Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Commuting
Reload this Page >

Commitment to commuter cycling

Notices
Commuting Bicycle commuting is easier than you think, before you know it, you'll be hooked. Learn the tips, hints, equipment, safety requirements for safely riding your bike to work.

Commitment to commuter cycling

Old 01-23-20, 08:17 PM
  #1  
Steve06119
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Steve06119's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2019
Location: Hartford, CT
Posts: 18

Bikes: Cannondale Quick + Trek 720

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 13 Post(s)
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Commitment to commuter cycling

A 2018 study found on average "one-way household trips show that the majority (59.4%) of vehicle trips were less than six miles."

Has anyone thought about getting rid of their vehicle and becoming cycle dependent? I know weather based on where you live is a factor, but as an avid cyclist once said (para), "It's not whether it's too cold to cycle, but rather are you properly suited up."

Be good to get your thoughts and dialog going. Thanks - Steve


My 2010 Cannondale Quick

Last edited by Steve06119; 01-23-20 at 08:31 PM.
Steve06119 is offline  
Likes For Steve06119:
Old 01-23-20, 09:10 PM
  #2  
katsup
Senior Member
 
katsup's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2016
Location: Southern California
Posts: 1,209

Bikes: Soma Fog Cutter & Vintage Mountain Bikes

Mentioned: 15 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 409 Post(s)
Liked 210 Times in 125 Posts
There is a "Living Car Free" subforum on here that you should visit.
katsup is offline  
Likes For katsup:
Old 01-23-20, 09:16 PM
  #3  
Steve06119
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Steve06119's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2019
Location: Hartford, CT
Posts: 18

Bikes: Cannondale Quick + Trek 720

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 13 Post(s)
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Originally Posted by katsup View Post
There is a "Living Car Free" subforum on here that you should visit.
Thank you so much about the “Living Car Free” Forum.

I’m a new member to the “BikeForum” community and still learning how to navigate around.

Thanks Again - Steve
Steve06119 is offline  
Old 01-24-20, 08:44 AM
  #4  
BobbyG
Senior Member
 
BobbyG's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Colorado Springs, CO
Posts: 4,872

Bikes: 2015 Charge Plug, 1997 Nishiki Blazer, 1984 Nishiki International

Mentioned: 50 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1035 Post(s)
Liked 541 Times in 281 Posts
Originally Posted by Steve06119 View Post
Has anyone thought about getting rid of their vehicle and becoming cycle dependent?...Be good to get your thoughts...
I think it's a valid question to ask in the Commuting Forum. Obviously the goal of folks in the Car Free forum is to become (or stay) car free. But what about bike commuters?

The title of this post is "Commitment to Commuter Cycling" and the question is about "becoming cycle dependent".

It may seem like a logical progression from bike commuting to a car-free existence. After all, bike commuters are car-free commuters, which usually means commuting to work, or a regularly visited location; but the term "commuting" is vague or broad enough to encompass driving or travel in general. But I don't think one follows the other.

For me, and I assume many others, biking to work is how I fit fitness into my daily schedule. My drive to and from work takes about 50 minutes out of my day. My bike ride to and from work takes about an hour and a half of riding (plus another 30 min for changing, etc.). Thats 90 minutes of exercise for only 40 extra minutes traveling. Plus unlike a stationary bike or treadmill, once I get going I can't stop halfway if I'm not feeling it.

And since some semblance of fitness is my goal and I live in a walkable neighborhood I will also walk or bike to the grocery store when buying few enough items to carry home on foot or in my bike baskets. I will also walk to lunch on workdays, which means 15-20 minutes each way depending on where I'm going, and sometimes biking further. On paydays I will bike three miles at lunch to hit two banks and lunch. But again, my goal is staying fit-ish. And that is why I also take in a weekend ride or two, just for the sheer joy of it also.

I know there are some who bike to reduce their impact on the environment, or to keep from enriching certain industries or countries, but those are not my prime motivators.

But I do drive...and I see no practical alternative to most of it.

