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Before I slather this stuff all over another bike...

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Before I slather this stuff all over another bike...

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Old 02-19-19, 10:04 PM
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BikeTales
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Before I slather this stuff all over another bike...

A few years ago I bought a tub of grease at the hardware store...

I've been using this grease for any bike work I've done, on my own bikes and on some flips. Lubing bolts, screws, wheel bearings, headset bearings, stem quills, seat posts, brake cables, you get the picture.

It's called LubriMatic High Temperature Disc/Drum Brake Wheel Bearing Grease. Base type: Polyurea

Should I keep on keepin' on with this stuff or what? I'm leaning towards "It's fine".
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Old 02-19-19, 10:12 PM
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AnkleWork
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Originally Posted by BikeTales View Post
A few years ago I bought a tub of grease at the hardware store...

I've been using this grease for any bike work I've done, on my own bikes and on some flips. Lubing bolts, screws, wheel bearings, headset bearings, stem quills, seat posts, brake cables, you get the picture.

It's called LubriMatic High Temperature Disc/Drum Brake Wheel Bearing Grease. Base type: Polyurea

Should I keep on keepin' on with this stuff or what? I'm leaning towards "It's fine".
What prompts the question now, after years of use? What would you use instead?
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Old 02-19-19, 10:16 PM
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probably excessive but bikes don't get hub bearings hot like cars may..
I use grease for boat trailer hubs for its water Resistance excess.
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Old 02-19-19, 10:17 PM
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Bicycles are a very low demand application so almost any grease is useable and most are more than satisfactory. The type you are using is just fine. As above, has it done anything bad in the years you've been using it? I thought not.
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Old 02-19-19, 10:25 PM
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Originally Posted by HillRider View Post
Bicycles are a very low demand application so almost any grease is useable and most are more than satisfactory. The type you are using is just fine. As above, has it done anything bad in the years you've been using it? I thought not.
Yeah that's what I figured as well. I feel like I've read articles about maintenance that say to use a BICYCLE OIL/GREASE AND NOTHING ELSE!!! But maybe it was more about the chain lubrication and warning against using WD40 or something. That would make sense.
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Old 02-19-19, 11:16 PM
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I was just thinking about grease today.
Was tidying up the garage and tossing away stuff...and saw this tube of engine assembly grease. I bet it would make good because it is lower viscosity. The typical car wheel bearing grease feels too thick for optium performance on low temp application. marine greases is even thicker. Lighter grease seems like good idea.

I was going to toss it in the trash...but wat y'all think? Can I use engine assembly grease on the wheel bearing of bicycles?

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Old 02-20-19, 02:57 AM
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Originally Posted by mtb_addict View Post
I was just thinking about grease today.
Was tidying up the garage and tossing away stuff...and saw this tube of engine assembly grease. I bet it would make good because it is lower viscosity. The typical car wheel bearing grease feels too thick for optium performance on low temp application. marine greases is even thicker. Lighter grease seems like good idea.

I was going to toss it in the trash...but wat y'all think? Can I use engine assembly grease on the wheel bearing of bicycles?
Nahh, it's too thin, it'll drip out. I made some grease that was pastier than assembly lube. It dripped out.
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Old 02-20-19, 07:35 AM
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Automotive disc/drum grease is a kinda heavy for bicycles, might make you work a bit harder on the flats, but really is just fine. However, after you finish the tub in like year 2054, i would switch to basic lithium grease if you don't want to buy a tube of Phil (or other esoteric brand) of grease.
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Old 02-20-19, 07:52 AM
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I've always splurged (wasted money?) and used Phil's grease on my bikes. However, I buy it in 640 gm (22.5 oz) tubs so the cost per ounce is much lower than buying it in 3 oz tubes. I use a Dualco refillable mini-grease gun to dispense it and to keep the grease in the big container clean.

It does work well and I have hubs with well over 50,000 miles on them still using the original cones. Is it necessary to use "bicycle specific" grease? Of course not but it does work.
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Old 02-20-19, 08:00 AM
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sounds like it would be good on truck leaf springs
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Old 02-20-19, 09:27 AM
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Originally Posted by HillRider View Post
I've always splurged (wasted money?) and used Phil's grease on my bikes. However, I buy it in 640 gm (22.5 oz) tubs so the cost per ounce is much lower than buying it in 3 oz tubes. I use a Dualco refillable mini-grease gun to dispense it and to keep the grease in the big container clean.

It does work well and I have hubs with well over 50,000 miles on them still using the original cones. Is it necessary to use "bicycle specific" grease? Of course not but it does work.
Yeah...we use so little grease...why not buy the good stuff made specificially for bicycle. Why risk it if axle grease...brake grease, white grease...boat grease...whatever.
If you do the math the cost of "expensive" Phil's grease is like probably 0.001% of the overall cost of bicycling in a cyclist's life time.
It's no brainer to me to buy the good bicycle grease.
But I just happen to have a tube of axle grease sitting around unused from my trailer-hauling days...so I didn't want to waste it...so I just use it...I might have to buy new grease soon though...I am afraid I might have contaminated the tube last time. So...I think I need to use tubes next time...less likely to premature contamination. And definitely a bicycle specific grease.
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Old 02-20-19, 11:28 AM
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Originally Posted by mtb_addict View Post
Yeah...we use so little grease...why not buy the good stuff made specificially for bicycle. Why risk it if axle grease...brake grease, white grease...boat grease...whatever.
If you do the math the cost of "expensive" Phil's grease is like probably 0.001% of the overall cost of bicycling in a cyclist's life time.
It's no brainer to me to buy the good bicycle grease.
But I just happen to have a tube of axle grease sitting around unused from my trailer-hauling days...so I didn't want to waste it...so I just use it...I might have to buy new grease soon though...I am afraid I might have contaminated the tube last time. So...I think I need to use tubes next time...less likely to premature contamination. And definitely a bicycle specific grease.
And marketing jive triumphs again! (You just gave a sales wonk a spontaneous orgasm.) Phil's is just repackaged industrial grease with a boutique mark-up. BTW, what "risk" exactly?
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Old 02-20-19, 12:10 PM
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Originally Posted by AnkleWork View Post
And marketing jive triumphs again! (You just gave a sales wonk a spontaneous orgasm.) Phil's is just repackaged industrial grease with a boutique mark-up. BTW, what "risk" exactly?
My sister's bike sat in the garage for 2 years...I pulled the bearings out...and the old grease was hard like crayons.

