Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Road Cycling
Reload this Page >

Beginner: Bike Purchasing Advice Needed

Notices
Road Cycling “It is by riding a bicycle that you learn the contours of a country best, since you have to sweat up the hills and coast down them. Thus you remember them as they actually are, while in a motor car only a high hill impresses you, and you have no such accurate remembrance of country you have driven through as you gain by riding a bicycle.” -- Ernest Hemingway

Beginner: Bike Purchasing Advice Needed

Old 05-14-20, 07:56 AM
  #1  
mlavery0
Newbie
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: May 2020
Posts: 5
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Beginner: Bike Purchasing Advice Needed

Hey everyone, I am brand new to this whole world of biking. I'm a runner who is looking to cross-train and enjoy biking. My main goal is to get a budget setup that I can do primarily do Zwift workouts to cross-train and take to the roads when I want to. I've purchased a Kurt Kinetic Road Machine Fluid Trainer for $90 (not Smart, but planning on buying the Kinetic InRide 3 Sensor when they get back on the market). Now the next big piece is the bike.

I've been searching marketplace for suitable road bikes and came across this BP Stealth Carbon Fiber. The size is right. Price listed is $280. From my limited research it seems like a reasonable price with good reviews. Would this be a good purchase for my needs? Are there any upgrades/changes I'd need to make for my goals? Thanks for any feedback!
mlavery0 is offline  
Old 05-14-20, 08:11 AM
  #2  
GlennR
Passing on your left
 
GlennR's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Long Island, New York, USA
Posts: 6,420

Bikes: Trek Emonda SLR, Sram eTap, Zipp 303

Mentioned: 28 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1678 Post(s)
Liked 687 Times in 360 Posts
Are you missing a zero?
https://www.roadbikereview.com/produ...alth-ocrr.html

I would avoid a triathlon bike unless you an on racing triathlons.
GlennR is offline  
Old 05-14-20, 08:55 AM
  #3  
maglia_grigia
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2020
Location: Glasgow, Scotland
Posts: 13

Bikes: Bianchi C2C Via Nirone 7

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5 Post(s)
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Anything new around the $280 is going to be entry level and possibly not be very robust for outdoor mileage.

2nd hand, you will likely get something serviceable that will
a) allow you to see if you 'get the bug'
b) hopefully not need much money spent on it
c) will also hold its value, if you decide to give up or upgrade within a year or so

Ultimately you will be getting a road bike that's fine for fitness and will likely last for years with a bit of care and maintenance, but will be a fair bit off a performance bike.
maglia_grigia is offline  
Old 05-14-20, 09:00 AM
  #4  
Metallifan33
Senior Member
 
Metallifan33's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2019
Location: Phoenix, AZ
Posts: 183

Bikes: Trek Domane SL 5

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 145 Post(s)
Liked 81 Times in 33 Posts
Originally Posted by mlavery0 View Post
Hey everyone, I am brand new to this whole world of biking. I'm a runner who is looking to cross-train and enjoy biking. My main goal is to get a budget setup that I can do primarily do Zwift workouts to cross-train and take to the roads when I want to. I've purchased a Kurt Kinetic Road Machine Fluid Trainer for $90 (not Smart, but planning on buying the Kinetic InRide 3 Sensor when they get back on the market). Now the next big piece is the bike.

I've been searching marketplace for suitable road bikes and came across this BP Stealth Carbon Fiber. The size is right. Price listed is $280. From my limited research it seems like a reasonable price with good reviews. Would this be a good purchase for my needs? Are there any upgrades/changes I'd need to make for my goals? Thanks for any feedback!
I was a runner and kept getting hurt so got into biking (pretty much the most common story).
I researched and decided on an endurance bike. Unless you are planning on doing triathlons, I'd stay away from tri-bikes or TT bikes. Even if you plan on racing, I'd go with an endurance bike to build... endurance Once you're up to snuff (getting used to the saddle etc.) and you have a bit of extra cash, you can specialize. In my case I'll always have the endurance bike.
Metallifan33 is offline  
Old 05-14-20, 09:02 AM
  #5  
Phil_gretz
Journeyman Bike Commuter
 