While I do bike in snow , ice and rain year-round I do have limits: 5F and 3-inches of snow. Below 5F it is too dangerous if I have to stop due to mechanical or physical issues, and above 3-inches my speed drops to walking speed. If it's too icy to drive and too cold to bike, I will take the bus, but that takes up to 90 minutes each way!

And then there is the issue of family commitments. When I was young and single I could have probably been car free. But my wife dosen't bike and a tandem would only lead to divorce, so that makes biking out for dinner or entertainment with her impossible. If one has young children they need to ferry around, a cargo bike or a bike with a trailer may work in some situations, but not mine. We have had ongoing medical conditions in the family that require getting across town or state quickly. For the last couple of years we have been taking care of my 90-year old mother-in-law who no longer drives and can barely walk. And, heck, I'm almost 60, and am keenly aware of wear and tear on my body, and a diminishing of achievable physical limits.

Family-sized grocery runs and other shopping, after-school sports and activities, socializing, get-togethers and entertainment are all possible without a car, but they require an enourmous time commitment or reliance on public transportation or cabs, ride shares, etc, which in themselves require time and monetary commitments.

And then there's the funk and mess of days filled with cycling.

I realize that some people are in situations that precludes car ownership, and I sympathize with them. Others have made a decision to live car-free and I admire that kind of commitment if it doesn't negatively impact their families.

Time, weather, distance local topography and cargo and passenger-carrying ability, funk and mess...for a truly car-free life these require the kind of committment I am not willing to make, and fortunately, I don't have to.

But I am willing, able and eager to bike to work and back. It is a great joy, and yields the level of fitness I desire to enjoy life and be healthy enough to be there for my family.
BobbyG is offline  
Likes For BobbyG:
Old 01-24-20, 08:52 AM
  #5  
wipekitty
vespertine member
 
wipekitty's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: from sea to shining sea!
Posts: 2,414

Bikes: Yes

Mentioned: 22 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 666 Post(s)
Liked 188 Times in 141 Posts
Yes - check out "Living Car Free". But, be aware that it can get a bit interesting in there at times!

To answer your question: I was bike-dependent for 5 1/2 years in a small town in the Upper Midwest. Other household members opted for transit (which was poor) or walking. Sidewalks (for walking) and wide traffic lanes (for cycling) made it easy to get around, haul a trailer, and so on. The biggest issue was ice; we had to use cleated shoes and spiked tires in the winter.

My current location is a bit different. Roads are very narrow, there is little cycling infrastructure, things are more spread out, and my 9 mile one-way commute to work is not served by transit. Bike dependence would be more difficult (but not impossible) for an adult with grocery collection duties and a full-time job.
wipekitty is offline  
Old 01-24-20, 11:43 AM
  #6  
Notso_fastLane
Senior Member
 
Notso_fastLane's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Layton, UT
Posts: 1,309

Bikes: 2011 Bent TW Elegance 2014 Carbon Strada Velomobile

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 360 Post(s)
Liked 339 Times in 206 Posts
When I lived in AZ (I know, what's winter?) I got around with nothing but a bicycle (didn't even own a car or motorcycle) for nearly 10 years, averaging right around 1000 miles/month.

Now, I commute, and will stop on the way home for groceries if they're reasonably small (less than 4-5 plastic bags worth). I am looking into getting a trailer for the bulkier stuff (my wife drinks diet soda), but usually I just drive for that. I commute probably 9 days out of 10 on average, and still go on weekend rides.
Notso_fastLane is offline  
Old 01-24-20, 04:02 PM
  #7  
Amt0571
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Location: Catalonia
Posts: 436

Bikes: Canyon Grand Canyon AL SL 8.0, Btwin Ultra 520 AF GF, Dahon Mu P27, Triban Road 7

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 163 Post(s)
Liked 65 Times in 44 Posts
I live in a hilly area. I always use the bike if possible. Lots of times however I need to arrive with a decent appearance and don't have showers available at destination. Others I have too much distance and little time to cover it... I do what I can, but in no way it approximates a car free life, unfortunately.

