Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Classic & Vintage
Reload this Page >

Painting 1977 frame: remove bb and other questions??

Notices
Classic & Vintage This forum is to discuss the many aspects of classic and vintage bicycles, including musclebikes, lightweights, middleweights, hi-wheelers, bone-shakers, safety bikes and much more.

Painting 1977 frame: remove bb and other questions??

Old 01-03-20, 07:25 AM
  #1  
ts99
Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jan 2020
Location: Central Pennsylvania
Posts: 46

Bikes: 1977 Trek

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 32 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 14 Times in 6 Posts
Painting 1977 frame: remove bb and other questions??

I resurrected my 1977 Trek, that I bought when I was 14, from 40 years in flooded basements. It actually looked pretty good until about 10 years ago but is now extremely rusty. I got it going and rode it this past summer and fall, including in two triathlons. Now I've stripped off almost everything and am going to paint it. A few questions:

Should I remove the bottom bracket? I think I can get it out, but it has no wiggle and feels pretty good, should I just leave it alone?

Likewise the bearing cups on the head tube. Remove them? Looks easy enough to remove if I buy or make the right tool, but will reinstalling them mess things up more than just leaving them?

Any other tips on paint? The original color is ice blue metallic. I want to match it EXACTLY if I can. A guy I met has an auto body shop and from my description thinks he can match it, but I might try it myself. I haven't found any spray can enamel paints that are close to it. I did find a quart of enamel on Amazon that looks like the right one, but I guess that would require finding a paint gun. I know nothing about painting such things. Advice?

btw, I already have the TREK and Reynolds 531 decals to put on it after painting.

Any advice would be appreciated.
ts99 is offline  
Old 01-03-20, 07:33 AM
  #2  
Phil_gretz
Journeyman Bike Commuter
 
Phil_gretz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Alexandria, VA
Posts: 5,826

Bikes: '71 Jeunet 640, '74 Fuji Special Road Racer, '79 Peugeot PXN10LE, '88 Fuji Saratoga, '13 Motobecane Fantom29 HT, '16 Motobecane Turino Pro Disc, '16 Motobecane Gran Premio Elite, '18 Velobuild VB-R-022

Mentioned: 16 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 947 Post(s)
Liked 563 Times in 323 Posts
Others will chime in on the technical aspects of painting, but I can tell you that you'll be glad that you removed both the bottom bracket bearing and the headset cups. It's less to mask, the results will be cleaner.

Painting a frame is an expensive proposition. I've done it and gotten reasonable results. I'm doing another frame over this winter and spring. Meticulous prep work is what you'll need. There are folks on this forum who are experts, they can advise on materials.
Phil_gretz is offline  
Old 01-03-20, 07:34 AM
  #3  
wrk101
Thrifty Bill
 
wrk101's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Mountains of Western NC
Posts: 22,597

Bikes: 86 Katakura Silk, 87 Prologue X2, 88 Cimarron LE, 1975 Sekai 4000 Professional, 73 Paramount, plus more

Mentioned: 78 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 901 Post(s)
Liked 300 Times in 226 Posts
Yes, you should remove BB and headset cups too. Then you need to find a local powder coater, or if you get a deal from the auto guy, take him up on it. The DIY option takes a lot of skill to do right. Better to hand if off. "I know nothing about painting such things" = hand it off.


Bottom brackets take routine maintenance, no matter how "smooth" it feels, grease gets OLD and no longer lubricates it properly. Then you do damage to the BB.


Powder coat is super durable and is usually cheaper than wet paint, and no more expensive than the stuff you will need to DIY.

Do yourself a favor, and list your LOCATION in your profile. Who knows, there may be someone local to you that can assist!!
wrk101 is offline  
Old 01-03-20, 09:07 AM
  #4  
ts99
Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jan 2020
Location: Central Pennsylvania
Posts: 46

Bikes: 1977 Trek

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 32 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 14 Times in 6 Posts
Originally Posted by Phil_gretz View Post
Others will chime in on the technical aspects of painting, but I can tell you that you'll be glad that you removed both the bottom bracket bearing and the headset cups. It's less to mask, the results will be cleaner.

