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Modernizing a Classic: 1984 Trek 760

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Modernizing a Classic: 1984 Trek 760

Old 08-05-19, 08:59 PM
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ridethecliche
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Modernizing a Classic: 1984 Trek 760

It's funny to be back here all these years later, but here goes.

I bought an 84 trek 760 used in 2007 or so when I was in college. I built that bike up and raced it for a short time, then built it up as a single speed to enjoy. Then I worked in boston for a few years and rode it around like that. Then I started medical school and it sat. And sat. And...

I just started residency. I finally decided to sell my old 'race' bike, a CAAD9 with DA7800 and neuvation wheels and got a pittance for the setup when I put it up. I really should have parted it out but so it goes... I'm still left with the trek that's still sitting in single speed trim. I'm in the market for a 'new to me' bike with a more endurance oriented geometry but I figure... why not try setting this up to be a fun longer distance bike?

So here I am again. I hope you'll humor me and answer a few questions.

1) If I were to put on a carbon fork, what should I be looking for? Any suggestions?
I've had back surgery in the past and I'm looking to smooth out the ride a bit. There's nothing wrong with the current fork per-se, but it may be nice to do this. I remember there used to be a few options.

2) Is there anything I need to know for compatibility other than the fact that the BB is a 68mm english thread? FD should be a 28.6mm clamp, correct?

Thanks for any help.... it's been a while. I think it would be really nice to build this back up just to enjoy it!
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Old 08-05-19, 09:23 PM
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If you really must put on a carbon fork, the best option would be a Wound Up composite fork. They will do a steel threaded 1-inch steerer for you so you can use your original headset if desired.

Close 2nd would be a 1" Columbus carbon fork. These are very nice. You'll have to change the headset to a 1" threadless because these only come in threadless (I used a 1" threadless Cane Creek 100 when I did a similar conversion on a 90s Litespeed).

If you want my true opinion, it's leave the steel fork on there. Whatever "absorptive" properties carbon has I really highly doubt it will make a perceptible difference in ride quality. Pretty much marketing speak. I've never noticed being any more comfortable on the 3 carbon forks I've had (a Wound Up with steel steerer, a Columbus with full carbon steerer, and a Salsa with alloy steerer).

The rest of it should be compatible with modern components. Make sure your rear dropout spacing is at least 126mm if you want to use a new 130mm cassette hub. A 1984 bike might have narrower spacing and need to be spread. You will probably also have brake mounting holes for nutted brakes instead of recessed nut, so that will also need to be changed if you want to use modern brakes, unless you get a Tektro with nutted mounting.
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Old 08-05-19, 09:27 PM
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I think you would be better served running fatter tires, but I am pretty sure you are going to be limited by the frame.
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Old 08-05-19, 09:36 PM
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a consideration....carbon is generally stiff, comparatively

years ago, i had an '82 trek 614. the main frame was reynolds 531 while the stays and fork were ishiwata magny 10 manganese. one day i was comparing my ride with a friend and his bianchi 80's model. both of us were surprised at the difference in forks. his was notably stiffer while mine you could actually see flex a bit absorbing road shock. the level of comfort in the differing material made me really appreciate what i had....though it wasn't the columbus tubed italian bianchi he had, if you know what i mean. iow's, maybe consider a different steel fork (and, paint to match)? my trek's fork had an offset of 55mm while yours likely has less. that can make a difference in comfort, too. ebay has used forks all the time
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Old 08-05-19, 09:40 PM
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Originally Posted by TenGrainBread View Post
If you really must put on a carbon fork, the best option would be a Wound Up composite fork. They will do a steel threaded 1-inch steerer for you so you can use your original headset if desired.

Close 2nd would be a 1" Columbus carbon fork. These are very nice. You'll have to change the headset to a 1" threadless because these only come in threadless (I used a 1" threadless Cane Creek 100 when I did a similar conversion on a 90s Litespeed).

If you want my true opinion, it's leave the steel fork on there. Whatever "absorptive" properties carbon has I really highly doubt it will make a perceptible difference in ride quality. Pretty much marketing speak. I've never noticed being any more comfortable on the 3 carbon forks I've had (a Wound Up with steel steerer, a Columbus with full carbon steerer, and a Salsa with alloy steerer).

The rest of it should be compatible with modern components. Make sure your rear dropout spacing is at least 126mm if you want to use a new 130mm cassette hub. A 1984 bike might have narrower spacing and need to be spread. You will probably also have brake mounting holes for nutted brakes instead of recessed nut, so that will also need to be changed if you want to use modern brakes, unless you get a Tektro with nutted mounting.
Thanks for the info.

For the fork, it's a mix between wanting things to be a bit more solid as well as comfortable. I used to weigh 145-155lbs in college in 'race' weight and weigh 170-180 right now depending on how much I've been lifting. The reynolds 531P tubing is a bit... errrr... squishy. I guess I can always use it for now.

So these are the options:
1) https://www.performancebike.com/ritc...59-630/p310356
2) http://www.henryjames.com/minimal-ca...r-painted.html

I've fit a 10 speed rear in there before. It requires spreading things a bit, but I never had any issues doing so myself. I never got the rear triangle respaced.

