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Gugificazione Raleigh Super Tourer build thread

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Gugificazione Raleigh Super Tourer build thread

Old 01-01-18, 12:23 PM
  #51  
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I really dig those small rear racks. Just large enough to carry a rain suit and walking shoes.
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Old 01-01-18, 12:29 PM
  #52  
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Originally Posted by gugie View Post
More pix:

Schmidt spade connectors are tight. Real tight. As in, you're changing a flat and it's cold, you're tired, and hard to reconnect. Mini banana plugs are easy on and off, yet are very secure. @southpawboston coached me up on this trick. Crimp the banana plug to the spade, add heat shrink, voila.

It's been obvious for quite a while that Schmidt's tabs aren't at all friendly to on-the-road repairs. I've added a pigtail with more user-friendly connector pins to permit easy disconnects, but Anton's scheme is quite nice! I may have to "borrow" that sometime!

Regarding the rest of the work, boy, I'm impressed! A fellow might even get the impression that the racks take more time to build than a regular frame. So many joints to be brazed!

Thanks for sharing!


Steve in Peoria
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Old 01-01-18, 12:53 PM
  #53  
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Beauty!! Love the way this bike is coming together. That tail light is sweet!
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Old 01-01-18, 04:58 PM
  #54  
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Very cool project! I have to stop reading your threads, they are dangerously inspiring.

Was the M3 bolt necessary? Don't most dynamo hubs ground through the axle? I know the old Sturmey Archer ones don't, but others (and I think that's all the others I've tested) do.
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Old 01-01-18, 08:29 PM
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Originally Posted by rhm View Post
Very cool project! I have to stop reading your threads, they are dangerously inspiring.

Was the M3 bolt necessary? Don't most dynamo hubs ground through the axle? I know the old Sturmey Archer ones don't, but others (and I think that's all the others I've tested) do.
The only hubs that I know that ground through the axle are the inexpensive Sanyo and the Schmidt SL. Complicating things are the rear tail light (if used). Some ground through the frame, others do not.
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Last edited by gugie; 01-04-18 at 02:59 PM.
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Old 01-02-18, 12:25 AM
  #56  
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Originally Posted by steelbikeguy View Post
It's been obvious for quite a while that Schmidt's tabs aren't at all friendly to on-the-road repairs. I've added a pigtail with more user-friendly connector pins to permit easy disconnects, but Anton's scheme is quite nice! I may have to "borrow" that sometime!

Regarding the rest of the work, boy, I'm impressed! A fellow might even get the impression that the racks take more time to build than a regular frame. So many joints to be brazed!

Thanks for sharing!


Steve in Peoria
Thanks for the kind words, Steve!

Here's my step by step pictorial.

Racks do take some time, but actual torch time, total on one rack is no more than 10 minutes. Bending and cutting tubing doesn't take much time. Mitering exactly where you want the tube to fit to takes a bit. Figuring out how to jig something you've never done before takes a goodly amount of time. Until you've got that first tack down, it's a house of cards. Defluxing is done in a hot water, ultrasonic bath, so that's just dumping it in the tank and hitting a button, then taking a bio or snack break. What seems to really take time is filing and sanding it all smooth to what appears to be an organic shape.
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Old 01-02-18, 06:49 AM
  #57  
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The front rack looks fantastic. Would you care to share the supplier of your tubing?
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Old 01-02-18, 08:35 AM
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Lots of planning before the execution evident.
My question is the frame set was stated to have 8 cm of drop, with the 650b tires of the chosen cross section, what is the bottom bracket height Now?
No argument that the bigger drop helps handling, just wondering how the cornering clearance ends up.
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Old 01-02-18, 09:51 AM
  #59  
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Originally Posted by repechage View Post
Lots of planning before the execution evident.
My question is the frame set was stated to have 8 cm of drop, with the 650b tires of the chosen cross section, what is the bottom bracket height Now?
No argument that the bigger drop helps handling, just wondering how the cornering clearance ends up.

No idea, it would depend on what the original spec tires were.