Painting a frame is an expensive proposition. I've done it and gotten reasonable results. I'm doing another frame over this winter and spring. Meticulous prep work is what you'll need. There are folks on this forum who are experts, they can advise on materials.
Thanks. I'll work on the prep. Hopefully I can get the auto body guy to do it cheap, sounds like that's the way to go.

btw, how do you like your Motobecane Gran Premio? Did you get that from bikesdirect?

I started this project just to have a bike to ride. Turned into a passion to fix up my baby. Didn't want to spend more than $100. So much for that.

But I still need a modern bike with modern components, like index shifting, and don't have much money for it.
ts99 is offline  
Old 01-03-20, 09:08 AM
  #5  
ts99
Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jan 2020
Location: Central Pennsylvania
Posts: 46

Bikes: 1977 Trek

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 32 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 14 Times in 6 Posts
Originally Posted by wrk101 View Post
Do yourself a favor, and list your LOCATION in your profile. Who knows, there may be someone local to you that can assist!!
Good idea. I did that.
ts99 is offline  
Old 01-03-20, 09:28 AM
  #6  
Unca_Sam
The dropped
 
Unca_Sam's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2018
Location: Columbus, OH
Posts: 1,374

Bikes: Pake C'Mute Touring/Commuter Build, 1989 Kona Cinder Cone, 1995 Trek 5200

Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1025 Post(s)
Liked 429 Times in 312 Posts
Once you have enough posts to post photos, go ahead and do that!

I've 'restored' a beat up Kona Cinder Cone this summer, and I'm working on a Miyata 912 that was somehow worse (don't buy bikes with rust that used to live near the ocean). I opted to DIY, since I wanted to preserve as much of the paint and decals as possible. If that's not a concern of yours, I doubt you can do any better than media blasting the frame and painting it with whatever method you prefer. Tackling external frame rust is tedious at it's best, and you'll want to invest in the appropriate paint and wet/dry sandpaper for your best results. Your friend with the auto body shop is very likely able to match the paint with chips from his paint supplier, bring the bike to him and let him match the color that way. I usually use a rubbing compound or polish on some unblemished paint to clear away oxidation and grime for a best match. If your friend does good paint repair or know someone who does, absolutely ask for advice on a process to use if you're only repairing chips and minor rust.

I remove the bottom brackets as a matter of course. I've yet to see an older BB that didn't have the start of pitting in the cups, and BB shells are notorious for developing rust. I've noticed on both bikes that the headset cups also tended to promote rust at the edge of the head tube where the outside of the cup makes contact. Bottom brackets are simple enough to reinstall, though if it's damaged (pitting on the races) you might want to consider replacing the unit. The headset cups can be pressed back into place, though the tools are not something I would personally invest in. I live near a bicycle cooperative, which has the tools needed to punch the cups from the head tube and pull the crown race from the fork. If you're removing the paint and rust by media blasting and want to reuse the components, they MUST come off.

Last edited by Unca_Sam; 01-03-20 at 09:33 AM.
Unca_Sam is offline  
Old 01-03-20, 09:45 AM
  #7  
ts99
Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jan 2020
Location: Central Pennsylvania
Posts: 46

Bikes: 1977 Trek

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 32 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 14 Times in 6 Posts
Originally Posted by Unca_Sam View Post
Bottom brackets are simple enough to reinstall, though if it's damaged (pitting on the races) you might want to consider replacing the unit.
Would I have to hunt for a 1977 unit on ebay?
ts99 is offline  
Old 01-03-20, 10:18 AM
  #8  
Unca_Sam
The dropped
 
Unca_Sam's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2018
Location: Columbus, OH
Posts: 1,374

Bikes: Pake C'Mute Touring/Commuter Build, 1989 Kona Cinder Cone, 1995 Trek 5200

Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1025 Post(s)
Liked 429 Times in 312 Posts
Originally Posted by ts99 View Post
Would I have to hunt for a 1977 unit on ebay?
NO!

Bookmark Sheldon Brown's website. Your trek is about guaranteed to use British I.S.O. threads (1.37" x 24 will be stamped on the fixed cup on the right side of the bike). It was and still is the standard threading on US market bicycles, and it's very common. As long as you match the threading and the BB shell width (I'm going to guess yours is 68mm wide) the replacement will screw in like it's supposed to. While you can replace your headset, I'd recommend being very careful during removal, since headset standards have evolved more than threaded BBs and a replacement might be a step down in finish and quality.

