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Noticeable downside to 32mm over narrower tire

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Noticeable downside to 32mm over narrower tire

Old 03-03-20, 01:02 AM
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surak
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Noticeable downside to 32mm over narrower tire

I've a good problem to have: there's plenty of room to fit the larger Bontrager NCS fenders on my new rain bike, but they make my 25mm tires look puny. My commute is 15+ miles one-way with only a few bumpy stretches, so I've always preferred to run reasonably fast and supple 25 or 28mm (nominal) width tires. As a lightweight, I don't need anything larger than 28mm for comfort, but I'm kicking around the idea of trying 30-32mm and tubeless for the first time to reduce both puncture and pinch flats while providing even more secure feeling in wetter weather. Other than the wider tires being heavier, are there other reasons to not size up, like being noticeably slower?
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Old 03-03-20, 04:45 AM
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I run 32mm pirelli cinturatos on my winter bike. While I am slower in the winter, it's not strictly down to just tyres. Bike geometry, weather, and road conditions all play a part in it (moreso than tyre IMHO). I have a 16 mile commute, and it adds around 5 minutes to my commute time over my summer bike. Some of it is also due to my winter bike just doesn't have the same feel as my summer bike (CX vs aero), so it's not as fun to ride (on the road. trails and gravel it's great fun).
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Old 03-03-20, 07:11 AM
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I rode yesterday on 27 x 1 1/4" (~32mm) Paselas. Admittedly, I had a tailwind. The bike was flying, maybe 23 mph steady on the flats. I don't think that the tires would slow you down one bit, if you have them at the right inflation for your weight.
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Old 03-03-20, 07:24 AM
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I've got 38's on my steel commute. It feels sluggish compared to my three-season commute, which has 25's, but that may be that the bike itself is much heavier, and I'm often riding it in lousy weather, and often dressed in thicker layers. Other than that there's no difference.
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Old 03-03-20, 10:02 AM
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The only downside to 32s over 28s is that many (though not all) models get noticeably stiffer and heavier going to the wider size. If you get a tire that doesn't have such a "feature" you probably won't notice the difference. Something like the Continental GP 5000 or Compass Stampede Pass come to mind as light, flexible models. Still have 1,500 miles on my Contis to tell if they wear as well as heavier Gatorskins...
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Old 03-03-20, 10:10 AM
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What you give up in a little weight you'll get back in lower rolling resistance. Have fun!
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Old 03-03-20, 10:36 AM
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Originally Posted by surak View Post
...like being noticeably slower?
A heavier tire may slow you down slightly, but as davei1980 pointed out it may yield less rolling resistance. My experience is bigger tires at lower inflation feel slower due to more cushioning and dampened road "chatter". The speedometer/computer and gps have shown some of my bigger, cushier tires to be faster than the harder, skinnier tires they replaced. YMMV
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Old 03-03-20, 10:44 AM
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Originally Posted by BobbyG View Post
A heavier tire may slow you down slightly, but as davei1980 pointed out it may yield less rolling resistance. My experience is bigger tires at lower inflation feel slower due to more cushioning and dampened road "chatter". The speedometer/computer and gps have shown some of my bigger, cushier tires to be faster than the harder, skinnier tires they replaced. YMMV
You're correct in that they may not feel snappy because you don't feel every crackseal in the road, and the only thing you're giving up speed-wise is they don't spin up as quickly so they're not as good at sprinting, usually not a major concern for city riding
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Old 03-03-20, 12:23 PM
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My main commuter bike has a 3" front and 2.8" rear... so I say go for it
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Old 03-03-20, 01:08 PM
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Originally Posted by Darth Lefty View Post
My main commuter bike has a 3" front and 2.8" rear... so I say go for it
29x3.0 front and rear for me!! Works great, especially in the dark if I hit a stick or another object I can't see well.

Hitting a pinecone on my track bike commuter was a terrifying experience sometimes! No more!
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Old 03-03-20, 02:45 PM
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The tire itself may be heavier but the goop you put in your tubeless is less weight than a tube, so you'll probably be gaining less weight than you'd imagine.
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Old 03-03-20, 02:52 PM
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maybe switch to black fenders & they won't look so big?
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Old 03-03-20, 02:57 PM
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It depends on the tire. Many (most) wider tires are designed for commuter or city use, and have thicker treads and flat resistant layers, which make a tire slower. If you could find the exact same tire at 32mm that you use at 25mm then the 32mm tire will roll a bit faster. If you go from a 25mm silk casing racing tire to a 32mm Specialized Armadillo or Continental Gator Hardshell, your bike will almost definitely be noticeably slower.
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Old 03-04-20, 03:02 PM
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I'm riding 26 x 2" cruiser tires on my converted mtb. with low pressure and they ride great!
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Old 03-04-20, 04:03 PM
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I like 32mm tires. Wider is faster, all things being equal. But all things are never equal. A wider tire of the same construction is heavier. Still, you can get lightweight sidewall tires in 32mm, and you'll be glad if you do.