Having a 3y/o at home makes riding difficult too...
Amt0571 is online now  
Old 01-24-20, 04:12 PM
  #8  
LorenMiranda
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
Location: Spokane Valley Washington
Posts: 130

Bikes: 1995 Schwinn ClearCreek

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 25 Post(s)
Liked 16 Times in 14 Posts
I can dig this thread... I ride 365 in Spokane valley Washington. I am car free but mostly use my conveyance for work commute. Grocery getter stuff. I don't like the car light-car free who gives a car &$#@ stuff in the other category too much. But I ride... 365. Commuting amongst my community. Ok
LorenMiranda is offline  
Old 01-24-20, 04:29 PM
  #9  
Darth Lefty 
Disco Infiltrator
 
Darth Lefty's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Folsom CA
Posts: 10,751

Bikes: Schwinn Paramount, Salsa Timberjack, Diamondback Expert TG, Burley Samba

Mentioned: 63 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1908 Post(s)
Liked 479 Times in 331 Posts
I live 3.5 miles from work, in a town that's one of the most bike-friendly in the nation, situated in a great climate, and I don't have any other time in my day for going to a gym. It really is a no-brainer. I used to live further (5.5 miles) and the difference in the ride time, tiredness and home time with the kids was noticeable. If I lived twelve miles from work I'd do something else. Some of the guys on this forum doing 40 miles RT, 200 days a year, I can't imagine.

FWIW, I live in the neighborhood nearest east of my job. There are closer apartments, but 3-3.5 miles is about the distance for houses. There other neighborhoods similar distance west and north. But that wasn't why we chose this house. We moved because we wanted to change school districts, and the former house was in a suburb that's going to the dogs. If I had wound up with a 12 mile haul, I'd have accepted it... and done something other than bike commuting.
__________________
Genesis 49:16-17
Darth Lefty is offline  
Old 01-24-20, 04:53 PM
  #10  
wolfchild
Senior Member
 
wolfchild's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Mississauga/Toronto, Ontario canada
Posts: 6,106

Bikes: I have 3 singlespeed/fixed gear bikes

Mentioned: 21 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1747 Post(s)
Liked 389 Times in 217 Posts
Originally Posted by Steve06119 View Post

Has anyone thought about getting rid of their vehicle and becoming cycle dependent?
I did an experiment a couple of years ago, got rid of my vehicle and lived car-free for over 3 years and it became a hassle filled with inconvenience... I prefer to have a vehicle and live car-light. The weather has nothing to do with it as I've been an all year round commuter for the past 13 years. The problem with living without a car is that it puts serious limitations on your ability to go visit places, it can also limits your opportunities for employment. I am also a recreational ride who likes to go mountain biking and riding gravel on the weekends and I need a vehicle so I can get to those places which I enjoy riding.... There are also days when I come home from long hard day of work and I just don't feel like getting back on my bicycle ( after I just finished my bike commute from work), just to go to a store to get something.
wolfchild is offline  
Likes For wolfchild:
Old 01-24-20, 05:08 PM
  #11  
Piperflyer
Senior Member
 
Piperflyer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2018
Posts: 63
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 17 Post(s)
Liked 4 Times in 4 Posts
I commute daily, if its bad weather 20F or real rainy i go 6 miles. Otherwise i go 24 mile route 4x a week. If i go anywhere with in 20 miles one way, its an automatic bike ride. My 6 year old can ride up to 20 miles right now but it takes awhile avg around 10mph. So if time is strained then i take the car. With that said, i just put gas in my car this past Friday, the last time i put gas in it? September 4th 2019. I have to keep a trickle charge on my car.

