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100+ temperatures

Old 07-04-20, 12:10 PM
  #26  
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An aborted self-supported century ride is one of the reasons that I'm spending my retirement years in North Idaho. A few years before I retired, I planned out a nice century ride from my home in Palmdale, (the high desert north of Los Angeles), to a distant mountain town, Tehachapi. Perpendicular to the wind, so that wouldn't be a problem. Flat across the Antelope Valley, then a moderate, but relentless climb to Tehachapi. Stop for lunch in town, then down the hill and across the valley home. Easy. Or so I thought.

Started out in the morning, made good time across the valley and my first stop outside Rosamond, about 22 miles into the ride. It was a nice, sunny day. But I don't remember it being particularly warm or hot. The little corner market had closed so I rested in the shadow of the nearby wine tasting room. I noticed pretty quickly that beads of sweat broke out all over my arms. "Oh, wow!", I thought. A real world example to use in my "Weather and Climate" class that I taught at the local community college. About how wind evaporates water and as long as I was moving, I was creating my own wind which evaporated the sweat off my arms. "Cool."

I noticed my water was awfully warm too. Almost like drinking watered-down tea. There is nothing more refreshing than ice cold water and noting more disgusting that warm/hot water. Anyway, after eating my little snack, I headed off. After a few more flatish miles, I started climbing through the windmill farm. Not a particularly steep climb, just continuous. As I continued to climb, I started feeling terrible. More and more as I continued climbing.

"Uh oh!", I thought. "Something's not right." "I better turn around and head home, I'm feeling pretty bad." I ended up taking a slightly different route home, one with a lot more little convenience stores along the way. The water in my insulated bottles was so hot that I couldn't drink it. I stopped at every store on the way and purchased something cold to drink. The colder the better.

Along the way, a mail delivery truck came from the opposite direction. The mail lady slowed as she came up to me and asked if I wanted something to drink. I must have looked awful, to have her coming toward me and stopping to offer cold water. She said she carries a cooler of water with her when making her rounds.

Finally limped home and checked the thermometer. It read 104ļ F. With the low desert humidity, it didn't feel all that hot. But I guess under the cloudless summer sky and pushing a bicycle, it was too much. I spent the rest of the day recovering and re-hydrating. It was also the day I decided that "No more!" I'm going to retire somewhere it doesn't get so hot.

Nixed southern Idaho because it gets triple digits in the summer. Not so up north. I get a kick when people start complaining about how hot it is; and it is only in the high 80s. If they only knew. I do not ride in triple digits anymore. I'm sure that on that day, I was suffering from some form of heat stroke or heat exhaustion. Could have put myself in a coma. I was lucky that day. (And foolish me. I didn't check the weather forecast that day.)

Last edited by volosong; 07-04-20 at 12:14 PM.
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Old 07-04-20, 02:53 PM
  #27  
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The first sign of serious trouble in the heat is that those nice little beads of sweat on your forearms aren't there anymore. Dry forearms and you need to be somewhere shady where there's water inside an hour or you'll probably have a Health Event. Another thing which starts a little earlier is rising HR at the same effort. Now that I use sun sleeves all the time, I go by my HRM. I've always worn an HRM, so I'm quite familiar with what normal looks like.

I'll drink water no matter its temperature. Even quite warm water will cool one effectively as sweat. Water stays much cooler in a Camelbak, especially a Camelbak that was first filled with ice. Camelbak makes special ice trays which make long ice cylinders which melt more slowly. Even with the Camelbak, I'll have a liter bottle on the bike.

On long rides, whatever the temperature, I'll take enough Endurolytes to make me thirsty enough to drink enough so that I'll need to pee about every 3 hours. That of course has the effect of keeping my electrolytes always in balance. If that much time goes by without peeing, I'll find somewhere to sit and drink water until I pee, then go on. Even on an event ride, losing time this way is much better than a DNF.

I never drink water without thirst. IOW, I drink to thirst. That prevents hyponatremia, which is at least as great a medical risk as dehydration. Only experience can tell one how much electrolyte one needs to create thirst. One doesn't always get thirsty when dehydrated. Thirst depends more on electrolyte balance than it does of dehydration level, which can be independent of that balance. One also will have a much better electrolyte balance on long rides if one always eats a low salt diet, which sounds backwards but is nevertheless how it works.

