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How many miles is a "good ride"?

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How many miles is a "good ride"?

Old 07-16-19, 06:06 PM
  #76  
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Originally Posted by SpinClassSara View Post
My goal each ride is to go over 10. If I hid 12 or 15, I'm ecstatic !!!!
Your location says NYC. Are you riding in the city? Seems like that would be thrilling.
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Old 07-16-19, 08:31 PM
  #77  
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Perfect ride.

Cycling is living riding life with joy...
Lets continue to blast life: ride a bike, live more fully!


Originally Posted by ThreadedSpoke View Post
Perfect advice, perfectly stated.
I'll second this advice, that maintining a balance between enjoying it while being eager to doing again the next day (or whatever you schedule allows) is a great place to start. As I like to say, "You be you".
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Old 07-17-19, 03:26 PM
  #78  
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Originally Posted by ucfdad View Post
Just starting to get into riding for fun and fitness. I am 58, 6'1 and 240 and a smoker with high blood pressure. So far in July I have ridden 60 miles in 7 rides. Somedays I can do 12 and some days I am struggling to do 8. When I tell a non cyclist I did 8 miles they are like "wow that is great". When I say I rode 8 to a cyclist, I get a much less positive reaction.


So, when first starting what should be considered a good ride? How much did you ride at the beginning?


Also, would love to hear from anyone who has a success story about lowering blood pressure through riding, need the inspiration.


Please no "quit smoking" comments, I have heard them all and agree with them. Thanks

First off - you are riding a reasonable distance for a smoker. You MUST stop smoking or heart and lung problems will get you if you don't watch out. As my father was dying from emphysema he asked me to quit. From 2 packs a day I stopped cold. One week later I couldn't stand it anymore and lit one up. It tasted just like the first cigarette I ever had. I gagged, stomped it out and never had another again.


Some people tell me I am unusual, but in fact I tried to stop smoking 100 times before that. It was just that simple request from my dying father that gave me the will-power to stop.


After you have stopped smoking you are stuck for a year at least allowing your system to clean out so you have to limit your riding to 25 miles or less. Most century rides have a half-metric which is usually less than that - around 25 miles.


You have to drink water constantly and be sure to have an energy bar now and again or else you feel so bad you might quit. Then there is this funny thing that happens. If you've been doing 15 miles and then do 25 miles you're likely to be totally exhausted. But the very next time you try 25 miles it seems a great deal easier. Then as you're increasing your mileage always be aware of your heart rate and blood pressure. If your ears are pounding and you can feel your heart rate in your eyes you are pushing too hard and it is time to rest. After many years my idea of resting is riding more slowly.


As you gain experience all of this becomes second nature. The important thing is that at your age you can still improve a great deal, very rapidly, as long as you're aware of what your body is telling you. A FAST ride is 20 K (12.5 miles). If you're riding longer distances you do not push yourself hard. Be careful riding with a group because they can push you beyond your limits before you're ready. But by all means DO ride with a group. They provide a very good means of judging your progress. Most areas have bike clubs and these clubs generally have a variety of rides for slow, moderate or fast riders. Bicyclists tend to be very sociable off of the bike and to damned aggressive on. Get used to that. At my age I finish last without a whim. I also notice that those guys that absolutely must go fast are all on blood thinners and pacemakers now.


Also start watching your diet. Be cautious not to overeat after a ride. Generally if you're really tired it is difficult to overeat but that depends on what you're eating and drinking. NO MORE soft drinks or more than a beer or two. A glass of wine with dinner and NO hard alcohol at all. I have noticed that they seem to have removed the advertising limitations on alcohol and hard liquor in particular is being advertised very hard. You are overweight and your smoking has weakened your heart. It is time to rebuild it all and so you have to take your own health in your own hands.


No sloppy hamburgers save every great once in awhile. OK to eat a SMALL portion of meat and a lot of vegetables. A lot of people I know are now of my age and are turning to vegetarians. I suspect this has to do with their teeth but nonetheless it wouldn't kill you. Learn to cook and kick the wife out of the kitchen. Most women tend to cook what their mothers did. (My God, save me from my mother's cooking!) Stay away from large amounts of anything but particularly fats and carbs.


Your proper weight is around 180-190 lbs and regardless what you think you can get there. Try steaming beets and after you can pierce them with a pairing knife easily, let them cool a little. You can use the back of the knife to rub the skins off. Slice and serve with chicken or chicken sausages. Some salt and something acid helps the rather bland taste. A little vinegar or lemon juice. For some reason beets makes your whole body sit up and take notice after a week or two of using them one way or another. Even Tour de France riders might be drinking a glass of beet juice every morning. Don't overdo that anymore than anything else but it might surprise you.