Bottom brackets can be complicated, if they're esoteric or were cutting edge BITD. If you're trying to keep your bike 'period correct', sourcing a BB assembly on eBay is probably your best bet, unless you can find a coop and root around in their parts bins for a replacement part. There's nothing wrong with updating the components that are worn out if you want a bike that works and you're not worried about keeping it 'period correct'.

Last edited by Unca_Sam; 01-03-20 at 10:26 AM.
Unca_Sam is offline  
Old 01-03-20, 10:29 AM
  #9  
mstateglfr 
Sunshine
 
mstateglfr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: Des Moines, IA
Posts: 10,438

Bikes: '18 class built steel roadbike, '19 Fairlight Secan, '87 Schwinn Prelude, Black Mountain Cycles Monstercross V4, '89 Novara Trionfo, '18 Diamondback Syncr

Mentioned: 94 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4075 Post(s)
Liked 1,049 Times in 672 Posts
yup- another vote for remove everything that is removable from the frame. You can better sand down/strip the old paint this way, and it also allows you to properly prep the frame. You will want to remove all rust, so having the BB threads exposed is good.

Hours of prep make for easier and better painting- regardless of if you do the painting or pay someone. ALL rust should be removed with emory cloth and/or a chemical bath. If you paint it, use something that preps the steel(primer, etcher, etc. there are multiple options) and then apply the paint over the prep'd frame. It will look better and be more consistent.
mstateglfr is online now  
Old 01-03-20, 10:37 AM
  #10  
mstateglfr 
Sunshine
 
mstateglfr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: Des Moines, IA
Posts: 10,438

Bikes: '18 class built steel roadbike, '19 Fairlight Secan, '87 Schwinn Prelude, Black Mountain Cycles Monstercross V4, '89 Novara Trionfo, '18 Diamondback Syncr

Mentioned: 94 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4075 Post(s)
Liked 1,049 Times in 672 Posts
Originally Posted by ts99 View Post
Would I have to hunt for a 1977 unit on ebay?
A much simpler approach will be to buy a new bottom bracket off ebay that is the same length as your current one.

I have used these on a few bikes- they are cheap but have been perfectly fine. One is on a bike of mine, two are on bikes my kids use, and I have used a couple for refurbish bikes that I then sell. They https://www.ebay.com/itm/Bike-Bottom...0deec771c8b2f7

Or this is a perfectly fine solution too- https://www.ebay.com/itm/Tange-Ln-39...FH4MpzAc8nw7-g

Cartridge bottom brackets are easy to install and remove(that driveside of old cup n cone BBs can be brutal!).
Some dislike 'new' tech such as cartridge BBs, but they have been around for decades. Hardly new. I dont like throwing out good working stuff, but some things are worth $15 to simplify.
mstateglfr is online now  
Old 01-03-20, 10:49 AM
  #11  
ts99
Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jan 2020
Location: Central Pennsylvania
Posts: 46

Bikes: 1977 Trek

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 32 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 14 Times in 6 Posts
Originally Posted by Unca_Sam View Post
NIf you're trying to keep your bike 'period correct', sourcing a BB assembly on eBay is probably your best bet, unless you can find a coop and root around in their parts bins for a replacement part. There's nothing wrong with updating the components that are worn out if you want a bike that works and you're not worried about keeping it 'period correct'.
Thanks. I don't care about it being period correct, I just want to keep as much original as I can and spend the least money I can while still making it nice. It currently has walmart saddle from about 10 years ago, which is super comfortable, but I'm going to replace it with a modern saddle that looks close enough to the suede saddle it originally came with. I have no need to get a 1977 Brooks saddle to be period correct or something. Certainly don't care about being period correct on things you can't see. This summer l replaced the front derailleur, which broke, with a 70s one off ebay and replaced the 13-21 suntour freewheel with a 14-28 1970s suntour freewheel (I weigh twice as much as when I bought it and those hills are tough with the smallest gear being 42/21), but that's just because I knew they'd fit and they were cheap.

This bike is one of the few times in my life I got EXACTLY what I wanted. I pored over the Trek brochure for months, went to the bike shop a few days a week, and it was a semi-custom deal in those days, you could even specify frame components. So I'm kinda trying to get back to that.

