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Stay with racing frame or move to touring?

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Stay with racing frame or move to touring?

Old 01-26-19, 11:38 AM
  #26  
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Originally Posted by Steve B. View Post
I saw a good article somewhere about disc brakes. The concept was that the big change disc brakes have allowed is the idea that the frame designers have a lot of options to make the clearances in the fork and chainstay areas to allow for bigger wheels and tires. That had been somewhat limited when rim brakes were used.
Mountain bikes used rim brakes for 30+ years, but road bikes had to go to discs to allow room for bigger section tires? Shenanigans.
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Old 01-26-19, 11:43 AM
  #27  
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Ride the bike you have for a good while. Just getting back on the bike is not going to feel the same as being in cycling shape and on the bike. If, after that time, you don't feel good on the bike, go try some other bikes. Forget the labels like "race" or "touring" and find out what works for you.
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Old 01-26-19, 02:07 PM
  #28  
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Originally Posted by tcs View Post
Mountain bikes used rim brakes for 30+ years, but road bikes had to go to discs to allow room for bigger section tires? Shenanigans.
If you want V's or canti's, sure you have flexibility in frame and fork clearance. Lot's of shenanigans all over though, disc maybe not the worst of them. I'd say the idiocy with press-fit b-brackets is a more likely candidate for the "lets fix a problem that doesn't exist" category.

Disc's DO offer advantages over rim of any style, likely the only important ones are moderation and functionality when wet. Maybe you get some versatility in carbon rims, that want to be disc in any event. But when the major shifter manufacturers won't make brifters that play well with V or canti, then you move on, as we ain't changing Shimano's mind on this. And a side effect of disc on road bikes, is the frame designers get some leeway in the design and can allow clearance for larger tires. That's proven as a good thing. If the flexibility then exists to swap wheels for different surface conditions,than the user just got 2 bikes in 1, fast road with skinny tires and big tired gravel. Win/Win in my mind.
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Old 01-31-19, 10:48 AM
  #29  
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I didn't read all the replies, so I apologize if others have already made similar suggestions.

You might try modding the old bike. Might be able to flip up the stem (or even replace it with a shorter one) to get a more upright and comfortable position. Might also be able to squeeze slightly wider tires into the frame. This might give more comfort, but might not address the "twitchiness."

If you do want a new bike, the market for stable, comfortable distance bikes has blown up in recent years, so you have many options. Look at bikes marketed in the "endurance" and "gravel" categories. I'm 56 now, and I'll never buy another road racing bike again.
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Old 01-31-19, 01:16 PM
  #30  
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I ride my Bike Friday, most , because it is functionally a step thru.. many people tour on those.. including this guy..


https://thelazyrando.wordpress.com/2...-pocket-llama/






...
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Old 01-31-19, 08:21 PM
  #31  
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I picked up my Colnago from Tight Bike who did the tune-up tonight and it looks beautiful. I can't wait to take it for a spin but may wait until Saturday as Friday's forecast is for heavy rain.

Attached is a picture Mark sent me to let me know my bike was ready. I'll take some pictures of my own during the day when the light is better.

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Old 01-31-19, 09:12 PM
  #32  
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Awesome, enjoy.
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Old 02-01-19, 06:50 PM
  #33  
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Ride the Ferrari, er... Colnago, for a while and see how it is getting on/off the machine. If it is OK, then venture into a touring bike if desired. If it is bothersome, then consider a step through frame. Bike Friday does the job, but my preference is for larger diameter wheels, specifically 700c.
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Old 02-01-19, 07:14 PM
  #34  
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You can, of course, tour on your Colnago, and call it a "Touring Bike" like most people describe all Steel bikes on Craigslist.



You may choose a slightly larger cassette/freewheel if you do venture out on loaded tours with any significant hills. Long cage rear derailleur?
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Old 02-02-19, 08:30 AM
  #35  
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Originally Posted by Midway View Post
I picked up my Colnago...Attached is a picture...
'Aero' handlebar stems like that were popular for a few years back in the day. From the https://www.sheldonbrown.com/handsup... Brown website:
'Also beware of any stem which has the handlebar clamp bolt behind the handlebar. These stems look superficially as sturdy as other stems, but in fact only half the height of the stem extension is carrying the load -- and there is a hole through it for the bolt. The stem shown below failed catastrophically, resulting in serious injury to the cyclist.'
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Old 02-02-19, 08:37 AM
  #36  
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Originally Posted by Steve B. View Post
If you want V's or canti's, sure you have flexibility in frame and fork clearance.
Hey, if somebody wants to name their kid 'Disk Break' it's fine by me, but here are 37s under calipers with a fair amount of room to spare:

