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Completely conflicted

Old 05-23-20, 11:39 AM
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hybridbkrdr
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Question Completely conflicted

This may be a useless post but wondering if anyone has any input. I already have several bicycles but not completely satisfied because of the stupid pot holes in this city (no joke).

I'm trying to decide between the following:

Norco Indie 2 27.5x2" tires, 46/30 crankset, Shimano SL-M315 shifters

Brodie Tesla 27.5x2.2" tires, 46/30 crankset, Shimano SL-M315 shifters

Breezer Midtown 1.5 27.5x2.4" tires, 48/38/28 crankset, Shimano Altus shifters (likely same as above)

They all look pretty sweet but the Midtown Breezer 1.5 has a 470mm chainstay and 48/38/28 crankset which means I'd have to deal with a triple front derailleur. One plus for the Norco Indie 2 is Planet Bike sells a 27.5 fender which takes 1.9" tires which means they'll likely accommodate 2" tires. For the Breezer Midtown 1.5, there are SKS Bluemels 75U fenders although those look a bit wide. For the Brodie Tesla, I'm not sure which fender might be more compatible.

By the way, I know I made a poll for 3" tires. But I saw a Del Sol electric bike with 2.5" tires and they looked adequate to me. Although I still don't understand why they don't make direct-mount brakes for larger tires.
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Old 05-23-20, 12:19 PM
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Originally Posted by hybridbkrdr View Post
They all look pretty sweet but the Midtown Breezer 1.5 has a 470mm chainstay and 48/38/28 crankset which means I'd have to deal with a triple front derailleur.
Triples can work very well. Most of my bikes have a triple crank, and I've never had issues with being able to get them adjusted. I prefer the wider range they offer. If I was going to move away from a 3x crank, I'd go straight to a 1x. A double doesn't offer me any benefit over a triple. I do have one 1x bike -- an old Peugeot that I made into a 1x from a road double.

Originally Posted by hybridbkrdr View Post
Although I still don't understand why they don't make direct-mount brakes for larger tires.
I think the short answer is there's no market for it. The tested and proven linear pull brake (often called "V brake") works well, is inexpensive, and uses long-pull brake levers, just like mechanical discs. I suspect (though don't know for sure) direct-mount brakes might use short-pull brake levers, which are not common for flat bar bikes anymore, and it'd be another part combination the factory would have to stock.
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Old 05-23-20, 04:28 PM
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Originally Posted by hybridbkrdr View Post
This may be a useless post but wondering if anyone has any input. I already have several bicycles but not completely satisfied because of the stupid pot holes in this city (no joke).

I'm trying to decide between the following:

Norco Indie 2 27.5x2" tires, 46/30 crankset, Shimano SL-M315 shifters

Brodie Tesla 27.5x2.2" tires, 46/30 crankset, Shimano SL-M315 shifters

Breezer Midtown 1.5 27.5x2.4" tires, 48/38/28 crankset, Shimano Altus shifters (likely same as above)

They all look pretty sweet but the Midtown Breezer 1.5 has a 470mm chainstay and 48/38/28 crankset which means I'd have to deal with a triple front derailleur. One plus for the Norco Indie 2 is Planet Bike sells a 27.5 fender which takes 1.9" tires which means they'll likely accommodate 2" tires. For the Breezer Midtown 1.5, there are SKS Bluemels 75U fenders although those look a bit wide. For the Brodie Tesla, I'm not sure which fender might be more compatible.
Brodie, because I always wanted one and I already have a Breezer and a Norco. Plus, its blue and has a steel fork, which should eat more road vibrations than Al. The frame has the classic 90s Canadian MTB profile - dropped and sloping top tube, extended seat tube, and forward facing clamp cutout.

Joe Breeze does make nice bikes that ride great though, aside from cliche reviews this is one brand that has a reputation for nice riding bikes and optimizing frames.