I didn't figure this out on my own. Hammer Nutrition has a free PDF handbook which explains all of this. I read it when I was first starting to ride long distances, long ago. It works. You don't have to use Endurolytes, their brand, anything with about that composition and strength works fine. I never put electrolytes in my water, because one doesn't always need the same balance of electrolyte to water consumed, though another good way to go is to have one bottle of strong electrolyte concentration and another source of plain water, and to alternate them according to one's need to create thirst.

This was so much typing that I'm going to bookmark it for future reference.
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Old 07-04-20, 02:59 PM
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Originally Posted by Gundo View Post
I used to like the heat but since I've been on Beta Blockers the heat kicks my butt. I find I'm worn out at the end of my rides and not from the mileage.
I hear ya. Beta blockers suck. Not getting enough blood to your muscles sucks. But I'm alive 🙂

I have been on them for years. I seem to have worked past them though - built up immunity? My blood pressure is low enough now I skip them on some ride days (not suggesting anybody should).

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Old 07-04-20, 09:22 PM
  #29  
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I got the heat problem solved. No more sun or nasty sunblock..



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Old 07-04-20, 09:29 PM
  #30  
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Originally Posted by Hondo Gravel View Post
I got the heat problem solved. No more sun or nasty sunblock..



Be safe. Happy 4th,!
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Old 07-04-20, 10:36 PM
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Originally Posted by Carbonfiberboy View Post


I never drink water without thirst. IOW, I drink to thirst. That prevents hyponatremia, which is at least as great a medical risk as dehydration. Only experience can tell one how much electrolyte one needs to create thirst. One doesn't always get thirsty when dehydrated. Thirst depends more on electrolyte balance than it does of dehydration level, which can be independent of that balance. One also will have a much better electrolyte balance on long rides if one always eats a low salt diet, which sounds backwards but is nevertheless how it works.
.
I agree with most of your post with a couple of exceptions. First, I think hyponatremia is extremely rare with cyclists. I've heard of it, once with a friend who was part way through RAAM and had to be hospitalized and another time with a guy who was doing a 150 mile climbing ride on a hot day and he wasn't eating. I think if a cyclist is eating or at least taking electrolytes the risk is minimal. I know people have died from it during marathons, but these are people who spend 6+ hours running with nothing but water.
The other thing is the "drink only when thirsty" idea. This may work for some but certainly not everyone every time. When I do a hot climbing ride I cannot keep up with the fluid loss and have to start forcing water early in the ride. I typically come home from a hot ride (6 hours, more or less) 5 or 6 pounds lighter. I tried to ration water once, still drank a bunch, and was 11 pounds lighter after the ride. To me, thirst doesn't enter it and I must make a conscious effort to drink.
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Old 07-04-20, 11:25 PM
  #32  
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Originally Posted by Hondo Gravel View Post
I got the heat problem solved. No more sun or nasty sunblock..



My fastest 200k ever was a 11pm departure out of San Angelo, TX. July 14, 2017. 07:30 elapsed time, solo. I'll tell you what, I did that ride several times at night, and it's darned spooky out there in the middle of frickin' nowhere, with not a single car from midnight to 5am.

IIRC, it was still over 100F when I departed. But it's a dry heat, they say ROFLMAO. Dry heat sucks the water out of your body faster than you can drink. At least at 11pm-6am the sun isn't killing you.

It's a left out of the parking lot, then a right onto the highway, straight down to Sonora with nothing in-between except a closed down Eldorado, fuel and water at the Sonora convenience store, back north on the highway, left, right. Six turns, 201km. Nothing to keep you company but the wind, which guaranteed will be blowing one way or the other.

Cheers, from cool and green Oregon
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Old 07-05-20, 12:07 AM
  #33  
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Originally Posted by downtube42 View Post
My fastest 200k ever was a 11pm departure out of San Angelo, TX. July 14, 2017. 07:30 elapsed time, solo. I'll tell you what, I did that ride several times at night, and it's darned spooky out there in the middle of frickin' nowhere, with not a single car from midnight to 5am.

IIRC, it was still over 100F when I departed. But it's a dry heat, they say ROFLMAO. Dry heat sucks the water out of your body faster than you can drink. At least at 11pm-6am the sun isn't killing you.

It's a left out of the parking lot, then a right onto the highway, straight down to Sonora with nothing in-between except a closed down Eldorado, fuel and water at the Sonora convenience store, back north on the highway, left, right. Six turns, 201km. Nothing to keep you company but the wind, which guaranteed will be blowing one way or the other.