Using the best grease, ought to max performa and minimize maintenance.
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Old 02-20-19, 12:27 PM
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Grease is oil with a thickening agent called a soap. The soaps may be based on most light metals such as lithium, aluminum, sodium, and calcium. The most "fibrous" of these is aluminum based grease, which is good for sliding applications. It is very water resistant but should never be used in rolling element bearings. The most common and versatile are greases based on lithium soaps. They feature excellent resistance to moisture and flowability for rolling element bearings. They handle heat well and resist thickening with age.

The best greases for most purposes are lithium based and contain molybenum disulphide. Molybdenum disulphide has the property of adhering to ferrous metals the extent that it requires machining to remove it. It continues to provide lubricity afte the grease is gone, as in washed away by solvent for a sort time.

Grease should be specified by NLGI grade, with or without the Moly additive.
https://www.practicalmachinist.com/v...grease-171568/
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Old 02-20-19, 12:39 PM
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Some people would put oil in their hub and bottom brackets bearings to save a watt or two on race day, so I don't see the problem with trying a thinner grease. You'll probably just have to replace it sooner.

Also, some hub manufactures -- Chris King, DT Swiss, others -- specify a certain type of grease for their ratchets or ring drive systems.

As far as I can tell, Phil or Park greases are just common greases with a little rust inhibitor, but arguments that some lubricants perform a given task better than others seem valid, not totally marketing BS. Some grease hardens over time, etc. S & S Couplings did a test for thread galling, and endorsed a teflon based grease based on a specific test where they basically pinched a nut and ran a bolt through it again and again until it broke.
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Old 02-20-19, 12:46 PM
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Originally Posted by mtb_addict View Post
My sister's bike sat in the garage for 2 years...I pulled the bearings out...and the old grease was hard like crayons.

Using the best grease, ought to max performa and minimize maintenance.
So do you think there's anything between best and worst? Just mediocre grease will "max performa and minimize maintenance." BTW, price does not indicate "best" and how else can you tell the difference? (apparently only by marketing claims). Cheap mediocre automotive grease will not harden like "crayons."

Black/white thinking gets further from the truth -- bonus: it costs more than truth.
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Old 02-20-19, 02:22 PM
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Originally Posted by BikeTales View Post
Should I keep on keepin' on with this stuff or what?
It probably isn't going to hurt anything but keep in mind that certain jobs and parts require specific lubricants. For example, bottom brackets often specify anti-seize rather than grease.

Sticking to what the parts manufacturer recommends is typically a safe bet.


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Old 02-20-19, 05:56 PM
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I bought a tube of Phil grease about 30 years ago and I'm still using it. I obviously don't use much.
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Old 02-20-19, 11:18 PM
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Low viscosity

Originally Posted by Steelman54 View Post
Automotive disc/drum grease is a kinda heavy for bicycles, might make you work a bit harder on the flats, but really is just fine. However, after you finish the tub in like year 2054, i would switch to basic lithium grease if you don't want to buy a tube of Phil (or other esoteric brand) of grease.
Man, if the viscosity of the grease affects your speed you got one finely tuned pair of legs my friend.😁
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Old 02-21-19, 09:03 AM
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Here's an excellent (and long) explanation of greases by forum member Slaninar. https://bike.bikegremlin.com/1985/bi...ase-explained/
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Old 02-21-19, 07:16 PM
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]Man, if the viscosity of the grease affects your speed you got one finely tuned pair of legs my friend.😁

Ha, nothing I would feel, but on the other hand I need every bit of power I can get, laughing hard.
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Old 02-22-19, 07:31 AM
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The main downside IMO is the potential incompatibility of the polyurea base with other greases (which are mostly not urea based). I learned this lesson the hard way after trying out Park Tools grease, which has the same base.
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Old 02-25-19, 10:58 AM
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I am using park tools PPL-1, but some people think it is not very waterproof.
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Old 02-26-19, 08:06 AM
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Originally Posted by fietsbob View Post
I use grease for boat trailer hubs for its water Resistance excess.
+1
Green LubriMatic boat trailer bearing grease is the way to go!
I don't know the NLGI number for it, but it seems a little softer than some other greases I've seen - I think it's ideal.
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Old 02-26-19, 10:12 AM
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At the Bike Exchange we use tubs of lithium grease for all our donation bikes . Have been doing it for 25 years.

Personally, I buy lithium grease in a squeeze tube. It prevents contamination and makes squirting grease into wheel bearing cups, head set and bottom bracket cups a snap. I have been rehabbing a lot of bikes lately and go through a tube maybe every 4-5 months. No big deal.

Also the tube fits in the top shelf of my 3 drawer tool box that I like to bring with me to the Exchange when I work there. Nice to have everything close at hand so I don't have to go over to the tool cart every time I need something.
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