There is nothing wrong with triples and 3x8 is proven, but 30x46 is a more modern setup that I frankly really like. I don't know if 8 in the back is enough for that double to shine though. For road buzz, I find Ti or crabon bars to help considerably

Originally Posted by hybridbkrdr View Post
Although I still don't understand why they don't make direct-mount brakes for larger tires.
Vees do a better job without the drawbacks.
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Old 05-24-20, 08:38 AM
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"not completely satisfied because of the stupid pot holes in this city.
-------------------

I don't see suspension forks on any of those bikes. You're situation is exactly what they are made for. My ride also consists of some bad roads and mup's. My next bike, Likely this Giant Roam 2 Disc has 42mm tires and suspension forks.


https://www.giant-bicycles.com/ca/roam-2-disc

If Giant bikes aren't available, I'd get something similar from another reputable manufacturer.
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Old 05-24-20, 05:02 PM
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Originally Posted by xroadcharlie View Post
"not completely satisfied because of the stupid pot holes in this city.
-------------------

I don't see suspension forks on any of those bikes. You're situation is exactly what they are made for. My ride also consists of some bad roads and mup's. My next bike, Likely this Giant Roam 2 Disc has 42mm tires and suspension forks.


https://www.giant-bicycles.com/ca/roam-2-disc

If Giant bikes aren't available, I'd get something similar from another reputable manufacturer.
Do you want to know the peculiar reason some bikes were taken off my list? Look at the way the fork is made on the Giant Escape. If I can't install an Atran Granny front rack on it, I may forget about it. There needs to be a hole somewhere close to the axle of the front wheel.
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Old 05-25-20, 10:41 AM
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I bought a 2019 Norco Indie3 from a pawn shop cheap. It was listed as "used" but other than puddle splashes it was like new.
I wasn't thrilled about the colour (slate blue) but it has really grown on me.

The Indie3 has a steel fork so will probably take bumps a little different than the Indie2. However, if you adjust with the tire pressure on the 700c45c tires you can dial in a nice compromise between comfort and speed.

It looks like the 2020 models have a different frame confg(?) and the 3 is gone from the line up.
I'm not familiar with the other bikes in your list but I'm very happy with the Norco...
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Old 05-25-20, 06:45 PM
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Originally Posted by hybridbkrdr View Post
Do you want to know the peculiar reason some bikes were taken off my list? Look at the way the fork is made on the Giant Escape. If I can't install an Atran Granny front rack on it, I may forget about it. There needs to be a hole somewhere close to the axle of the front wheel.
The suspension forks on Giant's Roam 2 (see link in my previous post) are compatible with front and rear racks. Just thought you should know.
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Old 05-26-20, 04:11 PM
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I just calculated something on a gear calculator. If I choose either the Norco Indie 2 or Brodie Tesla and I want to save my energy for my workouts, I could use only the 4 easiest gears (on the cassette) while on the smallest chainring (30T on the crankset). Then, if I want to gradually go faster, I can switch to the large chainring (46T) on the cranket once I'm in the 4rth gear (like go from 40 gear inches to 60 gear inches once you switch to the large chainring at the front). (This is to avoid cross-chaining of course. It also makes it look like a triple crankset is useless anyway...)
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Old 05-26-20, 06:20 PM
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Originally Posted by hybridbkrdr View Post
I could use only the 4 easiest gears (on the cassette) while on the smallest chainring (30T on the crankset). Then, if I want to gradually go faster, I can switch to the large chainring (46T) on the cranket once I'm in the 4rth gear (like go from 40 gear inches to 60 gear inches once you switch to the large chainring at the front).
Yes, you could do this. The 30-46 transition will be a fairly abrupt change to your cadence, and you may find that you need another gear or two on the cassette to make the change smooth (or just power through the big ratio change).

Alternatively, a 36-tooth ring on a triple will take you all the way from about 30 gear inches to 90 gear inches, with no changes on the front required. At a cadence of 60-80 rpm, that's a road speed range of about 5 mph to 20 mph. That's going to cover most of what you'll likely be riding as a hybrid rider. Again, without any shifting on the front required.
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Old 05-28-20, 05:09 PM
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Even though I'm almost desperate to try one of those 650b bikes, I think I might buy a Specialized Sirrus 1.0 and install a 46/30 crankset (with chainrguard) and SL-M315 shifters on it. That's partly because I already have a 700c wheelset I haven't built up yet and I still like V-brakes. Also, I suspect the Specialized Sirrus 1.0 may be one of the only bikes that can take the Atran Granny front rack.