Cheers, from cool and green Oregon
Yes, just a few hours ago I almost collided with a deer. I was on routes where I know the roads very well so I know where the deer tend to be. Not nearly as lonely as the route you cruised at night. Skunks and rattlesnakes is my biggest fear. It was great to get out of the hot sun and the old boring route is like new at night it feels like a completely different route. I havenít cycled at night very much so this is new and keeping the sport fresh.
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Old 07-05-20, 03:29 AM
  #34  
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I agree with what others say, it's the humidity as much as the heat that makes it so tough to exercise when it gets hot. Admittedly here in the(usually) cool UK high temps are rare. Last week did a ride in around 85F which for where I live is hot but it was the humidity which was tougher. Somewhere like Aus where it's dry heat not so bad imo. For what it's worth I love the hot weather, time to move if I can persuade the family!
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Old 07-05-20, 04:22 AM
  #35  
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To be sure I always have cool or cold water I carry at least two insulated bottles. One is semi-frosty from sitting overnight on the top shelf of the fridge under the cold air vent from freezer. It'll have some frost but not frozen solid. It'll stay cool for the 60-90 minutes it takes me to drink it.

The second bottle is frozen solid overnight. By the time I've finished the first bottle the second is thawing and will stay cold for a couple of hours. Depending on my route I'll stop at a convenience store to refill with a bottle of generic sports drink poured into the remaining chunk of ice in the second bottle.

If I'm not sure about supplies on a route I'll take a third bottle or Mylar pouch, also frozen, in a jersey pocket.

I also have a double insulated stainless thermos that fits my water bottle cages. Sometimes I'll fill it about 1/2 to 2/3 full, freeze it, and top off with plain water. It'll stay icy 12-24 hours depending on ambient temperature. Or I'll fill it with hot coffee for winter rides. It's heavy but worth lugging for really hot or cold rides.
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Old 07-05-20, 09:42 AM
  #36  
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Originally Posted by Hondo Gravel View Post
Yes, just a few hours ago I almost collided with a deer. I was on routes where I know the roads very well so I know where the deer tend to be. Not nearly as lonely as the route you cruised at night. Skunks and rattlesnakes is my biggest fear. It was great to get out of the hot sun and the old boring route is like new at night it feels like a completely different route. I havenít cycled at night very much so this is new and keeping the sport fresh.
I still wonder if a deer was the cause of my skull be cracked in three places last year. I have amnesia for everything that happened 10 or 15 minutes prior till I got put in my room at the hospital. One of the fleeting little scenes that went through my head for a period of time after were of a deer bounding off through the woods.

If you ride solo, think about whether you might want another to know when to expect you back or even share your location with them via your smartphone. My wife had just checked my location on her phone, saw I was stopped in an area I don't normally stop in and was about to call 911 when the people that found me called her. So simple things of just letting another person know and location sharing with a smartphone can work.

Anyhow.... back to the subject. Your gravel roads out there look great. Wish the few we had here were like that. Here, they tend to be six inches deep in wash gravel.
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Old 07-05-20, 09:55 AM
  #37  
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The gravel here is hard packed so it is fairly smooth. But I have to watch those soft spots that the tires like to dig into. I have a sibling that lives nearby that can track me on her I-phone. I should tell her when I’m out biking at night. People out here are friendly if I’m found wrecked and in tatters I think they would help ...
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Old 07-05-20, 11:49 AM
  #38  
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Originally Posted by big john View Post
I agree with most of your post with a couple of exceptions. First, I think hyponatremia is extremely rare with cyclists. I've heard of it, once with a friend who was part way through RAAM and had to be hospitalized and another time with a guy who was doing a 150 mile climbing ride on a hot day and he wasn't eating. I think if a cyclist is eating or at least taking electrolytes the risk is minimal. I know people have died from it during marathons, but these are people who spend 6+ hours running with nothing but water.
The other thing is the "drink only when thirsty" idea. This may work for some but certainly not everyone every time. When I do a hot climbing ride I cannot keep up with the fluid loss and have to start forcing water early in the ride. I typically come home from a hot ride (6 hours, more or less) 5 or 6 pounds lighter. I tried to ration water once, still drank a bunch, and was 11 pounds lighter after the ride. To me, thirst doesn't enter it and I must make a conscious effort to drink.
My wife got hyponatremia on one of our 10-day backpacks. The weather was cool and showery. We hiked maybe 6 hours. After we made camp, she was obviously not OK, pale, nauseous, confused. It was a bit terrifying. We talked and I finally figured it out: she'd been drinking to the timing pattern she used on long bike rides, except that it was cool and she wasn't sweating. I'd only drunk about 1 pt. all day and felt fine. I gave her 2 Endurolytes with a little water and she was fine in 1/2 hour. Drink to thirst.

