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Multi climate tours - logistics

Old 09-04-19, 12:46 PM
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Multi climate tours - logistics

Next year we are planning on a 3-4 month tour that will transition from very hot weather to coolish/cold weather. We figure the first 3 months or so will be hot to very hot while the last month will be cold. We are not interested in carrying cold weather gear for ~3 months. We are interested in hearing how others have handled similar situations. The tour will be through central Asia with extremely flexible timings.
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Old 09-04-19, 01:48 PM
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Originally Posted by pjsingh View Post
Next year we are planning on a 3-4 month tour that will transition from very hot weather to coolish/cold weather. We figure the first 3 months or so will be hot to very hot while the last month will be cold. We are not interested in carrying cold weather gear for ~3 months. We are interested in hearing how others have handled similar situations. The tour will be through central Asia with extremely flexible timings.
While I have not done that exact thing myself I could see two solutions working well. Either buy the cold weather gear as you need it locally or box it ahead of time and leave it with a trusted friend/family member to mail/fedex when you need it.
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Old 09-04-19, 02:03 PM
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I think this one depends a lot on where you are traveling. For some countries, customs/shipping can either be expensive (e.g. DHL) or navigating the import duties/customs route can be troublesome.

So it depends a bit, but I've used all of the following approaches:
1. I've carried more gear than I needed. For example, I carried a lot of cold weather gear through Central America even though it really wasn't needed.
2. I've essentially used a courier, namely someone who was joining later or for a short duration that brought some key pieces.
3. I've bought a few things along the way. For example, I bought an extra sleeping bag to double up in western China - and also got one from a different traveler before ascending to Bolivia Altiplano. I've also shopped in larger places like Lima but not bought anything.
4. I've investigated shipping services for expats. Decided not to use them in that particular case. Again, the key issue is finding someone knowledgeable of how to get goods into particular countries in a timely and cost-effective way
5. I've broken up my trip with a short trip home to pick up additional gear and then flying back in.

Exactly what works for you will likely be situation dependent and hence in addition to posting to this group, I'd suggest browsing additional travel blogs from cyclists going through those areas - since inevitably, something breaks or needs replacing and then that has to be problem solved...
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Old 09-04-19, 02:15 PM
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Originally Posted by pjsingh View Post
Next year we are planning on a 3-4 month tour that will transition from very hot weather to coolish/cold weather.
Can you put numbers on coolish/cold? You mean -20c daytime or close to freezing at night?
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Old 09-04-19, 02:45 PM
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no personal experience, but I have read of many frustrating customs/border stories by folks trying to get stuff shipped to X country, and it getting held up, lost, stolen, mired in red tape, costing a fortune in fees to get it released etc.....

Over the years of reading trip journals and this coming up a number of times, it would make me very wary of trying to ship stuff--although I guess realistically it depends on the countries, although I suspect all the "stans", ex Soviet countries and whatnot will have the same issues that I have read of predominantly with Latin American countries.
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Old 09-04-19, 05:12 PM
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One additional suggestion. Post a question in Lonely Planet Thorn Tree forums for particular countries of the following format:

(Uzbekistan): Where can I find outdoor stores in Tashkent to buy winter clothes, sleeping bag, ...

While I haven't been there, I've traveled enough to expect Tashkent, Dushanbe, Astana, Kashgar and similar large cities to have certain amounts of camping stores with basics like a warm sleeping bag. Particularly those areas closer to the Himalaya and places tourists might come. This doesn't work if you aren't normal sizes and likely might not be the newest/lightest stuff, but my travels in similar areas suggests it can be found. The trick is how to find this in advance.

Hence, posting to a travel-related forum like Lonely Planet will likely dig up more specific knowledge.

I share djb's concern about using postal services unless you actually have familiarity (or local contact who can navigate the system).
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Old 09-05-19, 12:03 AM
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more detail needed:

define the temperature ranges for hot, very hot, and cool/cold.

where in "central" asia? 'tis a big place, with many local variations in gear availability, customs fees, shipping times, and "tea money" required to expedite things.

what gear do you absolutely require that could not be covered using local clothing and equipment?
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Old 09-05-19, 03:33 AM
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Can you buy clothes etc. when you need them?
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Old 09-05-19, 08:51 AM
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I have no experience with the countries where you are so can't say how mail and shipping is there, but...
I have had good luck with having stuff sent to and from home via mail. General Delivery (Poste restante) has worked well for me and I am told it is available in many countries.