I keep the car around because well i have kids, and they are 6, and 7. But only use it when i have to or the need warrants it. (Wife had to go to ER once for serious asthma attack). The car does come handy. But going to dinner with in 8 miles ? Heck whole family saddles up and rides to dinner. If I’m paying, they have to work for it if they want the treat of eating out
Piperflyer is offline  
Old 01-24-20, 07:55 PM
  #12  
Steve06119
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Steve06119's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2019
Location: Hartford, CT
Posts: 18

Bikes: Cannondale Quick + Trek 720

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 13 Post(s)
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Originally Posted by Piperflyer View Post
I commute daily, if its bad weather 20F or real rainy i go 6 miles. Otherwise i go 24 mile route 4x a week. If i go anywhere with in 20 miles one way, its an automatic bike ride. My 6 year old can ride up to 20 miles right now but it takes awhile avg around 10mph. So if time is strained then i take the car. With that said, i just put gas in my car this past Friday, the last time i put gas in it? September 4th 2019. I have to keep a trickle charge on my car.

I keep the car around because well i have kids, and they are 6, and 7. But only use it when i have to or the need warrants it. (Wife had to go to ER once for serious asthma attack). The car does come handy. But going to dinner with in 8 miles ? Heck whole family saddles up and rides to dinner. If I’m paying, they have to work for it if they want the treat of eating out
24 miles 4x/week! WOW! Great job!
Steve06119 is offline  
Old 01-24-20, 08:10 PM
  #13  
PaulH
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: Washington, DC
Posts: 3,592
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 78 Post(s)
Liked 29 Times in 21 Posts
I'm basically bike dependant. Every other way to get to work is slower and less convenient. My bike is a practical tool for slogging to work under all conditions, but my car is for fun and recreation. If the roads are salted, I never drive.
PaulH is offline  
Likes For PaulH:
Old 01-24-20, 09:39 PM
  #14  
Jim from Boston
Senior Member
 
Jim from Boston's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 7,357
Mentioned: 47 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 792 Post(s)
Liked 193 Times in 156 Posts
Commitment to commuter cycling
Originally Posted by BobbyG View Post
I think it's a valid question to ask in the Commuting Forum. Obviously the goal of folks in the Car Free forum is to become (or stay) car free. But what about bike commuters?...

I realize that some people are in situations that precludes car ownership, and I sympathize with them. Others have made a decision to live car-free and I admire that kind of commitment if it doesn't negatively impact their families.

Time, weather, distance local topography and cargo and passenger-carrying ability, funk and mess..for a truly car-free life these require the kind of committment I am not willing to make, and fortunately, I don't have to.

But I am willing, able and eager to bike to work and back. It is a great joy, and yields the level of fitness I desire to enjoy life and be healthy enough to be there for my family.
Nice summary @BobbyG, and very similar to my preferences and situation.


However, Boston City Proper is quite amenable to a car-free, and detrimental to a car-intense lifestyle. Though I have a 14 mile one-way pleasant commute to the suburbs, I also have very convenient Commuter Rail at the start and finish ends, and can even take my bike on board, as a reverse commuter.

A final quirk that allows me to be car free, but paradoxically inhibits my cycle commuting:
Originally Posted by Jim from Boston View Post
…I have previously posted to this thread, Why didn’t I ride
Originally Posted by Jim from Boston View Post
My job; either too much to do, so i stay (comfortably) overnight and resume very early in the a.m., missing my commute; or have to travel afar for a meeting...and to a lesser extent, family activities.
Originally Posted by Jim from Boston View Post
My cycling lifestyle is important to me and retirement vis-à-vis cycling poses a dilemma.

i previously replied to this thread on the commuting forum, "How to motivate myself to ride when I'll no longer be commuting to work?"...

Just yesterday a colleague asked me when I was going to retire. I suggested a number of years, adding, "I like my job, and it’s a convenient place (and distance) to bike to."

Last edited by Jim from Boston; 01-25-20 at 06:40 AM.
Jim from Boston is offline  
Likes For Jim from Boston:
Old 01-25-20, 07:38 AM
  #15  
locolobo13 
Senior Member
 
locolobo13's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Phx, AZ
Posts: 1,750

Bikes: Trek Mtn Bike

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 156 Post(s)
Liked 446 Times in 146 Posts
Last year my job moved. Previously I lived <5 mi from work. Rode to work almost every day. Car free? No. Just enjoy riding. But it did keep my car mileage down.

