Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Bicycle Mechanics
Reload this Page >

2 questions about bike maintainence

Notices
Bicycle Mechanics Broken bottom bracket? Tacoed wheel? If you're having problems with your bicycle, or just need help fixing a flat, drop in here for the latest on bicycle mechanics & bicycle maintenance.

2 questions about bike maintainence

Old 03-07-20, 05:17 PM
  #1  
essiemyra
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Merrimac , MA
Posts: 1,042
Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 51 Post(s)
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
2 questions about bike maintainence

Hi,

My bike is an entry level specialized vita that is 9 years old. I typically ride about 2000 to 2500 miles a year between commuting to work and joy riding and local touring weekends.

I was told by my lbs that I need to replace my front wheel due to the bike rim being worn because the bike is 9 years old and the rim has a lot of wear. Is this a valid concern?

Also when replacing the rear cassette and chain how necessary is replacing the front chain-ring in making the drive-train run correctly, as the front chain-ring has not been changed in the 9 years I have owned the bike. My lbs is suggesting I do this. I want the bike to run as smooth as possible.

Let me say that I was in my lbs and asked them to change a flat tire and use the same brand and model tire I currently had on the bike. The mechanic said they did not have that particular tire. So he showed me another tire that was cheaper and I told him he could use it. While he was changing the the flat tire, I went and looked in the showroom and found the same tire that was on my bike. When I brought it back to show him and ask him if it was the one that was originally on my bike he said yes. I asked him to change out the two he had put on that were cheaper and give me the new but same tire brand and model that was originally on the bike and he did the work. I find it hard to believe that I could find the brand and model that I originally had and the mechanic could not. It makes me not trust him or the shop. That is why I am here asking the questions about what I was told at the lbs.

Thank-you in advance for any and all help.
essiemyra is offline  
Old 03-07-20, 05:47 PM
  #2  
3alarmer
Friendship is Magic
 
3alarmer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: The Big Tomato
Posts: 18,472

Bikes: old ones

Mentioned: 257 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 17815 Post(s)
Liked 1,477 Times in 1,095 Posts
.
...this sort of question comes up regularly here in the mechanics forum. There's no good answer.

Failure to find the tyre you found does not immediately mean the mechanic you talked to is either incompetent or untrustworthy.
Rims do wear out on the sidewalls after enough braking wear from the brake shoes, depending on conditions. When they get thin enough along the brake track, they can fail.
Chain rings do wear out, depending on how dirty your chain gets, your conditions, and how often you change the chain. If you ride regularly in the smaller ring, that's where you see the wear.

Neither of these problems is diagnosable over the internet, without some fairly detailed pictures.

IN general, there is a lot more worry and anxiety over getting ripped off by a mechanic than is warranted by the frequency of ripoffs. But I understand your concern. No one likes to be taken advantage of.
3alarmer is offline  
Old 03-07-20, 05:50 PM
  #3  
AnkleWork
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Llano Estacado
Posts: 3,702

Bikes: old clunker

Mentioned: 13 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 684 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 96 Times in 74 Posts
Why are you buying a tire just to fix a flat?
AnkleWork is offline  
Old 03-07-20, 06:07 PM
  #4  
essiemyra
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Merrimac , MA
Posts: 1,042
Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 51 Post(s)
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
3 alarmer, thank-you for answering my question. I am not really looking for diagnosis just if those are real valid issues. If they were I will have them fixed. But when I told a car mechanic that I trust( weird I know, but he is my brother). He did not seem to think they were problems that happened with bikes. I know can go show him yes they are.

Anklework, the reason for buying tires to fix a flat is the tires are a few years old and the mechanic was showing me the wear on the tires. Whether real or imagined wear, i changed both tires as I felt the tires were old enough and could use a new tire. I also got a new tube on the tire that was flat but re-used the tube on the tire that was not flat.
essiemyra is offline  
Old 03-07-20, 07:14 PM
  #5  
Bill Kapaun
Really Old Senior Member
 
Bill Kapaun's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Mid Willamette Valley, Orygun
Posts: 11,657

Bikes: 87 RockHopper,2008 Specialized Globe. Both upgraded to 9 speeds.

Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 989 Post(s)
Liked 209 Times in 164 Posts
The mechanic might have been a "back room" guy and not totally aware of their inventory. Simple ignorance vs malice.

Sometimes, the factory tires aren't the best tires for your specific use.
If you only ride on smooth pavement, a slightly smaller slick tire would roll easier and make the bike accelerate easier/quicker.
The Specialized Armadillo tires on my Globe were horrible. Their rolling resistance wasn't much better than knobbys.
Bill Kapaun is offline  
Old 03-07-20, 07:43 PM
  #6  
tFUnK
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: San Jose, CA
Posts: 2,671

Bikes: Too many bikes, too little time to ride

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 97 Post(s)
Liked 40 Times in 37 Posts
Nine years, at 2k miles (including the conditions of urban commuting) will cause normal wear to your rim's braking surface, the drivetrain (chainrings, chain, cassette), and tires. I'd say all those parts were due to be replaced. As for finding the original equipment tires, that's not a big deal. People often change out parts (including tires) to dial in the ride (eg, different stem length, bar widths, tires). I wouldn't be wary of this shop/mechanic based on the info provided.
tFUnK is offline  
Old 03-08-20, 12:01 AM
  #7  
sweeks
Senior Member
 
sweeks's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Chicago area
Posts: 1,421

Bikes: Airborne "Carpe Diem", Motobecane "Mirage", Trek 6000, Strida 2, Dahon "Helios XL", Dahon "Mu XL", Tern "Verge S11i"

Mentioned: 18 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 591 Post(s)
Liked 81 Times in 65 Posts
A little looking into the topic of "drivetrain wear" might be helpful. Start here: Sheldon Brown.
Sprockets will last a lot longer if the chain is replaced in a timely manner. See THIS. The smallest sprockets wear fastest, all else being equal, and the chainrings are generally the last to need replacement unless drivetrain mainteneance has been sorely neglected.
sweeks is offline  
Old 03-08-20, 12:18 AM
  #8  
Jeff Wills
Insane Bicycle Mechanic
 
Jeff Wills's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: other Vancouver
Posts: 9,289
Mentioned: 29 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 566 Post(s)
Liked 142 Times in 108 Posts
Originally Posted by essiemyra View Post
Hi,

I was told by my lbs that I need to replace my front wheel due to the bike rim being worn because the bike is 9 years old and the rim has a lot of wear. Is this a valid concern?

Thank-you in advance for any and all help.
Yes. Caliper brake wear on aluminum rims happens. If you don't replace the rim it can crack and the tire blow out. Modern rims have a "wear indicator" machined into the brake track. When the indicator disappears it's time to replace.

Years ago I had a well-worn rim explode as I was riding along. Fortunately I was riding at a mellow pace on a bike path. Still, I had to wait a couple hours for my wife to ride home and fetch the van.


__________________
Jeff Wills

Comcast nuked my web page. It will return soon..
Jeff Wills is offline  
Old 03-08-20, 06:28 AM
  #9  
sweeks
Senior Member
 
sweeks's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Chicago area
Posts: 1,421

Bikes: Airborne "Carpe Diem", Motobecane "Mirage", Trek 6000, Strida 2, Dahon "Helios XL", Dahon "Mu XL", Tern "Verge S11i"

Mentioned: 18 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 591 Post(s)
Liked 81 Times in 65 Posts
Originally Posted by Jeff Wills View Post
Yes. Caliper brake wear on aluminum rims happens. If you don't replace the rim it can crack and the tire blow out. Modern rims have a "wear indicator" machined into the brake track. When the indicator disappears it's time to replace.
I can verify this, as it's (nearly) happened to me several times on my commuter bike. Luckily, before the rim disintegrates it begins to expand in width at the weakest point and a distinct "thump" happens when the brake is applied. Close inspection will reveal the source of the thump, and immediate rim replacement is indicated.
In my experience, this always happens on the rear wheel... for reasons I don't fully understand, because I use the front brake more heavily than the rear. It certainly could happen on a front rim though.