So the question shouldn't be "how long a ride" but "how to get into the riding lifestyle". At 75 I have the heart rate and blood pressure of a 25 year old. I have a garage full of bikes and one old car. I just got another touring bicycle to set up with a rack and panniers so that I can ride the 4 blocks to the grocery store or the sandwich shop and I have sport bikes up the kazoo. Now I'm in the position of trying to sell bikes to make room so that I can repair and improve those of the wife and kids. Back when, they rode across the USA as teenagers with my wife accompanying them and taking turns having to drive the old station wagon. The three daughters entered the Jr. Nationals and at least one of them got a 2nd in her age category. They rode there from the San Francisco bay area and it was being held in Denver.


Your entire social life and all your friends can revolve around your bike if you like. I was an electronics engineer and that was real high pressure stuff but with the bike on the weekends and Thursday evening in the summers I was in good shape. Every Thursday now that I'm retired I do a 50 miler. In the bay area here I have lots of climbing.


As I say - no one else is going to take care of you so that is something you have to do for yourself. Get a move on it.
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Old 07-19-19, 11:17 PM
  #79  
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You shall know a good ride, young grasshoppa', when you have one.

***
At 22, I was riding 500 to 600 miles a week in early summer to race. By 32 I had a sedentary desk job, by 42 middle age spread, by 52 high blood pressure, by 53 a heart attack and two stents. Happily at 64 now, blood pressure is normal, weight is down, cycling is back in my life, and life is good.

If you don't already have one, get yourself a decent blood pressure meter with an arm cuff. Make a morning ritual, daily record. Relax and gain awareness of changes. Follow your doctors advice, all of it. Adopt a heart healthy diet. Discuss changing drugs, lowering dosages if you have side effects.

btw, sanchan is just trying to help you. Clogged arteries can be more subtle that one would think. In hindsight, I wish someone had more bluntly warned me what comes next when I thought that all I had was high blood pressure. Putting myself at risk of a heart attack is one of the stupidest thing I've done (so far). High blood pressure is the wake-up call. You might get to push the snooze alarm once if you're lucky. I got away with it. I got a second chance. Not everyone is so lucky.

Once you get into shape, stay in shape. Don't slide backwards over the winter. Listen to your body, it will let you know when you've overdone it and when it's time to kick it up a notch (when you're bored). Add distance a little at a time and the mileage will pile up as if by magic. An ancient cycling tome said each day of riding adds a brick, but a day skipped removes a brick from the wall you are building. 58 is old enough that you might need more recovery time (days off) than when you were young, especially after a long ride. Sometimes a short easy ride is better than skipping a day, sometimes you just need a day off. And the day will come, sooner than you think, that 12 miles has become a short easy ride.

After you've knocked off some weight, you will round into better and better form, making it progressiively easier to lose the next pounds. You may hit a number of plateaus that take time to break past. Persevere. You're off to a good start with your rides so far. The simple fact that you know how many rides you've been on and how far you've gone is a good thing which you can expand on. Keep a log of your rides, cumulative mileage, weather, wildlife seen, how you felt, weight that morning, diet. Put lots of detail in there, and make it personal. New P.R., best time for a particular circuit or hill climb, longest distance ridden to date. It all helps you keep motivated. It may not seem important as you write down what now seems obvious and trivial, but on your 63rd and 68th birthdays, you will have fun looking back and seeing your progress over five and ten years. Or...forget all that and just ride and enjoy being in the moment. Whatever floats your boat.

Cycling is a long-haul endeavor. You will learn a lot about your body, other people, and nature.
The beauty of forums like this one is there's always something new to learn from other posters young and old.

--------------
"If you can walk away from a landing, it's a good landing.
If you use the airplane the next day, it's an outstanding landing." -C. Yeager

Don't know if Chuck Yeager really ever said that, but the same might be said about riding.
It's all about getting back in one peice and being able to go again the next day.
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Old 07-23-19, 05:36 PM
  #80  
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Do you feel good about your ride? Did it make you want to go again? Then it was a good ride.

Quit comparing yourself to other riders. The only comparison you should make is to your former self.


. . . and quit smoking
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Old 07-23-19, 05:55 PM
  #81  
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That many.
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Old 07-23-19, 06:12 PM
  #82  
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If what you're doing is enjoyment, then keep doing it. Even if you don't increase the distances like others, you ride your ride and be grateful you can. There are people here who may never do a forty mile ride and still enjoy the company they find at these forums. But they ride and they're better for it.
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Old 07-23-19, 08:02 PM
  #83  
Jim from Boston
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How many miles is a "good ride"?
Originally Posted by ucfdad View Post
Just starting to get into riding for fun and fitness… Somedays I can do 12 and some days I am struggling to do 8. When I tell a non cyclist I did 8 miles they are like "wow that is great". When I say I rode 8 to a cyclist, I get a much less positive reaction.