I want to buy a modern bike too for riding. I'd rather do that than try to build out the old girl with new wheels and components and stuff.
ts99 is offline  
Old 01-03-20, 10:56 AM
  #12  
ts99
Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jan 2020
Location: Central Pennsylvania
Posts: 46

Bikes: 1977 Trek

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 32 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 14 Times in 6 Posts
Originally Posted by mstateglfr View Post
A much simpler approach will be to buy a new bottom bracket off ebay that is the same length as your current one.

I have used these on a few bikes- they are cheap but have been perfectly fine. One is on a bike of mine, two are on bikes my kids use, and I have used a couple for refurbish bikes that I then sell. They
Or this is a perfectly fine solution too-

Cartridge bottom brackets are easy to install and remove(that driveside of old cup n cone BBs can be brutal!).
Some dislike 'new' tech such as cartridge BBs, but they have been around for decades. Hardly new. I dont like throwing out good working stuff, but some things are worth $15 to simplify.
Thanks. I've put those in my ebay cart and will likely get one of them (I'm not link-worthy yet, so I deleted the links from my post). I guess I'd feel more feeling of accomplishment if I repacked the old bearings, and I may still do that, but I'm all for a $15 solution that works. I'll pull out the old and look at it.
ts99 is offline  
Old 01-03-20, 10:59 AM
  #13  
ryansu 
Ride.Smile.Repeat
 
ryansu's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Seattle WA
Posts: 2,586

Bikes: 2009 Handsome Devil, 1987 Trek 520 Cirrus, 1978 Motobecane Grand Touring, 1987 Nishiki Cresta GT, 1989 Specialized Allez Former bikes; 1986 Miyata Trail Runner, 1979 Miyata 912, 2011 VO Rando, 1999 Cannondale R800, 1986 Schwinn Passage

Mentioned: 71 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 692 Post(s)
Liked 338 Times in 249 Posts
Lots of info out there about removing BB including the sometimes stubborn fixed cup and the headset cups, IMHO if you are going to the trouble to paint the frame do it right and strip off ALL of the parts as well as treat it for rust before painting. You can decide if it makes sense to get the right tools for the job or just to pay a shop to do it. We are going to need some before and after shots
ryansu is offline  
Old 01-03-20, 11:00 AM
  #14  
Unca_Sam
The dropped
 
Unca_Sam's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2018
Location: Columbus, OH
Posts: 1,374

Bikes: Pake C'Mute Touring/Commuter Build, 1989 Kona Cinder Cone, 1995 Trek 5200

Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1025 Post(s)
Liked 429 Times in 312 Posts
I'm glad you're building her out! This stuff is addicting, and I love the instant satisfaction and accomplishment for doing it right, by myself, and getting a perfect result! Which model is your bike?
Unca_Sam is offline  
Old 01-03-20, 11:01 AM
  #15  
mstateglfr 
Sunshine
 
mstateglfr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: Des Moines, IA
Posts: 10,438

Bikes: '18 class built steel roadbike, '19 Fairlight Secan, '87 Schwinn Prelude, Black Mountain Cycles Monstercross V4, '89 Novara Trionfo, '18 Diamondback Syncr

Mentioned: 94 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4075 Post(s)
Liked 1,049 Times in 672 Posts
Originally Posted by ts99 View Post
Thanks. I've put those in my ebay cart and will likely get one of them (I'm not link-worthy yet, so I deleted the links from my post). I guess I'd feel more feeling of accomplishment if I repacked the old bearings, and I may still do that, but I'm all for a $15 solution that works. I'll pull out the old and look at it.
Totally understand the conflict of keeping whats old/original versus buying and using the simpler product. Luckily there is no right or wrong decision in all this- its a spectrum of choices and we all just find our point on the line where we feel comfortable. Enjoy the tedious process of paint and rust removal!- it can become a bit zen-like with the repetitious back and forth of emery cloth!
mstateglfr is online now  
Old 01-03-20, 11:17 AM
  #16  
mgopack42 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2018
Location: The Baths, CA
Posts: 598

Bikes: 2012 Pinarello FP Quatro, 1994 Specialized Allez, Mid 80's Ciocc, 1985 Masi 3V.

Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 214 Post(s)
Liked 129 Times in 87 Posts
Originally Posted by ts99 View Post
I resurrected my 1977 Trek, that I bought when I was 14, from 40 years in flooded basements. It actually looked pretty good until about 10 years ago but is now extremely rusty. I got it going and rode it this past summer and fall, including in two triathlons. Now I've stripped off almost everything and am going to paint it. A few questions:

Should I remove the bottom bracket? I think I can get it out, but it has no wiggle and feels pretty good, should I just leave it alone?

Likewise the bearing cups on the head tube. Remove them? Looks easy enough to remove if I buy or make the right tool, but will reinstalling them mess things up more than just leaving them?

Any other tips on paint? The original color is ice blue metallic. I want to match it EXACTLY if I can. A guy I met has an auto body shop and from my description thinks he can match it, but I might try it myself. I haven't found any spray can enamel paints that are close to it. I did find a quart of enamel on Amazon that looks like the right one, but I guess that would require finding a paint gun. I know nothing about painting such things. Advice?

btw, I already have the TREK and Reynolds 531 decals to put on it after painting.

Any advice would be appreciated.
I would say that IIRC, all Treks of that era used Dupont Imron paint. My guess is that you should be able to match it exactly using these color chips. Your auto paint friend should be familiar with that particular paint.
Others here, who actually worked in the Trek factory may tell me I am full of bologna!
mgopack42 is offline  
Likes For mgopack42:
Old 01-03-20, 11:19 AM
  #17  
ts99
Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jan 2020
Location: Central Pennsylvania
Posts: 46

Bikes: 1977 Trek

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 32 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 14 Times in 6 Posts
Originally Posted by Unca_Sam View Post
Which model is your bike?
TX700 frame, made in April 1977. Reynolds 531. Campy dropouts. Braze-ons were $20 extra each, so I didn't get many. Dura Ace crank, Dura Ace high-flange hubs with Weinman concave rims. Various other brands involved. Doesn't line up exactly with one of their models at the time, like I said it was kinda a custom deal. Cost about $300.
ts99 is offline  
Old 01-03-20, 11:21 AM
  #18  
ts99
Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jan 2020
Location: Central Pennsylvania
Posts: 46

Bikes: 1977 Trek

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 32 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 14 Times in 6 Posts
ts99 is offline  
Likes For ts99:
Old 01-03-20, 11:26 AM
  #19  
squirtdad
Senior Member
 
squirtdad's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: San Jose (Willow Glen) Ca
Posts: 7,039

Bikes: 85 team Miyata (modern 5800 105) , '84 Team Miyata,(dura ace old school) '82 nishiski,

Mentioned: 70 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1169 Post(s)
Liked 368 Times in 283 Posts
my take based on painting 2 frames:

overall you would be better off getting it powder coated by a places that routinely powder coats bikes....over all cheaper/more durable

if you really have a in with a car painter use that as car paint is much more durable than "rattle can"

If you do it your self....get a good mask first thing like $40

general steps that I used

100% no paint left on frame
wiped with paint prep so there are no oils on frame (handle with glove on after this)

coat of acid etch primer
coat of sandable primer
light sand
wipe with tack rag
2-4 coats color (thin, best to plan to do re-coats in the re-coat time period specified by the paint)
2-3 coats clear
__________________
Looking for more time to ride what I have
squirtdad is offline  
Old 01-03-20, 11:39 AM
  #20  
Unca_Sam
The dropped
 
Unca_Sam's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2018
Location: Columbus, OH
Posts: 1,374

Bikes: Pake C'Mute Touring/Commuter Build, 1989 Kona Cinder Cone, 1995 Trek 5200

Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1025 Post(s)
Liked 429 Times in 312 Posts
I see your bike! You must be tall!
I see lots of rusty areas all over, which will take enough time (in my experience) that you'll question your resolve. Can you afford a media blast and professional repaint? I'd seriously consider it because I don't get consecutive 8 hour days working on the bike, but your situation might be different.
If you go the full removal route, Velocals makes replica decals that should work on your bike. Take pictures of the decals you have before sanding!
Unca_Sam is offline  
Old 01-03-20, 11:44 AM
  #21  
USAZorro
Señor Member
 
USAZorro's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Hardy, VA
Posts: 16,674