I don't have experience with tubeless. It sounds like too much trouble for too little gain.
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Old 03-04-20, 09:49 PM
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Originally Posted by noglider View Post
I like 32mm tires. Wider is faster, all things being equal. But all things are never equal. A wider tire of the same construction is heavier. Still, you can get lightweight sidewall tires in 32mm, and you'll be glad if you do.

I don't have experience with tubeless. It sounds like too much trouble for too little gain.
my son the mechanic agrees with you.

Like 32s as well even 35s
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Old 03-05-20, 09:59 AM
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Originally Posted by noglider View Post

I don't have experience with tubeless. It sounds like too much trouble for too little gain.
Come to the dark side Tom!! You know you want to!
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Old 03-05-20, 05:19 PM
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Originally Posted by noglider View Post
I don't have experience with tubeless. It sounds like too much trouble for too little gain.
Depends on the gain. For my commute distance the time savings from lower rolling resistance, comfort of running lower pressure without pinch flats, and reduced chance of having to fix a flat in crappy weather (the expected type, as this is after all for a rain bike) are appealing. The potential amount of faffing around to seat tubeless is not off-putting enough for me to rule it out. I think I'd rather try tubeless than latex inner tubes, which doesn't seem to get nearly the same amount of skepticism.
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Old 03-05-20, 06:36 PM
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Always ride the widest, lowest-pressure, most supple tires you can. That last one might be the most significant factor (but also drives up price)

CyclingTips Podcast, Episode 9: Rethinking road bike tire sizes and pressures | CyclingTips

My Surly CrossCheck is wearing Schwalbe Hurricanes; not terribly supple perhaps (they're no Marathon Supremes), but 700x50 in the back and 700x42 in the front. I check the pressure every day by riding over the steel triangular bar that the parking lot gate at work rolls on. When they get too low, I find they're down around 15-20psi, so I air them 'up' to 30.

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Old 03-06-20, 01:14 PM
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Originally Posted by RubeRad View Post
Always ride the widest, lowest-pressure, most supple tires you can. That last one might be the most significant factor (but also drives up price)

CyclingTips Podcast, Episode 9: Rethinking road bike tire sizes and pressures | CyclingTips

My Surly CrossCheck is wearing Schwalbe Hurricanes; not terribly supple perhaps (they're no Marathon Supremes), but 700x50 in the back and 700x42 in the front. I check the pressure every day by riding over the steel triangular bar that the parking lot gate at work rolls on. When they get too low, I find they're down around 15-20psi, so I air them 'up' to 30.
+1!
I commute on 29x3.0" Vee Rubber Tee Fattys aired "UP" to 9.5 PSI in the front and 10.75 PSI in the rear. Not good for standing up and srpinting but awesome for everything else, including hi-speed cornering in bike lanes where gravel, broken glass, and other debris are common.

If I hit a trail on the weekend I can go as low as 6-7 PSI in the front but only on trails, at that pressure, there's SO MUCH traction on pavement the 'self steer' which these tires are known for is pronounced.
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Old 03-07-20, 02:20 PM
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I'm riding 32-mm slicks on my commuter. I haven't made the switch to tubeless yet, although I've considered it. Anyhow, I recommend getting fat.

Riding over patchy pavement as I do, having a larger air volume and being able to run lower pressure is really nice. If anything, I've been in the habit of running high pressure for so long that I can't get used to running pressures as low as my tires will allow.
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Old 03-07-20, 02:29 PM
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I use 32mm Continental Grand Prix 4 Season tires on my commuter/hybrid. I really trust them; I had only one flat last year with these tires, they are durable, and they handle the road's diverse conditions well.

I use 28mm Continental Grand Prix 5000 tires on my road bike. The ride is very slightly rougher. They are nice, fast tires.

For a commuter I wouldn't hesitate to put 32mm GP4Season tires on again.
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Old 03-09-20, 10:04 AM
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Originally Posted by adamrice View Post
Anyhow, I recommend getting fat.
I have already done that. But what tires should I get?
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Old 03-09-20, 10:17 AM
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Originally Posted by RubeRad View Post
I have already done that. But what tires should I get?
The Conti GP 4000 4-seasons mentioned elsewhere in this thread are a good bet. I put the new GP 5000s on my commuter, based on their purportedly good flat resistance. They haven't been quite as flat-resistant as I'd like, although they are very nice to ride on.
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Old 03-09-20, 10:34 AM
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u missed the joke
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