Phil_gretz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Alexandria, VA
Posts: 5,829

Bikes: '71 Jeunet 640, '74 Fuji Special Road Racer, '79 Peugeot PXN10LE, '88 Fuji Saratoga, '13 Motobecane Fantom29 HT, '16 Motobecane Turino Pro Disc, '16 Motobecane Gran Premio Elite, '18 Velobuild VB-R-022

Mentioned: 16 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 949 Post(s)
Liked 571 Times in 326 Posts
Ugh. Is your intention to ride triathlons? Then, maybe. This could work on a trainer because your sessions won't be that long. It will be unpleasant on the road, though. Why not a traditional aluminum road bike with mid-level components? That's where most people start. And up your budget to $900 to open more possibilities. Get a fitting from someone experienced. That person will be able to help you (1) select the correct frame size and (2)dial things (stem length, saddle position relative to pedals, saddle type) in on your trainer, so that you're not starting with something that is a ridiculously poor fit.
Phil_gretz is offline  
Old 05-14-20, 09:39 AM
  #6  
Maelochs
Senior Member
 
Maelochs's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Posts: 12,079

Bikes: 2015 Workswell 066, 2014 Dawes Sheila, 1983 Cannondale 500, 1984 Raleigh Olympian, 2007 Cannondale Rize 4, 2017 Fuji Sportif 1 LE

Mentioned: 141 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5778 Post(s)
Liked 420 Times in 279 Posts
Originally Posted by GlennR View Post
Are you missing a zero?
https://www.roadbikereview.com/produ...alth-ocrr.html

I would avoid a triathlon bike unless you an on racing triathlons.
Every place I have looked shows this bike being sold for more like $1280, or much more, frame only. If you can find one for $280 …. Buy it and sell it. Don’t ride it, it might be rally broken.

https://www.ebay.com/itm/bpStealth-C...-/172135209884
Buy it new: US $3,650.00 frame and fork
https://www.roadbikereview.com/produ...alth-ocrr.html
MSRP: $1500 Frame/Fork/Headset Only

And a tri-bike is about the hardest thing to ride in anything but a straight line on anything but a wind-less day. (“The wide frame makes handling tricky in high crosswinds" …. “Not really a weakness, but one should be aware of how high crosswinds can affect handling; due to the larger than average surface area of this frame.”)

Not clear what your budget is here … but Do Not buy used unless you either know a whole lot about bikes or can bring a buddy who does.

(“This is an extremely fast bike, but the thing that impresses me the most is the frame`s durability. At the risk of a dubious impression, the frame has stood up to three wrecks due to high speed close pack riding. I have had the frame inspected thoroughly, and no faults or cracks have shown. One of the wrecks occurred at more than 25 mph, and I couldn`t ride for over a month.”)

Yeah …. And after the fourth high-speed wreck, rather than have the frame inspected, he decided to sell it, perhaps.

Not every seller is going to tell you all that stuff ….. and you have no idea what “had the frame inspected thoroughly” means. He had a buddy tap it with a quarter listening for clunks? He had it sonogrammed? He had some guy look at it closely?

Best to buy new unless you really know bikes—IMO.

@Metallifan33 has the best idea—get an ordinary endurance-geometry road bike for training. You can ride it in competitions (at least at the beginner level) you can do all your training, you can throw it on the trainer, and you can take it out for relaxed weekend spins …. And you can keep it as a back-up when you buy a much better bike a couple seasons down the road, if you find you really like cycling.

And if you decided to focus on triathlons, you can slap on a set of clip-on aero bars for the first few …. And when you get a dedicated Tri-bike (if you do) you will appreciate having the regular bike for training.
@Phil_gretz also offers very sound advice about fitting, etc. Riding the wrong sized bike will either hurt so much you won’t want to, or will push you to ride through the pain and leave you needing knee surgery.

Best bet is almost always to go to a few bike shops and take some test rides, see what is available at what price point. You can get a decent idea of what size frame you might want that way too … and once you know what you want and in what size, you can ask if they have any used or leftover models—nothing wrong with saving cash.

Especially since you will need to buy accessories.
Maelochs is offline  

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.