So, when first starting what should be considered a good ride? How much did you ride at the beginning?
Originally Posted by CliffordK View Post


Perhaps 200 miles in a day?
Originally Posted by downhillmaster View Post
16.4 miles is widely considered the standard for a good ride
Originally Posted by Jim from Boston View Post
I began reading this thread, piqued by the title, with an immediate quantitative answer in mind...

I have previously posted that I consider a “ride,” worthy of suiting up, going out, and warming up to be at least 10 miles (my one-way commute is 14). I consider a “good” (long) ride, e.g. on a weekend for training, or on a tour, to be at least 40 miles.
Originally Posted by SpinClassSara View Post
My goal each ride is to go over 10. If I hid 12 or 15, I'm ecstatic !!!!
Originally Posted by Rollfast View Post
That many.
Originally Posted by Biker395 View Post
A good ride is one you enjoy and return uninjured.
Originally Posted by freeranger View Post
To me, one of the things that indicate that it was a "good ride", is that it left me with a smile. The smiles are just as important as the miles!
Originally Posted by Brocephus View Post
If you're riding at all, then it is, by definition, "good" ! :thumb
Originally Posted by 1AvidCyclistCat View Post
Cycling is living riding life with joy...
Lets continue to blast life: ride a bike, live more fully!
Continuing this sentimental track in answer to the OP question, I have posted as a year-round cycle commuter to this thread “Being Able to Bike to Work Makes People Happy”:
Originally Posted by Jim from Boston View Post
Nonetheless, cycling is a joy, and not a chore. To paraphrase a saying* about walking:

"Now shall I walk, or shall I ride? / ‘Ride' Pleasure said; ‘Walk’ Joy replied." to

"Now shall I drive, or shall I ride? / ‘Drive' Pleasure said; ‘Ride’ Joy replied."

(*W.H. Davies, as quoted by Colin Fletcher in "The Complete Walker.":

"...Which of ye two
Will kindest be?
Pleasure laughed sweet,
But Joy kissed me
.")
Originally Posted by Maelochs View Post
Until they get to work ....
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Old 07-24-19, 03:58 AM
  #84  
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You’re doing great! Keep it up.
A good ride is on a bike
A bad ride is on a stretcher
A really bad ride is in a bag on a stretcher
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Old 07-24-19, 11:04 AM
  #85  
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A good ride for me used to be 35-50 miles. Last few years, it's 25-35 miles.
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Old 07-27-19, 06:55 AM
  #86  
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I agree with the above: any ride is a good ride.

After an unwelcome change to a sedentary job and two years of nagging health problems, sometimes I only have the time or energy for a five-mile ride. On those days even a five-mile ride is a good ride.
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Old 07-27-19, 09:35 AM
  #87  
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Originally Posted by Oldguyonoldbike View Post
I agree with the above: any ride is a good ride.

After an unwelcome change to a sedentary job and two years of nagging health problems, sometimes I only have the time or energy for a five-mile ride. On those days even a five-mile ride is a good ride.
Any way to add bike commuting to your routine?

Partial commute? Park and ride? Multi-modal bus?
Miles and benefits add up.
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Old 07-28-19, 12:13 PM
  #88  
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any and every ride. a bad day riding is better than a good day working. get out and ride........
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Old 07-31-19, 06:48 AM
  #89  
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I started riding again in 2010. I had moved to California and discovered that older white guys driving cheap clunkers were the only demographic the police still felt comfortable harassing. I scrapped my car and picked up a cheap POS mountain bike at a swap meet. I didn't have much interest in biking. I just had even less interest in walking.

I don't want to get overly dramatic but it probably saved my life. Until I got off my butt and started moving again I didn't realize how much my mobility was impaired by simple neglect and lack of exercise. I've since moved to the Philippines. Infrastructure here really isn't up to the load the local population is trying to put on it. Traffic seems to have gone directly from everybody walks to everybody owns a car or motorcycle. As a result, if you actually want to get somewhere in a hurry you need to ride a bicycle.

The limiting factor for me isn't the riding. I'm good for about two hours under tropical sun before I have a mild burn, enough to deepen my tan, not enough to blister or peel. My eyes are getting bad enough I don't willingly ride at night. I blew out my left knee about eight years ago. It healed, it doesn't hurt and has full range of motion but it also has the sensation joints get that tells you over stressing them would be a *really* bad idea. I picked up a shattered pelvis in a motorcycle wreck back in '85. Again, it's not something that has a large impact on my daily life but what I sit on and my posture is something I have to be aware of. High stress riding positions and "performance" saddles just ain't happening for me.