Now I live ~25 mi from work. Tried combining the light rail with riding. The light rail takes more than an hour to get to the ride part. Then I had a 45-60 min ride to work. Reverse at the end of the day. Driving to a park and ride takes less than 30 min. Costs more but that extra hour a day is worth it to me.

Currently I drive ~20 mi, ride ~7 mi each way. 14-15 mi/day is about right for me. About ~75 min each way. Not even considering getting rid of the car.
locolobo13 is offline  
Likes For locolobo13:
Old 01-25-20, 09:51 AM
  #16  
noglider 
aka Tom Reingold
 
noglider's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: High Falls, NY, USA
Posts: 38,851

Bikes: 1962 Rudge Sports, 1971 Raleigh Super Course, 1971 Raleigh Pro Track, 1974 Raleigh International, 1975 Viscount Fixie, 1982 McLean, 1996 Lemond (Ti), 2002 Burley Zydeco tandem

Mentioned: 467 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6345 Post(s)
Liked 899 Times in 587 Posts
Don't check out Living Car Free. It is acrimonious. The folks here are nicer.
__________________
Tom Reingold, tom@noglider.com
New York City and High Falls, NY
Blogs: The Experienced Cyclist; noglider's ride blog

“When man invented the bicycle he reached the peak of his attainments.” — Elizabeth West, US author

Please email me rather than PM'ing me. Thanks.
noglider is offline  
Likes For noglider:
Old 01-25-20, 05:12 PM
  #17  
Amt0571
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Location: Catalonia
Posts: 436

Bikes: Canyon Grand Canyon AL SL 8.0, Btwin Ultra 520 AF GF, Dahon Mu P27, Triban Road 7

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 163 Post(s)
Liked 65 Times in 44 Posts
Originally Posted by locolobo13 View Post
Last year my job moved. Previously I lived <5 mi from work. Rode to work almost every day. Car free? No. Just enjoy riding. But it did keep my car mileage down.

Now I live ~25 mi from work. Tried combining the light rail with riding. The light rail takes more than an hour to get to the ride part. Then I had a 45-60 min ride to work. Reverse at the end of the day. Driving to a park and ride takes less than 30 min. Costs more but that extra hour a day is worth it to me.

Currently I drive ~20 mi, ride ~7 mi each way. 14-15 mi/day is about right for me. About ~75 min each way. Not even considering getting rid of the car.
I live 30km from work and what I'm doing is that I commute by bike twice a week. Would do it every day if I could, but it's not possible and also introduces a bit of a lost time chainging and showering...
Amt0571 is online now  
Old 01-25-20, 06:15 PM
  #18  
Miele Man
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Location: Ontario, Canada
Posts: 3,800

Bikes: Miele Beta, Miele Latina, Miele Suprema, Miele Uno LS, Miele MTB, Bianchi Model Unknown, Fiori Venezia, VeloSport Adamas AX

Mentioned: 11 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 992 Post(s)
Liked 554 Times in 380 Posts
I use my bicycle for commuting as well as exploring towns and cities near me. I've also used my bicycle to bring home large objects such as a Dehumidifier, a recliner/rocker chair, a couple of bar chairs and I used a Dahon trailer to move from my apartment years ago and put a bar-refrigerator on the top of that trailer.

I found that bicycle commuting in Toronto Canada was faster than public transit over distances of 15 miles and more. Plus, with the bicycle I could avoid any traffic jams due to accidents or take an alternative rout for more exercise.

Cheers
Miele Man is offline  
Likes For Miele Man:
Old 01-25-20, 07:41 PM
  #19  
Steely Dan
born again cyclist
 
Steely Dan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Chicago
Posts: 2,398

Bikes: I have five of brikes

Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 200 Post(s)
Liked 60 Times in 25 Posts
I was a city-living car-free bachelor for most of my 20s and early 30s.