If you're not thirsty and are hammering water, you are definitely at risk. No matter how much water you're drinking, and about a liter per hour is all that's possible, you need to take enough electrolytes that you're slightly thirsty because that indicates proper balance and should produce slightly better performance and recovery. Definitely don't ration water. Why would one do that? We should all know that water does more good in the body than it does in the bottle. If you're low on water and worried, drink it.

I have a little heat exhaustion story which might be helpful to someone. My wife and I were on our honeymoon hike, long ago, in the Olympic National Park. It was sunny, amazing. About 5 miles up the trail, we came upon a fellow with all the symptoms of a divorced lawyer and heat exhaustion. He had his ~12 y.o. kid for the weekend. They had ~$1000 worth of new REI gear. He was wearing a down parka, pale and sweating. We were in shorts and T-shirts. He was not OK. Actually the first person we met was his son, who told us about his dad, up the trail. He'd been sent back down the trail to look for water. We asked the dad if he had water and yes he did but he was afraid to drink it because that was all they had. We gave him some electrolytes, talked him into drinking the water, gave him some more, and walked up the trail with them for an hour. He was fine, so we dropped them and took off. The trail we were on had stream crossings every mile or so, typical of the Olympics. Back in the day, I never carried water in the Park, just a handy cup.

Feeling cold and yet sweaty on a warm day is not what one expects from heat exhaustion, but there it is. Untreated heat exhaustion becomes heat stroke, which becomes a medical emergency.
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Old 07-05-20, 12:25 PM
  #39  
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Originally Posted by Carbonfiberboy View Post
My wife got hyponatremia on one of our 10-day backpacks. The weather was cool and showery. We hiked maybe 6 hours. After we made camp, she was obviously not OK, pale, nauseous, confused. It was a bit terrifying. We talked and I finally figured it out: she'd been drinking to the timing pattern she used on long bike rides, except that it was cool and she wasn't sweating. I'd only drunk about 1 pt. all day and felt fine. I gave her 2 Endurolytes with a little water and she was fine in 1/2 hour. Drink to thirst..
That is why I specified eating or taking electrolytes. Of course if you flush yourself out you are at risk but the things I have read say if you eat or take electrolytes you should be fine. I never take that risk.
The day I was rationing water was an 85 mile loop with over 8500 feet of climbing, front loaded. I started with 2 large bottles but didn't want to stop and refill and lose the group, I know, dumb.Once into the mountains there was no water until the designated fill stop and by that time I was screwed. No way to catch up with hydration for me and so I suffered and struggled the rest of the day. I drink more than most, a lot more than many people I ride with. Yesterday I rode less than 4 hours, maybe 90 degrees tops, and lots of climbing. I drank about a gallon and when I got home I just kept drinking to try and re-hydrate. Still thirsty this morning.
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Old 07-05-20, 12:26 PM
  #40  
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And we always worry about dehydration. Too much water never really crosses the mind that much. Hiking in the desert mountains in Big Bend NP I ran across one water bottle only guy with no backpack or anything. He was trying to get liquid out of cactus and had thorns sticking in his lips and mouth. Idiot! I was heading down the mountain at least 2 plus hours to go. I gave this fellow a bottle of Gatorade that I could spare I told him hike back to the trailhead now! Oh hell no he insisted on making it to the peak which was miles away I told him you are not going to make it. Save the bottle and ask for liquid but if they refuse you it’s because they are at minimum. I’m not his dad so I left heading back down. If he was a teen or a kid I would have been more insistent., Back home I looked at the NP reports they didn’t pull a corpse off the mountain so I guess he didn’t die.
I never thought much about hyponatremia because I’m always in a sweat but in a cool weather area or when we have cold days in winter it is something to seriously consider.
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Old 07-05-20, 12:42 PM
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I was descending a fire road on my mountain bike and there was a couple on bikes climbing and they were arguing about something. I noticed they only had 1 bottle between them. I got to the bottom and climbing back up I found the guy lying on his back in the middle of the road. I had lots of water (it was hot) and I gave him some and he got up and seemed to be ok so I took off and eventually caught up to his wife/girlfriend, she had their water, and I told her that the guy was hurting back there. She said something like, "He'll be ok". Great, see ya.
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Old 07-05-20, 12:49 PM
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My fellow club member David became the first rider over 60 to finish the RAAM. He failed on his first attempt due to hyponatremia. He gained about 15 pounds of water weight and he's a little guy. He couldn't put his shoes on because his feet and legs were so swollen.
The next year he had figured out the nutrition and hydration and finished with some time to spare. The next time he did it he became the first rider over 65 to finish and he said it was relatively easy.
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Old 07-05-20, 01:10 PM
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Originally Posted by Hondo Gravel View Post
I got the heat problem solved. No more sun or nasty sunblock..



