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Stay with racing frame or move to touring?

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Stay with racing frame or move to touring?

Old 01-23-19, 03:40 PM
  #1  
Midway
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Stay with racing frame or move to touring?

I have left 60 astern, am coming up on two months after a total hip replacement, 6 months from an ablation procedure and want to get back in shape. I am doing great and have no limitations.

My bike has been hanging in the garage for 15 years as a guess, and had been gathering dust. There was a time I rode quite a bit but found it too time consuming with work and other hobbies. I put the bike away and ran for exercise because it didnít take as much time. Running will wear my new hip down faster and my doctor prefers I ride rather than run so the bike is back in play.

I have the bike on a trainer for now to get my legs and hip in shape and plan on dropping it off for a tune-up next week.

I am concerned the frame is a bit too twitchy for me. I donít plan on much racing and my bike seemed a bit too responsive even 20 years ago. I plan on asking the bike shop to check my set up, seat and handlebar configuration etc.

It is a Colnago Master PIU with an Ultegra group set. It is still in great shape and I plan on giving it some miles but wonder if it would be more enjoyable to lean more towards a touring style bike?

I am athletic and by looking at me you would think I was in great shape, a solid looking 6 foot, 195 pounds and low body fat but with the recent medical issues, I have a very low fitness level. I feel great now though and with a college athletic scholarship background know how to train if I put my mind to it.

Appreciate opinions and who knows, I might find my current frame will be fine.
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Old 01-23-19, 03:54 PM
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Originally Posted by Midway View Post
I have left 60 astern...

It is a Colnago Master PIU with an Ultegra group set.
The bow here is still heading towards that 60 'Berg

Your Colnago sounds like a sweet bike.

I still like my road bikes, and put quite a few miles on the bike. My brother who is 2 1/2 years older than me has been complaining that his old Raleigh just isn't as comfortable as it once was, but I don't think he is doing even 50 miles a month. He has adopted Dad's Torpado with the ancient Brook's saddle, and upright moustache bars, and I think is doing ok with that bike.

If you are doing well on the trainer, then I'd keep the Colnago for a while and see how it feels.

But, the answer will depend on what kind of riding you have planned. If you are planning, say 10 miles around the park, then you might do well with a Hybrid, or something different.

On the other hand, if you are anticipating to 20 or 30 mile rides regularly, and tossing in a few century rides, then I'd keep the Colnago.

There are quite a few riders doing Century rides, Randonneur Events, & etc, who are 50+, 60+, or even 70+.
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Old 01-23-19, 04:07 PM
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I am 66 and my opinion would be to give yourself some time to ride the Colnago. If, after X amount of time, you are not comfortable, both physically and mentally, you can then go to a tour bike or hybrid. If you decide to go in that direction, I do not think you would have any trouble selling the Colnago.
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Old 01-23-19, 04:07 PM
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What do you want a bike for? want to take up bike touring in retirement ? then by all means get a touring bike..

ride loops from your house & back, your classic road bike will be good enough..

Me?

I just clocked 70 a year ago I use my Bike Friday more than any others , now.. They have legions of people touring on them around the globe..

Newest NWT with Disc Brakes you can go with 451 fast wheels or 406 wide rugged ones both nominal 20"..


I gain the benefits of a step thru frame functionally..

long list of options bike built to order when your list comes up in the building queue..


give them a chat , say what you like about your bike, speak about what you want different..
You can even take the train, between Seattle & Eugene & visit them, there..





for actually touring they pack in a suitcase, no dragging a big box through the airports..



NB; When my leg /hip was not flexing well, I laid the diamond frame down, stepped over it, and then brought the bike underneath me..





..

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Old 01-23-19, 04:38 PM
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I appreciate the replies. I plan on giving the Colnago a chance and even if it is a bit aggressive for me, I will keep it and pick up another bike. My wife wants to start riding as well and I wouldn't want to be on the Colnago when riding with her.