Actually, when it comes to shifting, most of the time in the winter I would be on a 30T chainring anyway (because of snow resistance). Then if I do a shift from 40 to 60 gear inches, I could always shift back one gear to be at 53 gear inches (hypothetical situation on a Norco Indie 2 once I'm on the 46T chainring).
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Old 06-06-20, 03:59 PM
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I just realized I could buy one of those bike and simply have the frame converted to accept V-brakes or even use large caliper brakes. I don't know which of the Tektro models it would take but might be either the Tektro R559 (53-73mm), Tektro 810C (61-81mm) or Tektro 900A (72-92mm).
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Old 06-06-20, 04:47 PM
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Originally Posted by hybridbkrdr View Post
I just realized I could buy one of those bike and simply have the frame converted to accept V-brakes or even use large caliper brakes.
How? Why?
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Old 06-07-20, 05:54 PM
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Originally Posted by DorkDisk View Post
How? Why?
lol, I know the answer is not obvious. People recommend hydraulic disc brakes, however I read they can freeze at -15C (5F). And mechanical disc brakes apparently aren't as good as V-brakes anyway. Since I want to go down from 4 bikes to 2, I would likely use that bike in the winter as well. I wouldn't use my touring bike in the winter though.
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Old 06-08-20, 05:43 AM
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Originally Posted by hybridbkrdr View Post
lol, I know the answer is not obvious. People recommend hydraulic disc brakes, however I read they can freeze at -15C (5F). And mechanical disc brakes apparently aren't as good as V-brakes anyway. Since I want to go down from 4 bikes to 2, I would likely use that bike in the winter as well. I wouldn't use my touring bike in the winter though.
In terms of braking power in dry weather, they are about on par; but discs are more consistent in all conditions, regardless of actuation method.

At least you can mount a cable disc system on those bikes. How do you want to mount V brakes? Do the wheels even have brake tracks?
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Old 06-08-20, 06:27 AM
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Originally Posted by hybridbkrdr View Post
I just realized I could buy one of those bike and simply have the frame converted to accept V-brakes or even use large caliper brakes. I don't know which of the Tektro models it would take but might be either the Tektro R559 (53-73mm), Tektro 810C (61-81mm) or Tektro 900A (72-92mm).
These are caliper brakes. You likely won't get any of these to fit around a 2.3"+ tire. The larger the brake reach (and opening), the worse your mechanical advantage. I don't think you'll get very good performance out this setup.
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Old 06-09-20, 08:13 AM
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Originally Posted by DorkDisk View Post
In terms of braking power in dry weather, they are about on par; but discs are more consistent in all conditions, regardless of actuation method.

At least you can mount a cable disc system on those bikes. How do you want to mount V brakes? Do the wheels even have brake tracks?
As far as the wheels are concerned, yes it's true they may not have brake tracks. But for the mechanical disc brakes, I've read some people ride with tools in their pockets so they can adjust on the road because that's how often you have to adjust some mechanical disc brakes.

I may have found a partial solution, the Giant ATX 3 (V-brake version). Sure, it's a Tourney bike but I mean it has the mounting holes for backrack and fenders. And I just have to get one of those front racks that connects on the front hub to get 4 bags on the bike. I'm sure there's space for fenders with the 2.1" tires on there but not sure if it will take Kenda Kwick Seven.5 2.2" tires AND fenders at the same time (maybe because the Seven.5 are slick tires). It's a 27.5" bike so the circumference should work better for pot holes anyway (than 26" wheels).

The practical problem is real though. I went grocery shopping yesterday with 4 bags on my bike and even food in my backpack. What was it like? I had to slow down to a snail's pace in some places. I mean some parts of this city looked like it was bombed in the second World War and never recovered. It's not just pot holes, it's places where the asphalt is very undulated marked with pot holes and even rocks about. It's an absolute travesty. lol There's an area that's supposed to be replaced by a new bridge but because of FREAKIN' CORONA it hasn't happened yet.

By the way, I did find some other models with 27.5" wheels and V-brakes: GT Palomar, Diadora Novara & Orbita (at Sports Experts), CCM FS Sector (although that one is only a buy at $300 Canadian at Canadian Tire).