So, with all that as background and speaking strictly from my own personal experience, any ride at all is a "good ride". Today I did around 30km. There have been at least three other times in the last ten days when I did that much. Some days I did 5km or less. I don't keep a log so I can't tell for certain but if I had to give my best guess on a daily average it would be somewhere around 15-18km roughly 10-12 miles.
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Old 07-31-19, 07:19 AM
  #90  
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Pilots often define a good landing as one you can walk away from. Maybe the same thing can be said about a good bicycle ride.
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Old 07-31-19, 12:34 PM
  #91  
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Originally Posted by ucfdad View Post
Just starting to get into riding for fun and fitness. I am 58, 6'1 and 240 and a smoker with high blood pressure. So far in July I have ridden 60 miles in 7 rides. Somedays I can do 12 and some days I am struggling to do 8. When I tell a non cyclist I did 8 miles they are like "wow that is great". When I say I rode 8 to a cyclist, I get a much less positive reaction.

So, when first starting what should be considered a good ride? How much did you ride at the beginning?

Also, would love to hear from anyone who has a success story about lowering blood pressure through riding, need the inspiration.

Please no "quit smoking" comments, I have heard them all and agree with them. Thanks
Update 7/31/19: I have finished July with 21 rides for a total of 216.50 miles. Thanks for all the inspirational messages as well as your stories. More important than the miles is the fact that I enjoyed each ride whether is was the shortest 5.07 miles or the longest 15.2 mile twice.

Blood pressure has been steady around 124/65 which should make my cardiologist happy when I see him in September, maybe he will reduce my meds a little.

My wife says if I ride comparable miles in August and September, she will buy me a new bike for my October 1 birthday. I currently have a Trek Verve 3 and am looking at the Trek FX Sport 4 and the Specialized Sirrus Elite Alloy so if anyone has experience with these bikes or recommendations I would love to hear them.

Thanks again for the support!
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Old 07-31-19, 01:21 PM
  #92  
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Originally Posted by ucfdad View Post
Update 7/31/19: I have finished July with 21 rides for a total of 216.50 miles. Thanks for all the inspirational messages as well as your stories. More important than the miles is the fact that I enjoyed each ride whether is was the shortest 5.07 miles or the longest 15.2 mile twice.

Blood pressure has been steady around 124/65 which should make my cardiologist happy when I see him in September, maybe he will reduce my meds a little.

My wife says if I ride comparable miles in August and September, she will buy me a new bike for my October 1 birthday. I currently have a Trek Verve 3 and am looking at the Trek FX Sport 4 and the Specialized Sirrus Elite Alloy so if anyone has experience with these bikes or recommendations I would love to hear them.

Thanks again for the support!
OUTSTANDING, AWESOME, FANTASTIC !!!!

come 10/1 and enjoy the new ride. My wife got me the Roubaix Expert for my 67th B-day.
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Old 07-31-19, 02:23 PM
  #93  
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Originally Posted by CliffordK View Post
Any way to add bike commuting to your routine?

Partial commute? Park and ride? Multi-modal bus?
Miles and benefits add up.
I would love to commute by bike, but I haven't been able to figure out how to make it happen. I live in Norman, OK, about 20 miles south of Oklahoma City where I work. The distance would be fine, but there just isn't a bike-friendly route. There's an interstate and a couple of very heavily trafficked roads with curbs and no shoulder. I think I remember reading somewhere that Oklahoma City is, per capita, the most dangerous city in America for cyclists.
I've thought about the multi-modal option, but "unfortunately" the bus stop is only about two blocks from my house in Norman and stops right in front of the door where I work. I suppose I could always get off a few stops early, but then there are still the terrible streets.
I've opted for a trainer and Zwift instead. It's not perfect, but Zwift makes the trainer a little less boring. I'm trying to ride a couple of nights a week on Zwift, then decent real rides on the weekend. I'm on track to hit 2000 miles this year. Down quite a bit from yearly averages until a couple of years ago, but enough, I hope, to keep me in reasonable shape.
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Old 07-31-19, 02:43 PM
  #94  
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Originally Posted by Oldguyonoldbike View Post
I've thought about the multi-modal option, but "unfortunately" the bus stop is only about two blocks from my house in Norman and stops right in front of the door where I work. I suppose I could always get off a few stops early, but then there are still the terrible streets.
Is there an option for a bus stop a couple of miles in a different direction?

Arterials headed into town can be bad, but sometime cross-connector streets are not nearly as bad.

Of course, going sideways might not give much commuting benefit, but it might feel like it. Perhaps you can find a better bus line (giving at least some benefit).

I spend a lot of time on road shoulders. Sometimes wide, sometimes not so wide. There are a few that I tend to avoid except on weekends and late evenings, primarily because I have better alternatives.
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Old 07-31-19, 10:01 PM
  #95  
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Keep at it. When I first started road riding last year, a good ride for me was 6 miles. Now I'm up to 25 miles. It doesn't happen overnight.
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