Imminent rim separation; lateral view



Imminent rim separation; radial view... THUMP!



Can't say I wasn't warned!
sweeks is offline  
Old 03-08-20, 07:30 AM
  #10  
02Giant 
Home School Valedictorian
 
02Giant's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Iowa
Posts: 2,940

Bikes: 13 Orbea Orca 02 Giant Cypress 88 Mongoose ATB 79 frame-built to 80 spec. Schwinn Traveller

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1141 Post(s)
Liked 218 Times in 159 Posts
Originally Posted by essiemyra View Post
Hi,

My bike is an entry level specialized vita that is 9 years old. I typically ride about 2000 to 2500 miles a year between commuting to work and joy riding and local touring weekends.

I was told by my lbs that I need to replace my front wheel due to the bike rim being worn because the bike is 9 years old and the rim has a lot of wear. Is this a valid concern?

Also when replacing the rear cassette and chain how necessary is replacing the front chain-ring in making the drive-train run correctly, as the front chain-ring has not been changed in the 9 years I have owned the bike. My lbs is suggesting I do this. I want the bike to run as smooth as possible.

Let me say that I was in my lbs and asked them to change a flat tire and use the same brand and model tire I currently had on the bike. The mechanic said they did not have that particular tire. So he showed me another tire that was cheaper and I told him he could use it. While he was changing the the flat tire, I went and looked in the showroom and found the same tire that was on my bike. When I brought it back to show him and ask him if it was the one that was originally on my bike he said yes. I asked him to change out the two he had put on that were cheaper and give me the new but same tire brand and model that was originally on the bike and he did the work. I find it hard to believe that I could find the brand and model that I originally had and the mechanic could not. It makes me not trust him or the shop. That is why I am here asking the questions about what I was told at the lbs.

Thank-you in advance for any and all help.
Anything is possible. A few closeup pictures of the suspect parts posted to the forums will do more than guesses.
__________________
Elect a clown, you get a circus

I ain't broke and I ain't hungry but I'm close enough to care
tp


02Giant is offline  
Old 03-08-20, 07:31 AM
  #11  
essiemyra
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Merrimac , MA
Posts: 1,042
Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 51 Post(s)
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
thank-you sweeks, and jeffwillis, for the information about rim wear. I was thinking that it was a true thing but when I mentioned it to my mechanic brother he thought that it was not an issue I would have to worry about. I can now show him this thread and he can see for himself it is a very real concern. And not one I should take lightly.

Also sweeks thank-you for the information on the drive-train. It is very informative.

​​​​​​I appreciate everyone's information.
essiemyra is offline  
Likes For essiemyra:
Old 03-08-20, 08:00 AM
  #12  
Retro Grouch 
Senior Member
 
Retro Grouch's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: St Peters, Missouri
Posts: 29,816

Bikes: Catrike 559 I own some others but they don't get ridden very much.

Mentioned: 15 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1405 Post(s)
Liked 290 Times in 176 Posts
1. Feel your front rim's brake surface with your finger. If it feels noticeably convex it's time for a new one.
2. New chainrings are rounded at the tops of the teeth. If yours look pointy, it's time for a replacement.