I also already have 'modern' 105 brakes on there circa mid 2000 level kit so I should be good for brakes.

I've also semi toyed with the idea of selling the bike either as is or as a frame, but I feel like it would be really nice to set it back up as a geared bike for distance riding again.

On the note of tires, I have 28's on now. It looks like I could still go bigger so maybe a 30 or 32 would fit as well depending on the tire. 28 is decent enough though!

Last edited by ridethecliche; 08-05-19 at 09:45 PM.
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Old 08-05-19, 09:45 PM
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I run a 1" carbon fork with carbon steerer, threadless of course.
Have not checked what is available these days in 1". Definitely not main stream.
The problem could be with rake. You want to be close to the original or handling geometry changes.
That could be …. good or bad or just different, based on your expectations.
Carbon fork will be stiffer
and you need a new stem (assuming steel threaded steerers aren't available)
possibly one that rises to accommodate any back issues.
And handlebar clamping needs to be considered, that has changed if going threadless.
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Old 08-05-19, 09:55 PM
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Originally Posted by CV-6 View Post
I think you would be better served running fatter tires, but I am pretty sure you are going to be limited by the frame.
A 650B wheel set with 38 tires and Tektro 559 brakes would probably fit and do much more than a carbon fork for comfort.
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Old 08-05-19, 09:55 PM
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I believe that this is the geometry chart. Fork 'offset' is listed at 38. Is that the same as rake?




This is the bike in question:

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Old 08-05-19, 10:00 PM
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Here's the last time I started a thread kinda sorta like this one:

https://www.bikeforums.net/classic-v...rst-build.html

And here's the SS/FG conversion:

https://www.bikeforums.net/singlespe...rst-ss-fg.html

Last edited by ridethecliche; 08-05-19 at 10:09 PM.
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Old 08-05-19, 10:31 PM
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Originally Posted by TenGrainBread View Post
If you really must put on a carbon fork, the best option would be a Wound Up composite fork. They will do a steel threaded 1-inch steerer for you so you can use your original headset if desired.

Close 2nd would be a 1" Columbus carbon fork. These are very nice. You'll have to change the headset to a 1" threadless because these only come in threadless (I used a 1" threadless Cane Creek 100 when I did a similar conversion on a 90s Litespeed).

If you want my true opinion, it's leave the steel fork on there.
+1 on staying with steel for an old bike.

I checked Wound Up's website, plugged in 1" with threaded steel steerer under Road Forks, and it feedback 'No product to match your description'. I saw prices starting in the $300+ range, so not sure of the cost. Maybe I missed something, I didn't go to every product page looking for 1".
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Old 08-05-19, 10:39 PM
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The columbus and ritchey fork appear to be in the $250 range. Slightly more than I'd like, though I may go back to that in the future. The short term goal is to get the bike together again so it can be ridden. Hopefully, I can offload some stuff that's on it now to get things together in the end. Hoping I can pick up some 10 speed stuff so I can use the wheels I have and/or pick some used stuff up cheap.
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Old 08-05-19, 10:43 PM
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Be aware that a carbon fork is probably going to be deeper at the crown. In other words the bottom of the of the crown that your tire has to clear is lower - less clearance or the fork is longer, raising the front of the bike that amount and lowering the head tube angle, slightly altering the bikes handling and pushing your position on the bike back and handlebars up.

Another alternative would be to have a local framebuilder make you a steel fork. That's fun. You get the stiffness you want, the handling you want and you get as a bonus to be able to pick the fork crown and make a statement. (Here you could see if there is a crown that is shallower and allows a bigger tire.) Braze-on choices are endless. 650B brake mounts or just threaded bosses so you can mount them. Racks, generator, fenders, a sheath for your sword, the choices go on forever.

I'd ride the fork you've got and take notes on what you would like different. Quicker or slower steering? Stiffness? Are there reasons you would like to go threadless or stay threaded? (I love that threaded allows quill stems that allow real changes of height very easily. That change can be made minutes before riding. No torque wrench required. Quill stems are almost all a lot easier to eyeball alignment with the front wheel too. I have a bike that I have two "cockpits" for. Two very different handlebar/stem/brake levers/brake calipers. Turns the bike into a completely different ride in 5 minutes. But if you wanted say to be able to use tow or three stems with the same bars, shifters and brakes, threadless would make that far easier.)

Take your time and enjoy the process! This can be a lot of fun.

Ben
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Old 08-05-19, 10:45 PM
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man, if you really want carbon, keep checking ebay. i see them fairly regular like off and on in my searches for steel (hehe) 1" forks. i've seen some really nice ones, too. carbon, that is
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Old 08-05-19, 10:46 PM
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OP, you asked about "fork offset" and "rake". Yes, what Trek is calling offset is simply rake. You can see it on the diagram.

Edit: but it is worth checking the actual rake on your fork. Those catalogs typically are printed long before the bikes are made and changes often happen.

