the details of how specific localities developed. People make decisions based on what they think is best at the time. I just guessed that there were no settlements on the far side of the hill before motorized transportation, and if they were, they must have been relatively self-sufficient communities because I can't believe people were commuting over that hill daily without driving.

Is there a reason you want to continue discussing this besides getting the Winter Transportation Plan thread flushed to P&R?
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Old 10-29-18, 11:55 AM
  #63  
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Originally Posted by badger1 View Post
This. It's really quite simple. As both @Rowan and @Machka point out, the details of coping with winter weather on a bicycle are well-covered in the Winter Cycling and Commuting sub-forums -- if the op is actually interested in those details. Absolutely no need for a thread about it here.
This is a perfectly legitimate topic for this forum.
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Old 10-29-18, 11:58 AM
  #64  
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Originally Posted by Machka View Post
This is taken from the top of the big hill I mentioned. It's about 10 km to get there.

And the shoulder disappears about there for a while as well. A screaming descent with no shoulder ... for a while. After a bit, we can descend in the bus lane before we're dumped into the main street traffic of the city.


Are photos reversed in the southern hemisphere?

Just kidding - I know they drive on the left.

Last edited by cooker; 10-29-18 at 12:02 PM.
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Old 10-29-18, 12:00 PM
  #65  
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I've posted a few times that I don't bike on ice and snow. However the public transit commute is so much slower than cycling that I dread the end of cycling season.

However I am transitioning to working two days (half days, actually) from home as a pre-retirement stage, so I will only have to commute 3 days a week.
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Old 10-29-18, 12:53 PM
  #66  
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Originally Posted by cooker View Post
Are photos reversed in the southern hemisphere?

Just kidding - I know they drive on the left.
I had the same mental reflex at first, except it was to imagine riding on the shoulder next to the median.

I then realized the bike lane would be on the outside of the road (on the left) instead of the inside.

. . . when left is right and right is wrong
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Old 10-29-18, 07:16 PM
  #67  
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Originally Posted by cooker View Post
This is a perfectly legitimate topic for this forum.
The title of the thread is a legitimate topic to discuss... but the discussion itself went off the rails really fast.
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Old 10-29-18, 08:39 PM
  #68  
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Originally Posted by tandempower View Post
Look, I'm not trying to get into the details of how specific localities developed. People make decisions based on what they think is best at the time. I just guessed that there were no settlements on the far side of the hill before motorized transportation, and if they were, they must have been relatively self-sufficient communities because I can't believe people were commuting over that hill daily without driving.

There were settlements and the connected with Hobart by boat.
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Old 10-30-18, 10:25 AM
  #69  
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Originally Posted by Machka View Post
There were settlements and the connected with Hobart by boat.
This is turning into a fascinating topic. Should we start another thread on it?
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Old 10-30-18, 10:38 AM
  #70  
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Originally Posted by tandempower View Post
This is turning into a fascinating topic. Should we start another thread on it?
Yes, in Foo or Facebook where it belongs, and combine this thread with it.
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Old 10-30-18, 11:04 AM
  #71  
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Originally Posted by I-Like-To-Bike View Post
Yes, in Foo or Facebook where it belongs, and combine this thread with it.
You don't think discussion your winter or other seasonal transportation plans as someone living car free?
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Old 10-30-18, 11:57 AM
  #72  
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Originally Posted by cooker View Post
This is a perfectly legitimate topic for this forum.
if this is so perhaps you can tell us why in the world people wouldn’t just live on one side of a hill or mountain and develop their own economy? I take it that would make LCF easier?

Maybe be you can explain how living like a mountain gorilla would make LCF in the winter more sustainable? Both subjects broached by the OP.

With that reasoning it would seem living like a Gorilla in Florida without mountains and eating leaves would be the most sustainable way to LCF in the winter.

Since the op opined on this idea is it not proper to get it addressed?
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Old 10-30-18, 01:31 PM
  #73  
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I put my fenders back on my Fargo over the weekend.
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Old 10-30-18, 01:41 PM
  #74  
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Originally Posted by enigmaT120 View Post
I put my fenders back on my Fargo over the weekend.
That's the spirit!

To continue it: it is dry here today, and about 9C temperature. Therefore, I rode my bike to work, and shall ride home, because conditions suited me. I chose clothing suitable for the weather.

Tomorrow, I will likely use transit because conditions will not suit me for cycling.

I'm sure everyone will find this information fascinating.
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Old 10-30-18, 05:38 PM
  #75  
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Originally Posted by badger1 View Post
That's the spirit!

To continue it: it is dry here today, and about 9C temperature. Therefore, I rode my bike to work, and shall ride home, because conditions suited me. I chose clothing suitable for the weather.

Tomorrow, I will likely use transit because conditions will not suit me for cycling.

I'm sure everyone will find this information fascinating.
sounds a lot like what someone might do any of the other three seasons.
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