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Old 02-03-19, 12:12 AM
  #37  
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It is quite possible to mount wide tires under caliper brakes. The short reach brakes (39-49mm) that are on most road bikes made in the last few decades are good for up to maybe 28mm tires. Mid reach brakes (47-57mm), like the Tektros that were on my Salsa Casseroll and the Paul Racer Mediums on my custom Zukas frame, can handle up to about 38mm wide tires. Long reach brakes (57-72mm) can handle up to maybe 45mm or so.

Problem is, the frame and fork have to be built to fit one of these standards. You can't juts put mid reach brakes on a bike made for short reach, the pads won't be in the right place for the rims. That's where disc brakes have a fit advantage. Disc brakes don't know or care what size rims and tires are on the bike. Whatever will fit within the frame and fork will work. Same for diameter. Want to change from 700c wheels to 650B wheels? Disc brakes couldn't care less. If the tire will fit in the frame or fork, the brake will work. Try that with rim brakes and you'll run into lots of problems.
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Old 02-03-19, 10:42 AM
  #38  
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I don't think there's any single right answer to these kinds of questions. So much is individual, whether it's fitness level, health issues, desired riding goals and style, terrain, riding partners, and simply what will make someone happy... Personally though, if you're not competing or trying to stay with someone else who's super fit on *their* high performance bike, I think you can ride more comfortably and enjoyably (and still pretty fast and far) on a bike that's less high-strung, and certainly you'll still get all the health benefits. Wider tires for example, are still quite low in rolling resistance as long as they have a smooth, rounded tread - near slicks... they'll be heavier, but you really only feel that when accelerating, not so much when you're cruising at speed. In addition to touring bikes, you might also look at fitness bikes, gravel bikes and hybrid bikes. You can do some research now to narrow down the field and take some test rides when the weather gets friendlier :-)
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Old 02-03-19, 11:32 AM
  #39  
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Originally Posted by Midway View Post
I picked up my Colnago from Tight Bike who did the tune-up tonight and it looks beautiful. I can't wait to take it for a spin but may wait until Saturday as Friday's forecast is for heavy rain.

Attached is a picture Mark sent me to let me know my bike was ready. I'll take some pictures of my own during the day when the light is better.


Being on the north side of 60 myself..I'd ride the 'Nago until it was clearly no longer works for you. 60-plus "upgrades" might be 28mm tires (I run panaracer gravel-king slicks..measure about 27mm) and a rear cassette that tops out at 26 or 28 teeth...might come in handy and it may make your gear selection a little more user-friendly.
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Old 02-03-19, 12:28 PM
  #40  
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Originally Posted by tcs View Post
'Aero' handlebar stems like that were popular for a few years back in the day. From the https://www.sheldonbrown.com/handsup... Brown website:
'Also beware of any stem which has the handlebar clamp bolt behind the handlebar. These stems look superficially as sturdy as other stems, but in fact only half the height of the stem extension is carrying the load -- and there is a hole through it for the bolt. The stem shown below failed catastrophically, resulting in serious injury to the cyclist.'
The link isn't working for me but you have raised a red flag. I wouldn't want a catastrophic failure. I've always wanted to upgrade to a proper Italian group set for a classic Italian frame. The handlebar alone is a stretch but I am always looking for excuses to spend money recklessly.

I took the bike out for the first time in 15 years yesterday although just up and down the street a few times and it felt great. I'll need to practice clipping in and out a few times so I don't fall and mess up my new hip and improve my flexibility. Stepping over the seat isn't easy. I plan on keeping the Colnago but may add a second endurance style bike and still be behind most on this forum.
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Old 02-04-19, 06:54 AM
  #41  
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Originally Posted by tcs View Post
Hey, if somebody wants to name their kid 'Disk Break' it's fine by me, but here are 37s under calipers with a fair amount of room to spare:

Those Tektro 559's are a great product for providing clearance around larger tires and fenders on frames/forks not originally intended for such. And the quality of the braking action is comparable to the short-reach 105's I have on another bike - no noticeable flex despite the long reach of the 559's.