From my experience with this vintage of Raleigh Super Tourer/Competition (essentially the same geometry) it is "adequate". I've never experienced pedal strike.
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Old 01-02-18, 10:08 AM
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Originally Posted by 4funbikes View Post
The front rack looks fantastic. Would you care to share the supplier of your tubing?
Round, CrMo tubing is a commodity. Aircraft Spruce has good prices for the small quantities I buy. McMaster-Carr is another good source. There are others, but that's where I go for tubing. I typically use 5/16" .035 tubing, sometimes .028 for light use racks. I've made a few 1/4" front racks for handlebar bags as well.

For those wanting to try their hand at brazing, racks are a good place to start.
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Old 01-02-18, 06:56 PM
  #61  
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Originally Posted by gugie View Post
No idea, it would depend on what the original spec tires were.

From my experience with this vintage of Raleigh Super Tourer/Competition (essentially the same geometry) it is "adequate". I've never experienced pedal strike.

I've been running BSP 42mm tires on my Super Tourer conversion with 170mm cranks. I have experienced pedal strike a few times. Since then, I've tried not to pedal through tight turns. Works fine that way.
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Old 01-03-18, 11:32 AM
  #62  
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Originally Posted by gugie View Post
Round, CrMo tubing is a commodity. Aircraft Spruce has good prices for the small quantities I buy. McMaster-Carr is another good source. There are others, but that's where I go for tubing. I typically use 5/16" .035 tubing, sometimes .028 for light use racks. I've made a few 1/4" front racks for handlebar bags as well.

For those wanting to try their hand at brazing, racks are a good place to start.


It has been a while since I have done any brazing. I have a oxy-acetylene torch that I have used for welding/brazing, I always like the way brazing comes out. It would be fun to try to build a rack. Hmmm...
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Old 01-03-18, 12:05 PM
  #63  
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Originally Posted by CountryBiking View Post
It has been a while since I have done any brazing. I have a oxy-acetylene torch that I have used for welding/brazing, I always like the way brazing comes out. It would be fun to try to build a rack. Hmmm...
Just do it, man! If you have any detailed questions, PM me.
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Old 01-03-18, 05:02 PM
  #64  
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Originally Posted by bear_a_bug View Post
I've been running BSP 42mm tires on my Super Tourer conversion with 170mm cranks. I have experienced pedal strike a few times. Since then, I've tried not to pedal through tight turns. Works fine that way.
You've got your old tight turners, and you've got your bold tight turners, but no old, bold tight turners...

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Old 01-04-18, 06:40 AM
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^ Thank you for the tubing specs and source (in addition to everything else contributed). I've done a few braze-ons, and I think doing a simple rack is next on the agenda.
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Old 01-04-18, 03:07 PM
  #66  
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Originally Posted by 4funbikes View Post
^ Thank you for the tubing specs and source (in addition to everything else contributed). I've done a few braze-ons, and I think doing a simple rack is next on the agenda.
Please post pics when when you do!
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Old 01-04-18, 05:31 PM
  #67  
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Aw heck Gugie - I wish I lived near you, you're a great mentor.
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Old 01-04-18, 06:07 PM
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Originally Posted by bear_a_bug View Post
I've been running BSP 42mm tires on my Super Tourer conversion with 170mm cranks. I have experienced pedal strike a few times. Since then, I've tried not to pedal through tight turns. Works fine that way.
Maybe it's just me, but I feel like philosophically 650B bikes and pedaling through turns don't really go together anyway. If I'm riding my 650B bike, I'm going to be happy to coast now and again. Plus, I'll probably be going slow enough that I don't need to lean that much anyway. And now that I think about it, the gugie-signature low trail conversion probably also reduces one's tendency to lean the bike to extreme extents.
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Old 01-04-18, 06:36 PM
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Originally Posted by Andy_K View Post
Maybe it's just me, but I feel like philosophically 650B bikes and pedaling through turns don't really go together anyway. If I'm riding my 650B bike, I'm going to be happy to coast now and again. Plus, I'll probably be going slow enough that I don't need to lean that much anyway. And now that I think about it, the gugie-signature low trail conversion probably also reduces one's tendency to lean the bike to extreme extents.
But, but, but, but, fat tires make you go faster, right?