Barring that, buying a few items along the way is usually possible. A warm shirt, hat, socks, or tights bought along the way can make a big difference and can be slept in.

Not sure what temperatures you will be dealing with. I manage to deal with overnight frost (and the occasional 10-20F overnight low) with my summer gear and I pack crazy light. I wear all my clothes or pile them on top of me at night if necessary. I find a really heavy pair of socks to wear when sleeping helps immensely. I managed the US southern tier in winter with 14# of stuff including my summer clothing, and camping and cooking gear with that approach. I had frequent overnight frost, a little snow by the roadside on the passes, and one night that my thermometer read 18F in the morning. I was comfortable enough and don't think I would have been in danger if it had been a little colder.
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Old 09-05-19, 12:55 PM
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Originally Posted by gauvins View Post
Can you put numbers on coolish/cold? You mean -20c daytime or close to freezing at night?
We expect the temperatures to range from 40+C to maybe -10C. Not crazy cold but cold enough to have to think about season specific clothing.
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Old 09-05-19, 12:57 PM
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Originally Posted by mev View Post
One additional suggestion. Post a question in Lonely Planet Thorn Tree forums for particular countries of the following format:

(Uzbekistan): Where can I find outdoor stores in Tashkent to buy winter clothes, sleeping bag, ...

While I haven't been there, I've traveled enough to expect Tashkent, Dushanbe, Astana, Kashgar and similar large cities to have certain amounts of camping stores with basics like a warm sleeping bag. Particularly those areas closer to the Himalaya and places tourists might come. This doesn't work if you aren't normal sizes and likely might not be the newest/lightest stuff, but my travels in similar areas suggests it can be found. The trick is how to find this in advance.

Hence, posting to a travel-related forum like Lonely Planet will likely dig up more specific knowledge.

I share djb's concern about using postal services unless you actually have familiarity (or local contact who can navigate the system).
Thanks for Lonely Planet reference.

We have the same concerns with the local postal service, not to mention custom regulations and wait times.
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Old 09-05-19, 01:00 PM
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Originally Posted by saddlesores View Post
more detail needed:

define the temperature ranges for hot, very hot, and cool/cold.

where in "central" asia? 'tis a big place, with many local variations in gear availability, customs fees, shipping times, and "tea money" required to expedite things.

what gear do you absolutely require that could not be covered using local clothing and equipment?
We are expecting temperatures between 40+C to -10C. The hot parts will be in Uzbekistan while the cold parts in Kyrgyzstan.
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Old 09-05-19, 02:29 PM
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well.... -10 is cold enough to warrant serious planning.


Any way you look at this, at some point you'll have to carry all this cold weather gear. Shopping as you go, thru the stans, is unlikely to provide much options, and shipping there is probably not simple. So I'd personally carry all that is needed, from the start. -10 means a down vest, 3-4 layers (i.e. you wear most of your tops), leggings, a warmer sleeping bag, a thicker sleeping pad, mitts, shoe covers, toque. I'd venture to say, 4kg/10L. Fairly insignificant.


OTOH, riding with a felt jacket purchased roadside, may be a priceless memory... Post pictures
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Old 09-05-19, 02:58 PM
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yup, I commute at -10c, but not for long, and find folks who bike tour in such weather to be very hardy souls indeed.
So Mr or Mrs Singh, are your bikes good and solid? Will you have the space in panniers for all the bulky winter clothing, and the usual extra space for food, water and all that stuff that such a tough trip will require?

what is the route plan?
when is the trip planned ish?

lots of questions, but an exciting trip thats for sure. Definately, lots of planning and logistics required.
I recommend at least 2in 45-50mm wide tires for all the rough roads you will encounter.

Oh, in case you do not know of this website--check out Crazy Guy on a bike, there are many trip journals of people who have ridden through the "stans", and will give you lots and lots of very good information on all aspects of travelling there.

good luck with your planning and prep.
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Old 09-06-19, 06:48 AM
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Originally Posted by gauvins View Post
well.... -10 is cold enough to warrant serious planning.
Since I have no knowledge of your locale this may be of limited or maybe no use, so feel free to ignore if it isn't helpful.

kind of depends. Is that a rare overnight low or will you actually need to be riding in those temperatures? If it is a once or twice in the trip overnight low and maybe a morning or two of cold riding I'd get by with my summer gear and wear everything I had along if necessary or even take a morning off here or there. If that is a normal daytime high temperature that is another matter entirely.