I'm looking forward to getting out on the road again.

Thanks again.
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Old 01-23-19, 06:01 PM
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Originally Posted by Midway View Post
My wife wants to start riding as well and I wouldn't want to be on the Colnago when riding with her.
His & Hers Colnago Road Bikes?

I wouldn't try it until you are sure you have your road legs back under yourself, but there are also tandems, recumbent tandems, and tandem trikes. Also upright Captain, Recumbent Stokers.
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Old 01-23-19, 06:48 PM
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If you haven't test-ridden the wide range of bike styles currently available (road, road plus, all-road, gravel, etc.) you should if your current bike isn't right for you anymore. There are many comfortable, sporty, drop-bar bikes out there. Personally, I favor a somewhat more upright position with the seat approximately level with the drop bars, 'sport' geometry (somewhere between 'race' and 'tour'), and large-ish tires (35 - 38mm). I happen to find this combo with a mid-80's steel framed bike that I rebuilt with modern components.

However, here is an example of one of the recent entries into the do-more-with-one-bike category that I'd like to try - below.

I could go just about anywhere on this bike. Also, fenders, racks, bags - all sorts of cool stuff can be added to it.

https://surlybikes.com/bikes/midnight_special

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Old 01-23-19, 10:47 PM
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Touring bike for the more relaxed ride, or for racks, panniers and travel touring?

If for the relaxed but fun and fast ride, I'd go for a Trek Domane or Specialized Roubaix. Both range from reasonably priced models to ha-ha-I'll-never-afford-that budgets. Sporty but suited to rougher pavement and some gravel, and ridden by pros on the cobbled classics.

I've ridden a Tarmac and while it's a wonderful race bike it's not practical for me. I'll never be fast enough even in my own age group. And the novelty of the quick feel would probably wear thin on longer rides.

In a touring touring bike for travel touring, I'd probably go for an older classic steel frame since I have the tools and could work on one easily. If I could afford it, probably a Co-Motion.
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Old 01-23-19, 11:58 PM
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Originally Posted by canklecat View Post
Touring bike for the more relaxed ride, or for racks, panniers and travel touring?

If for the relaxed but fun and fast ride, I'd go for a Trek Domane or Specialized Roubaix. Both range from reasonably priced models to ha-ha-I'll-never-afford-that budgets. Sporty but suited to rougher pavement and some gravel, and ridden by pros on the cobbled classics.
Are these what my limited research refers to as endurance bikes? Bikes that are more relaxed and are designed to provide a more comfortable ride, allowing slightly wider tires, fenders for my rainy Seattle weather and disc brakes?

I read a review of the Cannondale Synapse Carbon Disc Ultegra SE and it sounds like the style of bike I would like to add. I would want to look at other bikes in that class before making a decision.

I still plan of getting back on the Colnago saddle first.

Thanks.
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Old 01-24-19, 12:50 AM
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Yup, endurance bikes. The Cannondale Synapse is another good 'un. I think Fabian Cancellara finished his pro career Tour of Flanders ride on a Trek Domane, a little more relaxed bike than his earlier monument race wins (Specialized Tarmac, I think).

That category would be my choice for my next drop bar bike, mostly due to old and new injuries -- old neck and back, more recent shoulder and neck injuries. And ortho docs say there's age related joint deterioration on top of the injuries. Gotta be realistic at 61.

My road bike is an '89 Centurion Ironman, which is slightly relaxed compared with other bikes of that era -- crit and short stage race bikes that ended in sprints. It was developed for the early long time trial stage of the Ironman triathlon competitions. The original 130mm stem was too long and stretched out for my comfort. I switched to a 90mm stem and made other adjustments to make it a bit more comfortable but still fun to ride. And the steel frame and fork have enough give to be tolerable on rough pavement, as long as I keep the tire pressure reasonable and my arms and core are fit enough. But I can handle only 20-30 miles continuous riding before I need a break to stretch. So I've had to skip the longer semi-fast club rides the past year.