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Last edited by 79pmooney; 08-05-19 at 10:50 PM.
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Old 08-05-19, 10:57 PM
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x2 on axle to crown height in regards to an acquired carbon fork vs your original. it will effect the handling. i believe 2cm's of height difference is enough to effect the head tube angle 1 degree.

as well, the greater the offset/rake the quicker the handling will be. if your original fork is indeed only 38mm, many aftermarket forks i've seen have around 45mm.

a threadless headset set up will also feel a bit stiffer. quills have a tendency to flex with road shock
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Old 08-05-19, 11:18 PM
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You guys are correct that the current fork will likely allow for using wider tires. While a carbon fork was my original goal for this bike a decade ago when I got it, I'd be pretty happy to figure out just getting it riding again.

I'm kicking myself for not just parting out my cannondale now. I think the DA 7800 would have been pretty great on this. I'll have to start collecting parts again. Would be nice to find a decent wheelset and groupset for this. Maybe I'll hit up the classifieds here as well.

Onwards to parts hoarding!
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Old 08-06-19, 04:06 AM
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I know what it's like to get such an idea in your head---in this case, the need for a new carbon fork---but, that said, you'll improve the comfort of the ride just as much by simply double-wrapping the handlebars with cork tape.
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Old 08-06-19, 06:21 AM
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I'll give you an alternate idea. Keep the steel fork. Use a threaded-to-threadless stem converter, and a threadless stem coupled with a modern carbon road bar. Those can have varied flex that will absorb road buzz and offer you some varied hand positions.


Note the sculptured contour on the outer curve. Very comfortable. Plus, this will allow you to run the cabling internally, cleaning up the appearance. Anyway, who doesn't like to have options?
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Old 08-06-19, 06:35 AM
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Originally Posted by S28546 View Post
A 650B wheel set with 38 tires and Tektro 559 brakes would probably fit and do much more than a carbon fork for comfort.
Now I feel sort of dumb for not mentioning that as I am doing 650b on a 700c frame as I write this. There might be some howls of protest against doing 650b on a "racing" frame, though.
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Old 08-06-19, 07:37 AM
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I had one of these about 8 - 9 years ago. It wasn't a bad bicycle by any means. It was light and the frame was nicely finished, but I simply didn't enjoy riding it as much as I did riding other bikes that I had. The frame geometry and (lack of) fittings made the frame suitable for racing, and I had other, more comfortable bikes that I made better time on than I did on that Trek.

I do get the power of sentimentality, (I have a fleet of 1970's Raleighs of nearly every conceivable model to prove it) but a bike that's built with such a single purpose in mind truly limits your options, and is going to be more costly to modify than it would be to simply find another bike that better suits what you want it for. I've gone that route as well, so I'm simply offering perspective - not trying to push my viewpoint on you. I am simply suggesting that you may benefit from giving equal consideration to the option of what it would take to get you the bike that starts off meeting whatever your riding needs and desires are - as opposed to willing your beloved 760 to be "more suitable" for you.
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Old 08-06-19, 07:57 AM
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Congrats, you’ve come a long way baby. Sell the Trek and get a Surly, prob a LHT. Build it, put fatties on it and ride. You’re welcome.
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Old 08-06-19, 08:17 AM
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Originally Posted by jethin View Post
Sell the Trek and get a Surly, prob a LHT
LHT is a nice touring bike but spending $1300 on a new touring bike when there is an abundance of cheap and capable vintage tourers and mountain bikes around is beyond me.
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Old 08-06-19, 08:19 AM
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Originally Posted by CV-6 View Post
Now I feel sort of dumb for not mentioning that as I am doing 650b on a 700c frame as I write this. There might be some howls of protest against doing 650b on a "racing" frame, though.
I know I suggested trying a 650b conversion, but i assumed you were limited to a 25mm 700 tire. I missed the part where you mentioned having a 28, and thought a 30 or 32 might fit.

I have a 83 510 which was spec’d with 28s. I can fit a 35 without rubbing.

It’s not a flashy as spending $$$ on a fork or 650 wheel set, but a nice 32 might give you all the comfort you’d want from a new fork.
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Old 08-06-19, 08:29 AM
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Originally Posted by TenGrainBread View Post
LHT is a nice touring bike but spending $1300 on a new touring bike when there is an abundance of cheap and capable vintage tourers and mountain bikes around is beyond me.
I hear you, but there's something to be said for getting a modern frame that's compatible with contemporary components, well designed, in good/new condition and basically good to go out of the box. Even if one bought a brand new LHT if you ride it for ten years it's a good investment. I think they look pretty classic too.

Modding a 760 to be a "tourer" isn't a good idea IMHO. But hey, to each their own.
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Old 08-06-19, 08:34 AM
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Originally Posted by jethin View Post
I hear you, but there's something to be said for getting a modern frame that's compatible with contemporary components, well designed, in good/new condition and basically good to go out of the box. Even if one bought a brand new LHT if you ride it for ten years it's a good investment. I think they look pretty classic too.

Modding a 760 to be a "tourer" isn't a good idea IMHO. But hey, to each their own.
The OP wants to put a carbon fork and newer Dura Ace on his bike. I think you're the first one to bring up the idea of making his Trek into a tourer
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