Then I met the woman of my dreams, and she came bundled with a car.

Now we have two young children, and our car is ABSOLUTELY very useful at times, especially for frequent family trips up to Milwaukee to visit my wife's parents and sisters.

But my bike commuting, along with living in a walkable city neighborhood very close to multiple bus and train transit lines, helps keep us a one-car family.

I don't see us getting rid of our car, especially because our 3-flat unit came with a deeded off-street parking space, thus removing one of the biggest annoyances of owning a car in the city: where to park the damn thing. But it is my hope to continue the one-car family thing for as long as possible (ideally forever).

Last edited by Steely Dan; 01-25-20 at 07:56 PM.
Steely Dan is offline  
Old 01-26-20, 01:45 AM
  #20  
sean.hwy
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2020
Location: San Jose
Posts: 197

Bikes: Topstone AL 105 / SystemSix Carbon Ultegra

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 78 Post(s)
Liked 42 Times in 30 Posts
Seems like the only people that can live car free or hot young ladies. I belong to a lot of hiking/fitness groups. Every hike/event there was a lady asking for a car pool.

I was using a motorcycle for four years as my only transportation. I don't miss the hassele. Nice to have a car I can just pop in without putting all my motorcycle gear on to get groceries. Nice to have a car to go hiking and leave my house at 5/6am on sat without all my gear that I have not place to put it when I get to the trail. If living with just motorcycle is a PITA living with just bike would be 100x worse.
sean.hwy is offline  
Old 01-26-20, 06:01 AM
  #21  
Jim from Boston
Senior Member
 
Jim from Boston's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 7,357
Mentioned: 47 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 792 Post(s)
Liked 193 Times in 156 Posts
I recently posted to this thread,
Originally Posted by BobbyG View Post
I realize that some people are in situations that precludes car ownership, and I sympathize with them. Others have made a decision to live car-free and I admire that kind of commitment if it doesn't negatively impact their families.

Time, weather, distance local topography and cargo and passenger-carrying ability, funk and mess..for a truly car-free life these require the kind of committment I am not willing to make, and fortunately, I don't have to.

But I am willing, able and eager to bike to work and back. It is a great joy, and yields the level of fitness I desire to enjoy life and be healthy enough to be there for my family.
Originally Posted by Jim from Boston View Post
Nice summary @BobbyG, and very similar to my preferences and situation.
Similarly as I replied to @BobbyG, I see similarities with my situation and @Steely Dan
Originally Posted by Steely Dan View Post
I was a city-living car-free bachelor for most of my 20s and early 30s.

Then I met the woman of my dreams, and she came bundled with a car.

Now we have two young children, and our car is ABSOLUTELY very useful at times, especially for frequent family trips up to Milwaukee to visit my wife's parents and sisters.

But my bike commuting, along with living in a walkable city neighborhood very close to multiple bus and train transit lines, helps keep us a one-car family.

I don't see us getting rid of our car, especially because our 3-flat unit came with a deeded off-street parking space, thus removing one of the biggest annoyances of owning a car in the city: where to park the damn thing. But it is my hope to continue the one-car family thing for as long as possible (ideally forever).
Originally Posted by Jim from Boston View Post
However, Boston City Proper is quite amenable to a car-free, and detrimental to a car-intense lifestyle.

Though I have a 14 mile one-way pleasant commute to the suburbs, I also have very convenient Commuter Rail at the start and finish ends, and can even take my bike on board, as a reverse commuter.
Originally Posted by Jim from Boston View Post
I have posted that I consider myself (seriously) Car-Lite…It’s my wife’s car and I use it sparingly at her convenience, though I’m the major breadwinner.

A new twist is that our adult son who lives in our building recently bought a car, mainly for his weekday job, So now with three drivers (not including the daughter) we share two cars, me the lowest priority since I don’t have one.

I mostly commute by bike (14 miles) and convenient commuter rail, and nearly always use the car only on weekends when the Commuter Rail schedule is reduced and family activities frequent.