Age and miles ridden are poor predictors for either.
__________________
My greatest fear is all of my kids standing around my coffin and talking about "how sensible" dad was.
Retro Grouch is offline  
Old 03-08-20, 08:56 AM
  #13  
Miele Man
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Location: Ontario, Canada
Posts: 3,800

Bikes: Miele Beta, Miele Latina, Miele Suprema, Miele Uno LS, Miele MTB, Bianchi Model Unknown, Fiori Venezia, VeloSport Adamas AX

Mentioned: 11 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 992 Post(s)
Liked 554 Times in 380 Posts
If a rear rim splits you might be lucky and be able to ride it for a bit maybe enough to get home. I had that happen to me 15 miles from home but was able to ride the bike home SLOWLY as the wheel felt way out of true. On a front wheel? I think a failed rim could well be catastrophic.

Cheers
Miele Man is offline  
Old 03-08-20, 09:11 AM
  #14  
daoswald
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Salt Lake City, UT (Formerly Los Angeles, CA)
Posts: 1,129

Bikes: 2008 Cannondale Synapse -- 2014 Cannondale Quick CX

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 207 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 70 Times in 44 Posts
I don't think I would want to ride a rim that has been subjected to caliper brakes for 18,000 to 22,500 miles. He's not wrong. Both wheels are probably due for replacement. Great time to upgrade.

Unless you are trying to restore a bike to original, there's no reason to stick with the same brand and model of tires that came stock with the bike. If you are riding 2000 to 2500 miles a year, you deserve some nice tires instead of the tires that the manufacturer had a good deal on.

For me, chains start getting old in the 1000 to 1500 mile range. Cassettes in the 4000-5000 mile range. And I've never changed chainrings, though I'd love to get a higher-end chainset on both of my bikes, and probably ought to use mileage as a motivation to do so.
daoswald is offline  
Old 03-08-20, 09:28 AM
  #15  
dedhed
SE Wis
 
dedhed's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Milwaukee, WI
Posts: 6,344

Bikes: '68 Raleigh Sprite, '02 Raleigh C500, '84 Raleigh Gran Prix, '91 Trek 400

Mentioned: 22 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1147 Post(s)
Liked 552 Times in 375 Posts
Originally Posted by essiemyra View Post
information about rim wear. I was thinking that it was a true thing but when I mentioned it to my mechanic brother he thought that it was not an issue I would have to worry about. I can now show him this thread and he can see for himself it is a very real concern. And not one I should take lightly.
Ask him if he ever replaced a brake rotor on a vehicle. Same thing, the rim is basically a brake rotor.

Rim wear is not a thing you can base on miles/years, much more about conditions ridden in and maintenance performed.
People urban riding in wet weather and gritty roads (think PNW) will wear through rims on a regular basis, while others in dry conditions and little reason to brake will outlive a rim. Keeping rims and pads clean, especially after riding in rain, will add to rim longevity. I've never replaced a rim due to wear, but I don't normally ride in conditions that accelerate wear and regularly clean them, nor do I live in a location that has those conditions.

Chain rings are similar to rims in that they normally have a long life given some routine maintenance of the overall drivetrain. Smaller rings will wear faster than bigger rings due to the load being spread over a shorter distance on the ring.
dedhed is offline  
Old 03-08-20, 01:02 PM
  #16  
alcjphil
Senior Member
 
alcjphil's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Montreal, Quebec
Posts: 3,700
Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 885 Post(s)
Liked 251 Times in 161 Posts
The question I have is whether the rear rim has ever been replaced. Generally speaking, rear rims wear many time quicker than fronts. Most people use their rear brake more often than the front, and the rear wheel is subject to road dirt and grit thrown up by the front tire towards the bottom bracket and rear wheel. I have worn out several rear rims riding in wet and dirty road conditions during the 25 years that I was a 8,000 km per year bike commuter. I once wore out a front hub, but the rim was still in pretty good condition
alcjphil is offline  
Likes For alcjphil:
Old 03-09-20, 04:28 AM
  #17  
essiemyra
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Merrimac , MA
Posts: 1,042
Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 51 Post(s)
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Originally Posted by alcjphil View Post
The question I have is whether the rear rim has ever been replaced. Generally speaking, rear rims wear many time quicker than fronts. Most people use their rear brake more often than the front, and the rear wheel is subject to road dirt and grit thrown up by the front tire towards the bottom bracket and rear wheel. I have worn out several rear rims riding in wet and dirty road conditions during the 25 years that I was a 8,000 km per year bike commuter. I once wore out a front hub, but the rim was still in pretty good condition
the rear wheel was replaced a few years ago. I do not remember why it was done but it was replaced.