My favorite bike for longer more casual rides is a '92 Univega Via Carisma, with a longer wheelbase, more flexible fork, etc., all suitable for long rides and some gravel. But it's a little heavy, upright even with albatross bars at saddle height, and takes a lot of effort to push faster than around 14 mph.

I know from the one high end carbon fiber bike I've ridden -- a Specialized Tarmac -- that a good bike can be stiff and responsive but also ergonomically comfortable and not necessarily harsh. And lightweight enough to make a difference on climbs. But to be realistic an endurance bike would suit me better than the road race geometry of the Tarmac and similar bikes.
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Old 01-24-19, 01:07 AM
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I raced a Colnago in the day. Had a '73 Paramount also. Always preferred the Para for long rides. Sold the Colnago after a chainstay cracked to a collector. Sold the Para thinking I was done with road bikes. Finally coming back to them. Bought a Surly Cross Check. Steel. Classic geometry. Feels very similar to the Paramount, but new, with modern components. A vintage Paramount showed up locally on CL. Really thought about it. It won't be better. Decided I'm good.....
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Old 01-24-19, 01:27 AM
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I've fallen down the Rabbit Hole of liking light and fast (and interesting) bikes. Not that I'm particularly fast.

I do have my old Colnago Super from decades back, and I do like it. But, the Carbon Fiber Colnago C40 is a SWEET RIDE!!!



Ok, so eventually I might upgrade to something actually new. Well, not quite new.

Last summer I met a guy, about 75 or so, with his ultralight CF bike. He lived at the top of a fairly steep hill, and the lightweight bike was a big plus.

Some of your choices will be dictated by the environment you're living in.

Hills, flats, short rides, long rides, fast, slow, cargo, etc.

For "new" bikes, you might look at the Specialized Roubaix. It is supposed to be designed with flex where one wants it, and strong where it is needed.

Another thing. I still like my skinny tires, but there is some emphasis on somewhat larger more cushy tires.

At least the "cheap" tires seem to have a bit more rolling resistance, but that doesn't necessarily hold true for all, with some claiming that the quality wider tires have close to the same efficiency in the casual road riding range (10 to 20 MPH) as the narrow tires. 28mm? 32mm? 35mm? And, they give a more comfortable ride, in theory.
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Old 01-24-19, 08:00 AM
  #13  
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In the 15 years since you hung up the Colnago, the cycling world has expanded to include more options for riding, achieving goals and having fun.

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Old 01-24-19, 09:50 AM
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When you take your bike in for the overhaul, try to pick a sunny (OK, it's Seattle, a not-raining hard) day. Look at what the shop has, do a few test rides to see what they feel like.

Take the bike home and ride it until April. At that point the bike shops should be full of new bikes. Choose another sunny day or two, and go ride some. See if any of them make you want to ride more than what you've got now.

If the shop is nice and the bikes don't inspire you, buy a water bottle instead.
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Old 01-24-19, 12:12 PM
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both. add a relaxed geometry bike that will take bigger tires. alternate riding them
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Old 01-24-19, 12:49 PM
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I'd start with the bike you have now. Assuming it fit you well before and you don't have a joint or back issues that have occurred since then, it will likely still fit you.
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Old 01-24-19, 03:06 PM
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Originally Posted by Midway View Post
Are these what my limited research refers to as endurance bikes?