We live in an area with tight parking restrictions. nearly entirely two-hour metered parking, except on Sundays and Holidays, from 8 AM to 6 PM; many residential-only spots with vigorous enforcement; and only one block in this high-density residental and commercial neighborhood with time-unlimited parking with a residential sticker.

We do own one deeded full-time unlimited parking space, that our son sometime uses. Our car is an SUV and more utilitarian than his sedan so we also share according to the purpose of the trip.

Last edited by Jim from Boston; 01-26-20 at 04:22 PM.
Jim from Boston is offline  
Old 01-26-20, 10:03 AM
  #22  
noglider 
aka Tom Reingold
 
noglider's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: High Falls, NY, USA
Posts: 38,851

Bikes: 1962 Rudge Sports, 1971 Raleigh Super Course, 1971 Raleigh Pro Track, 1974 Raleigh International, 1975 Viscount Fixie, 1982 McLean, 1996 Lemond (Ti), 2002 Burley Zydeco tandem

Mentioned: 467 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6345 Post(s)
Liked 899 Times in 587 Posts
Living Car Free is difficult or ill-advised for many. But using your car less is an excellent thing. You can use it less than you think. And you should. There's too much driving going on.
__________________
Tom Reingold, tom@noglider.com
New York City and High Falls, NY
Blogs: The Experienced Cyclist; noglider's ride blog

“When man invented the bicycle he reached the peak of his attainments.” — Elizabeth West, US author

Please email me rather than PM'ing me. Thanks.
noglider is offline  
Likes For noglider:
Old 01-27-20, 11:22 AM
  #23  
gracehowler
Rod & Judy
 
gracehowler's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Montrose, CO
Posts: 562

Bikes: Specialized S-works E-5, Davinci joint venture, Specialized Vienna Commuter

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 20 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 4 Times in 4 Posts
In some places, "car free" is easy, in others, weather, traffic, time, take their toll on riding. I believe walking or riding requires a "gut level" commitment, I find it easy to hop in the car for errands, work etc, but I decided 50 years ago that I could easily "schedule" commuting into my work time.
I have been fortunate to wear a uniform all of my work life, so the inclement weather, dust, sweat has not been a factor unlike those who lives are in an office. I used my own mantra, " just do it", and knew when to leave to arrive timely and stuck to it. I am now reaping the $$ and the health benefits of a commuting life style. I have to agree with Tom, "difficult or ill-advised" is real, we just have to focus and ride when we can,
Rod
gracehowler is offline  
Likes For gracehowler:
Old 01-27-20, 04:32 PM
  #24  
Notso_fastLane
Senior Member
 
Notso_fastLane's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Layton, UT
Posts: 1,309

Bikes: 2011 Bent TW Elegance 2014 Carbon Strada Velomobile

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 360 Post(s)
Liked 339 Times in 206 Posts
I'm looking into getting a small trailer to reduce my car use even further and use the bike and velo more for grocery shopping.

I can fit a 2 x 20 lb bags of cat food in the velo, but I need to put extra air in the rear shock before I do.
Notso_fastLane is offline  
Old 01-27-20, 07:39 PM
  #25  
alloo
Senior Member
 
alloo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2019
Location: Denver, CO
Posts: 310

Bikes: Electra Townie 21d, 2020 Blix Aveny

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 116 Post(s)
Liked 77 Times in 58 Posts
Originally Posted by Notso_fastLane View Post
When I lived in AZ (I know, what's winter?) I got around with nothing but a bicycle (didn't even own a car or motorcycle) for nearly 10 years, averaging right around 1000 miles/month.

Now, I commute, and will stop on the way home for groceries if they're reasonably small (less than 4-5 plastic bags worth). I am looking into getting a trailer for the bulkier stuff (my wife drinks diet soda), but usually I just drive for that. I commute probably 9 days out of 10 on average, and still go on weekend rides.
Why not get your groceries delivered? Most Markets have delivery service now a days.
alloo is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information

Copyright © 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.