Last edited by essiemyra; 03-09-20 at 04:32 AM. Reason: incorrect word choice
essiemyra is offline  
Old 03-09-20, 04:31 AM
  #18  
essiemyra
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Merrimac , MA
Posts: 1,042
Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 51 Post(s)
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Originally Posted by dedhed View Post
Ask him if he ever replaced a brake rotor on a vehicle. Same thing, the rim is basically a brake rotor.
I know he has replaced brake rotors as I have watched him do them on my vehicles in the past.

I purchased a new wheel and it was put on the bike Sunday afternoon. I was not riding on that wheel after what I read on this thread.
essiemyra is offline  
Old 03-09-20, 04:39 AM
  #19  
essiemyra
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Merrimac , MA
Posts: 1,042
Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 51 Post(s)
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Originally Posted by daoswald View Post
I don't think I would want to ride a rim that has been subjected to caliper brakes for 18,000 to 22,500 miles. He's not wrong. Both wheels are probably due for replacement. Great time to upgrade.

Unless you are trying to restore a bike to original, there's no reason to stick with the same brand and model of tires that came stock with the bike. If you are riding 2000 to 2500 miles a year, you deserve some nice tires instead of the tires that the manufacturer had a good deal on.

For me, chains start getting old in the 1000 to 1500 mile range. Cassettes in the 4000-5000 mile range. And I've never changed chainrings, though I'd love to get a higher-end chainset on both of my bikes, and probably ought to use mileage as a motivation to do so.
I am not trying to restore the bike to original. I have upgraded the tires to a brand and model that was recommended to me by the lbs and I love them.
I have also changed the chain and cassette at least twice over the last 9 years. I try and do the maintainence to keep the bike running nice.
essiemyra is offline  
Old 03-09-20, 08:07 AM
  #20  
subgrade
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2018
Location: Rīga, Latvia
Posts: 652

Bikes: Focus Crater Lake

Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 282 Post(s)
Liked 209 Times in 125 Posts
It's impossible to tell for sure without seeing it, but after 20K miles it is very likely that at least one of the chainrings need replacement (if it's not the riveted type - then replacement of the whole crankset would be in order). Even if it's not as badly worn as to cause chain skip, it might cause chain suck (chainlinks not properly disengaging from chainring teeth thus the chain wraps back up the chainring) which in turn can cause serious damage to rear derailleur.

Regarding the tire situation, I don't think the mechanic was trying to rip you off, since he suggested a cheaper tire, not a more expensive one.
subgrade is offline  
Old 03-09-20, 11:36 AM
  #21  
cpach
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Mt Shasta, CA, USA
Posts: 1,572

Bikes: Too many. Cannondale SuperSix, Trek Remedy 8, Trek Crossrip+ get the most ride time.

Mentioned: 18 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 338 Post(s)
Liked 109 Times in 88 Posts
Nothing about the shop's actions or recommendations seems suspect to me.

Chains need replacing the most often, cassettes less so, and cranksets much less so. Maybe 4 chains for every 2 cassettes and 1 set of chainrings, likely less chainring changes than that. This is assuming you're replacing the chain often and early when worn--you can blow through all three pretty easily if you just ride it into the ground. That said, with the mileage and time you've had the bike chainring replacements may likely be required and will almost certainly shift better. Given the relatively entry level nature of your bike, new chainrings (or often a new crankset--it's sometimes cheaper than new rings weirdly enough) of similar quality would be a pretty reasonable investment given the admirable amount of riding you do.