I figure I can get by with my warm weather gear when the daytime highs are generally 50F (10C) or above even when the overnight lows get into the teens once in a while and hit freezing regularly. When it is regularly freezing all day and 0F (-15C) at night that definitely requires entirely different gear for me. I'd either have to carry a little heavier gear the whole trip or manage to supplement or swap somewhere along the way. I'd think clothing might be easy enough to just buy some more no matter what country you are in. Your sleeping bag may be harder. Taking a warmer bag from the start, managing to get a swap for a warmer one, or getting an over bag somehow would seem to be the options.
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Old 09-06-19, 07:22 AM
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Originally Posted by staehpj1 View Post
Your sleeping bag may be harder. Taking a warmer bag from the start, managing to get a swap for a warmer one, or getting an over bag somehow would seem to be the options.
I've done this twice on tour.

First time was in Western China where October overnight temperatures were cooler than I anticipated. In Turpan, I bought a lightweight Chinese sleeping bag as an over-bag to use around the sleeping bag I already had. Later on the same trip, I also bought warmer set of gloves for similar reason.

Second time was in Peru. I had planned for temperatures down to -5C overnight but as I started reading some of the blogs of those crossing Bolivia, they reported overnight temperatures in range of -10C to -15C. I met a German couple near Nazca and in my conversations with them, they offered their lightweight extra bag. I took them up on the offer. If I hadn't found a bag there, I'm pretty sure I could have bought a lightweight bag in Arequipa.

In both cases, the extra outer bag worked fine and gave me a little extra range. I'm 6' 4" and hence an overbag is an easier alternative than finding a new bag that is both large and warm.

In my travels through Russia, I recall Irkutsk having a large number of outdoor and adventure stores. Given that and the populations of some of the capital cities in Central Asia as well as proximity to the Pamirs and other mountain ranges - and people coming to adventures there - I'm guessing it is fairly likely to find local alternatives. The trick is being able know this with enough confidence in advance and hence reaching out on travel forums.

In addition to knowing temperature ranges, it is useful to figure out the day/night swing. For example, some dry continental climates can have a pretty wide swing so if you can deal with overnight temperatures then daytime doesn't need to be as warm. On the other hand, some higher mountain passes can have inclement weather even mid-summer and hence need to anticipate being caught in an infrequent summer storm.
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Old 09-08-19, 09:03 AM
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Thanks everyone for the suggestions/anecdotes. We currently live in Toronto but are originally from Montreal. We ride year round and have been doing so for some years, like most people in these parts we seem to have have clothing for every 10 decrees change in temperature.😀
It looks like for this trip we'll be buying as we go, that seems to be the easiest, safest and most hassle free way to go, and yeah a good way to pick souvenirs ( thanks gauvins).
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Old 09-22-19, 11:55 AM
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As many have recommended you can buy stuff on the road as needed, however don't forget to discard stuff as you go along. If feasible you can mail the no longer required stuff home, or simply donate it along the way. I for one don't bother mailing stuff home, since postage often exceeds the value of what is being mailed.
You should be careful about giving stuff away. In some cultures, especially in some parts of central Asia, giving someone a gift may impose on them unreasonable reciprocal obligations.

I don't know what your route is, but if you are planning to entre Uzbekistan from Beyneu, the road to the border is ~90km of corduroy dirt road, at least last summer it was. Once you've crossed into Uzbekistan, a painless process btw, it's ~150 km of nothingness on a terrible road, before any settlement. Bring shade, as there is none, and bring all the water you can possibly carry, I carried 14 lt of water. Also make sure you have good lights, you'll be traveling a lot at night, daytime temps in the 40's C are the norm.
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Old 09-22-19, 04:21 PM
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Originally Posted by pjsingh View Post
Thanks everyone for the suggestions/anecdotes. We currently live in Toronto but are originally from Montreal. We ride year round and have been doing so for some years, like most people in these parts we seem to have have clothing for every 10 decrees change in temperature.😀
It looks like for this trip we'll be buying as we go, that seems to be the easiest, safest and most hassle free way to go, and yeah a good way to pick souvenirs ( thanks gauvins).
I bring a down vest and a thin stocking cap on all of my trips. I find that the down vest is very versatile, if I am slightly chilled in the evening I can put that on but I might still we wearing shorts and short sleeves in the campsite. But a down vest under a rain jacket can be quite warm when it gets colder. It certainly would not be adequate for the minus 10 degree C conditions that you anticipate, but it could be a good item to have in the transition zones. I remember even wearing my down vest in the Florida Everglades when I was there in Feb 2017 in the evening after sunset.