Bikes: Mostly English - predominantly Raleighs

Mentioned: 53 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 895 Post(s)
Liked 176 Times in 125 Posts
My son has a friend in Duncannon who powder coats auto parts. I've seen some of his work, and he does a quality job. PM me if you have interest in more info.
__________________
In search of what to search for.
USAZorro is offline  
Old 01-03-20, 11:49 AM
  #22  
Jmpierce
Senior Member
 
Jmpierce's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: The Lou
Posts: 180

Bikes: 82 Trek 710, 90 Trek 750, 86 Vitus, Nishiki Cervino, 2 Nashbars, an Italian Steel MTB, Sears Spaceliner, and a 74 Schwinn Speedster. I also manage a fleet of Volcanic Patrol bikes, 83 of them.

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 56 Post(s)
Liked 95 Times in 47 Posts
Very exciting restore! I strongly recommend powder coating. ITs a lot more durable. I have a 82 Trek 710 that I repainted myself with not great results ( I was a painter in the Navy and it still turned out badly). I had it repainted at that time by a paint shop that did some bicycle frame painting with lacquer. The finish looked fantastic but it chips easily. I've had two other frames powder coated recently and the finish is amazing and very durable. Powdercoaters can do amazing things these days.



My 710 with lacquer finish.




Powdercoated frame
Jmpierce is offline  
Old 01-03-20, 12:01 PM
  #23  
deux jambes 
Senior Member
 
deux jambes's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2018
Location: Eugene, OR
Posts: 1,007
Mentioned: 56 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 477 Post(s)
Liked 274 Times in 155 Posts
Originally Posted by mgopack42 View Post
I would say that IIRC, all Treks of that era used Dupont Imron paint. My guess is that you should be able to match it exactly using these color chips. Your auto paint friend should be familiar with that particular paint.
Others here, who actually worked in the Trek factory may tell me I am full of bologna!
I scrolled through patiently waiting to see if someone would mention DuPont Imron. It’s my understanding that all early Treks were coated in this paint as well. Famous for nice hues, a fine metallic effect that almost appears to “float,” and durability.

I’ve noticed that a lot of American made frames from the era appears to wear Imron paint. I know the ‘84 Trek 510 I once had did. That bike was finished in darker blue shade offered. Nice color, but I REALLY like the “ice blue” that the OP wants to restore his bike to. I wouldn’t settle for anything other than a perfect match either. Hopefully his painter has those color chips!
deux jambes is offline  
Old 01-03-20, 12:10 PM
  #24  
Phil_gretz
Journeyman Bike Commuter
 
Phil_gretz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Alexandria, VA
Posts: 5,826

Bikes: '71 Jeunet 640, '74 Fuji Special Road Racer, '79 Peugeot PXN10LE, '88 Fuji Saratoga, '13 Motobecane Fantom29 HT, '16 Motobecane Turino Pro Disc, '16 Motobecane Gran Premio Elite, '18 Velobuild VB-R-022

Mentioned: 16 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 947 Post(s)
Liked 563 Times in 323 Posts
Originally Posted by ts99 View Post
btw, how do you like your Motobecane Gran Premio? Did you get that from bikesdirect?
Thanks for asking. I don't talk about it very much, but this bike "punches significantly heavier than its weight class" in terms of how good it feels in cornering and climbing. Admittedly, I've changed out both the calipers (Tektro to BR-5800) and the crankset (FSA Gossamer to FC-5800) which significantly upped the stiffness of each of those components and improved front upshifting. It comes in at 21 lbs, which is fine for a daily rider. Bottom line...I like it fine. But even for a $900 base bike, it's a good value.
Phil_gretz is offline  
Old 01-03-20, 01:33 PM
  #25  
ts99
Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jan 2020
Location: Central Pennsylvania
Posts: 46

Bikes: 1977 Trek

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 32 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 14 Times in 6 Posts
Originally Posted by deux jambes View Post
I scrolled through patiently waiting to see if someone would mention DuPont Imron. It’s my understanding that all early Treks were coated in this paint as well. Famous for nice hues, a fine metallic effect that almost appears to “float,” and durability.
Yep. Below from the 1977 brochure. It was durable until it spend years in a flooded basement.


ts99 is offline  
Likes For ts99:

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information

Copyright © 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.