Your mechanic is likely recommending a sane course of action that DEFINITELY will work well. If you'd like, you can ask them to install a new chain and cassette and see if the chain skips on any of the old chainrings or shifts poorly, but given the mileage you have all new would be totally sensible without any testing.

Failing to find a tire isn't really a sign of trustworthiness or mechanical competence, it's really easy to miss things like that.

My viewpoint is informed but really biased as a professional mechanic. I have nearly never seen mechanics recommend needless service or try to rip customers off. A sign of a trustworthy mechanic is often that they will outline indicated maintenance and be clear at describing what will improve if service is completed, and what the consequences will be if its not and will outline a best-better-good lineup of options, wherein best is pretty much all recommendable maintenance, better is a good balance given the value and use of the bike, and good restores the bike to safe and rideable condition and/or avoids very expensive costs with inexpensive repairs.
cpach is offline  
Old 03-09-20, 12:44 PM
  #22  
pdlamb
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: northern Deep South
Posts: 5,851

Bikes: Fuji Touring, Novara Randonee

Mentioned: 29 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1171 Post(s)
Liked 239 Times in 172 Posts
Nine years won't wear out a rim. That raised my BS flag. Rim wear, sure, but age is just a number. I'd check with another shop, mechanic, or a rider whom you trust before I swapped the rim.

Did he show you how the chainring was worn? If you've changed the chains before they get too worn, you may have replaced a cassette or two, and one or more chainring(s) might be worn. If it ain't worn, you don't need to change anything. With the (new/not-stretched) chain on the small or middle ring, try to pull the chain forward and off the ring. If you can see daylight between the chain and the ring, the ring will need to be replaced. If the chain slips on the ring when you put a new chain on, the ring needs to be replaced. Those are the only two diagnostics I know of -- although someone may pipe in with another. If neither of those says "new ring," well, you probably don't need a new ring.
pdlamb is offline  
Old 03-09-20, 01:22 PM
  #23  
Wilfred Laurier
Señor Member
 
Wilfred Laurier's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Posts: 5,031
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 627 Post(s)
Liked 258 Times in 190 Posts
An indicator that the mechanic was not trying to rip you off was that he was suggesting a cheaper tire than the exact replacement. This tells me that he did not know the more expensive ones were in stock, as there are often a pile of tires in the shop that go on repair bikes, and another pile that is kept where customers can see and touch them. There is nothing suspicious about a particular make and model of tire in one of these places and not in the other.
Wilfred Laurier is offline  
Old 03-09-20, 01:55 PM
  #24  
rydabent
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Lincoln Ne
Posts: 7,914

Bikes: RANS Stratus TerraTrike Tour II

Mentioned: 24 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1594 Post(s)
Liked 190 Times in 118 Posts
Unless the bike was ridden on wet sandy roads I doubt the rims need to be replaced. Just because you see fine wear marks, they occur shortly after you get the bike.

As an aside the pictures of the worn out rims that have broken go against what riders that dont like disc brakes say.

Last edited by rydabent; 03-09-20 at 02:00 PM.
rydabent is offline  
Old 03-10-20, 06:04 AM
  #25  
Phil_gretz
Journeyman Bike Commuter
 
Phil_gretz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Alexandria, VA
Posts: 5,739

Bikes: '71 Jeunet 640, '74 Fuji Special Road Racer, '79 Peugeot PXN10LE, '88 Fuji Saratoga, '13 Motobecane Fantom29 HT, '16 Motobecane Turino Pro Disc, '16 Motobecane Gran Premio Elite, '18 Velobuild VB-R-022

Mentioned: 16 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 910 Post(s)
Liked 513 Times in 292 Posts
Originally Posted by dedhed View Post
Ask him if he ever replaced a brake rotor on a vehicle. Same thing, the rim is basically a brake rotor.
^my thought. Ask OP's brother what he would do with an aluminum brake rotor...
Phil_gretz is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information

Copyright © 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.