.
Endurance bikes will be more comfortable for long hard days in the saddle, but for "not twitchy" and wide tires and just fun, try a gravel bike. Also LOW gears and disk brakes. Here's Cannondale's offering:

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Old 01-25-19, 09:59 AM
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What size is that Italian bike?
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Old 01-25-19, 10:50 AM
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Originally Posted by Wildwood View Post
What size is that Italian bike?
I can't remember. I have been digging for the receipt but no luck yet. How do you measure a frame? I assume somewhere between 58 and 61. I can't receive PM's until I make 10 posts by the way. I plan on keeping the frame for now. I always have regretted not putting campy components on it but a budget decision at the time. Regards,
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Old 01-25-19, 11:20 AM
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Originally Posted by DiabloScott View Post
Endurance bikes will be more comfortable for long hard days in the saddle, but for "not twitchy" and wide tires and just fun, try a gravel bike. Also LOW gears and disk brakes. Here's Cannondale's offering:

Pretty much what all the riders in my group are going to. I've been a holdout, still running my 23cm tires, but my next project will be something with fatty tires. 2 months on the new hip? Guess they are cutting you loose. I'm a year out from a hip surgery with complications and have to say it made life much more enjoyable.
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Old 01-25-19, 11:47 AM
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Originally Posted by curbtender View Post
Pretty much what all the riders in my group are going to. I've been a holdout, still running my 23cm tires, but my next project will be something with fatty tires. 2 months on the new hip? Guess they are cutting you loose. I'm a year out from a hip surgery with complications and have to say it made life much more enjoyable.
I was just in for my 6 week checkup and my doctor said no restrictions, if it hurts, donít do it or at least back off. Sometimes I forget and donít even think about the hip but every once in awhile Iíll move a certain way and feel a sharp pain.

Iíve been riding the trainer and did feel some burning near my stitches after three straight days so took the weekend off and all is fine.

I do need to build up my fitness before I get on the road. I can not afford to fall and am told it takes up to 9 months to fully heal. I live on the West Hill of Kent just north of Federal Way and in my younger days used to ride from my house to the Green River trail but I will drive down with my bike to the flats for the time being. The hill back home is pretty steep in places.

Sorry you still have complications but glad overall things are more enjoyable.
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Old 01-25-19, 12:20 PM
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I had an infection from surgery that required it to be replaced again after a week. Any pains I feel now are from nerves finding their way back. Usually a quick sharp pain that runs down the side of my leg. Just spent two days up in my trees topping and shaping them. Nice to be able to swing my legs over the branches again. I lost 25 pounds from the ordeal and I'm trying to keep them off. Stick with it, it gets better.
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Old 01-25-19, 12:38 PM
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Keep the bike or buy a new carbon. That's a classic though, ride it proudly. My best bike is a '99 carbon Trek, still a perfect bike. A touring frame would be heavy and beat you up. Riding's supposed to be fun. Enjoy.
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Old 01-25-19, 12:42 PM
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I saw a good article somewhere about disc brakes. The concept was that the big change disc brakes have allowed is the idea that the frame designers have a lot of options to make the clearances in the fork and chainstay areas to allow for bigger wheels and tires. That had been somewhat limited when rim brakes were used.

Having that room for big tires and rims, also allows frames to accommodate a 700C or 650B wheel, just with a swap.

You can now get bikes that allow multiple wheels to be swapped, one with a lighter and narrower tire, maybe your carbon fast club ride wheels, then swap to an aluminum wheel with more spokes, 36mm tires, greater cog numbers, and have your hilly gravel bike. All with one bike. Pretty cost effective as it allows you to plunk down the cash for a carbon frame, maybe Di2 or such.
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Old 01-26-19, 06:52 AM
  #25  
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For me, the sweet spot in road bike design is an older racing (sports touring, by today's standards) frame from the 1960s, or any decent sports touring frame from the 1970s or 1980s. Not all "comparable" frames are that similar in this regard -- my 1981/2 Bianchi cannot accommodate tires larger than about 26mm (700Cx28 callout size works if they are Contis, which run small), whereas my 1980 Peugeot PKN-10 had enough clearance for full 28mm -- and many callout 700Cx32 -- tires.

What counts are parameters such as tire width and pressure (inversely correlated), top tube length, seat tube length, fork rake, chainstay length, and, to a lesser extent, frame material. I lean toward steel because I ride older / "classic" bikes exclusively, currently with nothing newer than the 1980s. (If it works, why update / replace it? )
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