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Old 01-04-18, 06:38 PM
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Originally Posted by Andy_K View Post
Maybe it's just me, but I feel like philosophically 650B bikes and pedaling through turns don't really go together anyway. If I'm riding my 650B bike, I'm going to be happy to coast now and again. Plus, I'll probably be going slow enough that I don't need to lean that much anyway. And now that I think about it, the gugie-signature low trail conversion probably also reduces one's tendency to lean the bike to extreme extents.
Quoted in its entity only to illustrate my point: you, sir, are overthinking this. Shut down your computer. Get on your bike. Pedal. Steer. Don't think. All good.
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Old 01-04-18, 06:46 PM
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Originally Posted by rhm View Post
Quoted in its entity only to illustrate my point: you, sir, are overthinking this. Shut down your computer. Get on your bike. Pedal. Steer. Don't think. All good.
@Andy_K is probably stuck at work waiting for his compiler to compile, so he's stuck in front of his computer.

Which begs the question, Andy, how do you compile a compiler? Sounds like an endless loop...
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Old 01-04-18, 07:13 PM
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Originally Posted by gugie View Post
But, but, but, but, fat tires make you go faster, right?
Of course, they make you so much faster that you don't need to pedal through corners.


Originally Posted by rhm View Post
Quoted in its entity only to illustrate my point: you, sir, are overthinking this. Shut down your computer. Get on your bike. Pedal. Steer. Don't think. All good.
Overthinking things is what I do best.


Originally Posted by gugie View Post
@Andy_K is probably stuck at work waiting for his compiler to compile, so he's stuck in front of his computer.

Which begs the question, Andy, how do you compile a compiler? Sounds like an endless loop...
Sure the compiler compiles itself. It won't be long until it fixes its own bugs and I'll be out of work. Until then I am, in fact, stuck in front of my computer.
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Old 01-04-18, 07:38 PM
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Is the product of compiling called "a pile?"

Nice work gugie. Love that green color too.
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Old 01-26-18, 03:57 PM
  #74  
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@gugie I'm glad I stumbled across this thread, because it's hard to find someone with experience using Grand Bois hubs. I recently visited their shop in Kyoto and bought their small flange front hub. I rebuilt my front wheel with it, and it's great so far. In the near future (likely next year), I was planning to order the rear hub and rebuild my rear wheel to match.

What's your opinion of their rear hubs so far? Do they have an aluminum cassette hub body, or steel? Lastly, would you advise against using their aluminum-axle rear hub (small flange) for loaded touring?

Figured I'd strike while this build thread was still hot.
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Old 01-26-18, 04:28 PM
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Originally Posted by Scottybigs View Post
@gugie I'm glad I stumbled across this thread, because it's hard to find someone with experience using Grand Bois hubs. I recently visited their shop in Kyoto and bought their small flange front hub. I rebuilt my front wheel with it, and it's great so far. In the near future (likely next year), I was planning to order the rear hub and rebuild my rear wheel to match.

What's your opinion of their rear hubs so far? Do they have an aluminum cassette hub body, or steel? Lastly, would you advise against using their aluminum-axle rear hub (small flange) for loaded touring?

Figured I'd strike while this build thread was still hot.
I like them because the bearing shield is red, just like the Maxi-Car of old. It has an aluminum cassette hub body. It's just as good as a few other similar choices, except many freehubs now have a steel insert so the cogs don't dig into the body. This makes disassembly a lot easier - they're a pain to dislodge if the've dug into the aluminum body. Perhaps Grand Bois has added the steel insert as well?

If you're doing loaded touring, I'd suggest bringing a Stein lock ring tool in case you break a rear spoke.

I can't speak to the durability of an alum. axle vs steel. I really like the idea of the Velo Orange Grand Cru hub - it doesn't take any tools to disassemble. There were some reports on early models of freehubs failing. I don't know if they've fixed that, but it would be something to look into.
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