I started using a sleeping bag liner several years ago, for one thing I found that it can be quite nice in hot weather to function as a sleeping bag by itself. Or I can use the liner in warmer weather while I am partly in the warmer rated sleeping bag. Some people think a liner makes a sleeping bag warmer but I do not think it helps much in that regard. I mostly like to have it to give me a wider range of temperatures.


When I ride in cooler weather, I find that a neck gaiter can be very warm, but it packs down to nearly nothing. For cycling in colder weather I have some long finger gloves that can be converted to mitts. I find these gloves are really nice to have in cold rain. I think mine are four or five years old now. These have no padding on the palms but that means they dry out faster after a rainy day and they pack down to almost no volume at all. But these would not be good enough below freezing, you would need something else for that.
https://www.planetx.co.uk/i/q/CLPXHW...le-race-gloves
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Old 09-23-19, 04:45 AM
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A simple "neck up" as we call them, certainly makes a real difference in stopping cold air gong around neck.
I use a balaclava at a certain point also, as most winter activity people do.

Re hands. As you guys ride in winter, you probably use these, but I have an old pair of mitt shells, ie no insulation, that I put over various gloves or mitts, and cut the wind it makes all the difference for hand warmth.
I layer different stuff inside, but main advantage is that they pack flat and weigh very little.
Bought them at mec ages ago.

I've seen folks using those poggie things, for winter riding, attached to bars and you slip hands into.
Bulky but effective I imagine.

But you have to take into account space and weight....

Ps, ortlieb make oversize rear panniers, 70 litres I believe, great for bulky but not super heavy stuff.

Hey, you never said what bikes, does that mean you don't have them yet or undecided?

Have you toured before?
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Old 09-23-19, 05:28 AM
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Originally Posted by djb View Post
Re hands. As you guys ride in winter, you probably use these, but I have an old pair of mitt shells, ie no insulation, that I put over various gloves or mitts, and cut the wind it makes all the difference for hand warmth.
I layer different stuff inside, but main advantage is that they pack flat and weigh very little.
Bought them at mec ages ago.
These are the shells that I use over my gloves:

https://www.aerostich.com/clothing/g...it-covers.html

Very compact, keeps my hands dry in the rain unlike my Showers Pass-THROUGH gloves, and work almost as well as my Bar Mitts at keeping my hands warm in cold weather.
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Old 09-23-19, 06:49 AM
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Originally Posted by GadgetGirlIL View Post
These are the shells that I use over my gloves:

https://www.aerostich.com/clothing/g...it-covers.html

Very compact, keeps my hands dry in the rain unlike my Showers Pass-THROUGH gloves, and work almost as well as my Bar Mitts at keeping my hands warm in cold weather.
mine are literally decades old, maybe 20 years old. They are simple and just one layer of Goretex that doesnt gore much anymore for rain, but as a wind block, they are fantastic. Same long length as yours, which keep my arms warmer also.
They made all the diff for winter riding, and depending on what I wear inside, I can be comfortable outside down to -30c, but for riding, just make it so much nicer at -10c with reasonable sized fleece mitts and glove liners underneath.
Have kept them in my winter jacket for years when downhill skiing also, put them on for a cold slow chairlift ride up so my hands arent so cold, and again, as they are not thick, they fold up together nicely flat in a jacket pocket.

if I were to go bike touring with cold temps like these guys are thinking of doing, I would take these hands down (sic)
One can always buy more mitts or whatever most places, but not these.
Heck, in Mexico a year and a half ago, it was unusually cold at the start of a trip and I bought a toque and gloves, was not expecting nights of 5c and cool riding, but was easy to buy them.

as commuters, these people are surely very aware of what works for them at given temps, and know what things make all the diff for their personal comfort. Thats the trick, to have riding experience in given temps so you know what works and what you can or cant live with comfort wise.

Everyone is diff, but I'm a slight fellow, and hate being cold....
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