Of course if I did buy a Giant ATX 3 V-brake version, I'd probably want to modify it. I'd replace the shifter/brake levers with separate brake levers and Rapidfire shifters, put on an Allen key type seatpost clamp, change the crankset to 46/30T crankset etc. I'd prefer rigid forks but understand the rigid fork version of this bike (although a disc version) was discontinued. I'd admit though this is a bike I could run stock for a while until I want to spend money on it.
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Old 06-09-20, 11:21 AM
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Originally Posted by hybridbkrdr View Post
I've read some people ride with tools in their pockets so they can adjust on the road because that's how often you have to adjust some mechanical disc brakes.
If you want rim brakes instead of disc brakes, that's totally okay, and I wouldn't try to dissuade you from that, but I think carrying tools to adjust mechanical disc brakes during a ride is a bit of hyperbole. I own a few bikes with disc brakes, both hydraulic and mechanical, and they don't come out of adjustment like that. Hydraulic brakes are self-adjusting/self-centering, so there are no worries there. And mechanical disc brakes, while not self-adjusting, don't need constant attention like that. They would need continual adjustment only if the pads wore that quickly (they don't) or if the caliper is loose or somehow defective such that it keeps walking around during operation (which is not common). In fact, some mechanical disc brakes (like Avid's BB7) have tool-less adjustment, so you don't need tools, even if you do need to adjust them.

There are definitely pros and cons to both types of brakes, but continual adjustment like you describe is not an attribute of even mechanical disc brakes, at least in my experience.
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Old 06-09-20, 12:26 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hybridbkrdr View Post
I've read some people ride with tools in their pockets so they can adjust on the road because that's how often you have to adjust some mechanical disc brakes.


Re mechanical discs....I was wondering the same (when I was shopping) but now that I've put on some miles on my Indie I have only had to make an adjustment (once) after removing the front wheel for transport. All that was required was re-loosing the front wheel and re-seating it so the rotor was true between the pads.
That said......I do carry tools in my backpack just in case.
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Old 06-10-20, 09:14 AM
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Originally Posted by Speedway2 View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by hybridbkrdr View Post
I've read some people ride with tools in their pockets so they can adjust on the road because that's how often you have to adjust some mechanical disc brakes.


Re mechanical discs....I was wondering the same (when I was shopping) but now that I've put on some miles on my Indie I have only had to make an adjustment (once) after removing the front wheel for transport. All that was required was re-loosing the front wheel and re-seating it so the rotor was true between the pads.
That said......I do carry tools in my backpack just in case.
How do you find the position on the Indie? Did you have to adjust the bars upward? (I can't tell in the pictures but it looks like the bars sweep back.)

Anyway, this thread is a bit weird in the sense that I went from considering hybrids to mountain bikes and now to cruisers. Because of a bit of chondromalacia in my knees, the laid back style of a cruiser might annoy my knees. But, I think if I buy a seatpost with a pronounced setback and install it back to front then push the saddle forward as far as I can, that might do. Then I could change to 30mm riser bars on the Specialized Roll and be done with it. The Specialized Roll has 27.5x2.3" tires, rigid forks and V-brakes. The kind of bike that I could probably tour with without having problems with complicated disc brakes nor suspension forks. All I'd need are front and back racks and fenders. Plus I could change the crankset to a 46/30T and add a front derailleur and front 2x shifter. And install a 142mm saddle. One person on Youtube measured the tire on a Roll and it was nearly 62mm. I mean if I had any questions that V-brakes could work with 2.4" tires, then I have my answer.

There are also others in the same category such as the Jamis Hudson & Explorera 2 and Marin Stinson. Actually, in the Cyclingabout channel on Youtube, one person said V-brakes are simpler to maintain on the road.
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Old 06-10-20, 10:42 AM
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The Roll is probably your best bet for a good Out Of The Box experience. The only potential issue is the laid-back seat post, which will put your feet further forward on the crank compared with many other choices, but you've already acknowledged potential ways to address that. V-brakes will definitely work with wide tires like this, and will be a much better choice than caliper brakes if you prefer rim brakes. It looks like the Rolls with rim brakes come with a 1x crank, but with frame cut-outs for the internal cabling. You may have some fiddling to do to get the cabling in place for a front derailleur, but it's definitely possible.

As a disappointing aside, it looks like Specialized really simplified their Roll portfolio as of late, and have taken out the nicer models. It appears the best model you can buy is a $635 Roll Sport with mechanical disc brakes and a 3x7 drivetrain. The main page for the Roll shows some of the nicer ones apparently on clearance...presumably because they've been discontinued.
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Old 06-10-20, 04:25 PM
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Originally Posted by hybridbkrdr View Post
How do you find the position on the Indie? Did you have to adjust the bars upward? (I can't tell in the pictures but it looks like the bars sweep back.)
The "sweep back" on the bars is minimal. Just enough so your wrists have a natural and comfortable break. Probably the norm of most bars.
The only "mod" I did to the handlebars was trimming off about 1" from each end. I also played with the height of the bars by adding/removing the stem rings.
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