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Old 02-14-19, 05:22 PM
  #42  
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I have decided to do both, keep my Colanago for its sentimental value and the fact it is a blast to ride and get an Endurance Bike to get me back in shape and be more comfortable on longer rides.

I just was notified the 2018 closeout Cannondale Synapse I ordered came in today and if I can free up my schedule, I will pick it up Saturday.

I am looking forward to the 50/34 - 11/30 gearing to help me getting up my hill. Now I need the snow to melt.

Thanks everyone for all the input.
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Old 02-16-19, 07:09 PM
  #43  
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My wife will hate the poor light iPhone picture but she is still my favorite bike stand. I made it to the bike store and picked up my new Synapse today. Can't wait to ride it.

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Old 02-16-19, 07:36 PM
  #44  
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That looks like a fun bike! Enjoy
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Old 02-21-19, 11:52 AM
  #45  
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Stay with racing frame or move to touring

I moved to an endurance frame and didn't like it; it didn't have the snap and handling I like for group rides. But what I did do was go to 700x25 tires and am now experimenting with 700x28's. The Colnago should accept 700x25's so I would try that.
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Old 02-21-19, 02:52 PM
  #46  
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I don't think I'll have a problem riding the Colnago once I learn to ride again. I've got it all tuned up and have ridden around the neighborhood and it feels great. I took the Synapse out on a bike trail for the first time today and boy am I out of practice after 15 plus years. It was a cool but beautiful day in the Seattle area for a ride and most of the snow is gone. Getting used to new Shimano style pedals caught me once while at a stop and the shifting and components will take some getting used to. It felt so good to be out on a bike again.

It is nice to have options with both bikes and it may be awhile before I find myself in a drafting line.

Thanks.
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Old 02-22-19, 09:54 AM
  #47  
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Midway - Two years ago I was following same train of thought. Ended up with mtn bike for casual rides. My Zenetto is also "twitchy" - but that only seems to be a problem when I am on aero bars - I just need more space around me. Your new bike looks great but I bet your old faithful will get the most miles.
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Old 02-28-19, 11:22 PM
  #48  
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Well, since your asking...... your not new to bikes, your road bike there is not your everyday run of the mill bike. I have a few years till 60, but I threw in the towel some time back. My recommendation would be something comfortable and that's something only you can decide. I could say 1 bike for each day of the week, or a bike for each mood. A fast bike or a leisurely riding bike, or off road. When I say threw in the towel it means making it comfortable. The comment about step through is a great thing to consider. Pretty much all my bikes are setup for a sitting up position. Even my old road bottecchia road bike is set up that way. Stems are all higher with swept back bars. To make something like that to work though involves the riser quill stem, angle and length of the clamp stem, shifters and brake levers and the configuration / shape of the bar, and then lengthing of all the cables and housing as they will probably be short. When that "sweet" is found you will know.

I also make my bikes able to do some basic work, carrying a lock in a bag plus some other stuff, coffee cup holder... I like small front racks and a smaller basket to make that all happen. I've found some low profile baskets that I like that are sold as cooler baskets. Yeti, and other rotomolded coolers have 3" high baskets that work great. REI sells them as an accessory then you add a rack you like.

some things to think about.

That's my .02
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Old 03-08-19, 06:40 AM
  #49  
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Originally Posted by Midway View Post

I am concerned the frame is a bit too twitchy for me. I don’t plan on much racing and my bike seemed a bit too responsive even 20 years ago. I plan on asking the bike shop to check my set up, seat and handlebar configuration etc.

It is a Colnago Master PIU with an Ultegra group set. It is still in great shape and I plan on giving it some miles but wonder if it would be more enjoyable to lean more towards a touring style bike?
Isn't twitchy closely related to the frame geometry? Short wheelbase. But your bike isn't that right? Must be something else that makes you think its twitchy.
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Old 03-08-19, 10:35 AM
  #50  
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Originally Posted by Garfield Cat View Post
Isn't twitchy closely related to the frame geometry? Short wheelbase. But your bike isn't that right? Must be something else that makes you think its twitchy.
I think you are on to something. I was always led to believe the Colnago Master Piu had a relatively short wheelbase but whether it does or not, I was beginning to think it could be something else. I seem to have more weight on my hands then I would like and I'm finding that can magnify some of the twitchyness I feel. I plan on getting some time on my bikes while building up core fitness and then checking my bike setup and go from there. Thanks.
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