Just an aside: Do you run into some large feral hogs at night?
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Old 07-05-20, 01:10 PM
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I almost never drink straight water for a ride. I've always got a mix in my bottles that includes a little bit of electrolytes. However for those that do drink straight water, they probably should start thinking about a source of electrolytes when going from their third bottle to forth bottle of straight water. Because after the fifth bottle of straight water they can be in dangerous territory if those five bottles are consumed over a relatively short period of time.

The electrolytes don't have to be in your bottles. You can just eat something or take a tablet. Plain table salt is an electrolyte. Sodium, calcium, potassium, chlorides, phosphates and magnesium are all electrolytes. Some more than others. But even a salty snack along the way will help. I just prefer to put it in my bottles like I do my carbs. It's just too bothersome for me to pull out a gel or pill while riding. Not that I can't do it, just that I don't care to since bottles are more convenient.

However more is not better. So be careful not to get into the idea of just simply adding huge amounts of electrolytes into your hydration/feeding regimen while riding. I don't use Gatorade, PowerAid or other pre-made sport drinks because I feel they have too much electrolyte. At least for me they do.
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Old 07-05-20, 01:21 PM
  #45  
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Originally Posted by CAT7RDR View Post
Just an aside: Do you run into some large feral hogs at night?
No but Iím sure I will. I know where the tanks aka ponds are were the pigs like to be that are near the road. They usually run away from you but if all confused could run into you and with those tusks it could turn out bad. Nasty crop destroying pests but if you shoot the 80-100 pounders they make great bar b q.. The big fat 300-500 pounders just stink. No natural enemies even coyotes wonít mess with a 500 pound angry mama sow.
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Old 07-05-20, 01:29 PM
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Originally Posted by Iride01 View Post
I almost never drink straight water for a ride. I've always got a mix in my bottles that includes a little bit of electrolytes. However for those that do drink straight water, they probably should start thinking about a source of electrolytes when going from their third bottle to forth bottle of straight water. Because after the fifth bottle of straight water they can be in dangerous territory if those five bottles are consumed over a relatively short period of time.

The electrolytes don't have to be in your bottles. You can just eat something or take a tablet. Plain table salt is an electrolyte. Sodium, calcium, potassium, chlorides, phosphates and magnesium are all electrolytes. Some more than others. But even a salty snack along the way will help. I just prefer to put it in my bottles like I do my carbs. It's just too bothersome for me to pull out a gel or pill while riding. Not that I can't do it, just that I don't care to since bottles are more convenient.

However more is not better. So be careful not to get into the idea of just simply adding huge amounts of electrolytes into your hydration/feeding regimen while riding. I don't use Gatorade, PowerAid or other pre-made sport drinks because I feel they have too much electrolyte. At least for me they do.
Heck, I drink straight water out my hydration pack never thought of adding electrolytes. I have the powder packets that you add to water. Iím going to start adding them. I do eat Ritz peanut butter crackers at minute 90-120 that are salty so I guess that helps. When I used Gatorade I dilute it 50/50 with water. To prevent cramps why you cramp I donít know but I learned the hard way. I have had straight water in the hydration pack and a bottle of Gatorade in the bottle cage and figured it was being balanced out with the straight water.
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Old 07-05-20, 04:29 PM
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They’ve removed the water coolers on our golf course due to the virus......I walk the 18 holes so I put 3 of my cycling water bottles in my golf bag. I also take electrolyte capsules with the last two bottles. Those really help to keep my energy levels up. I’m not a big perspiration person but my clothes are soaked at the end of each round.

Yesterday I rode the bike for about 4 hours with temperatures pushing 90 the last hour along with high humidity all morning. I only used two bottles of sports drink. I need to drink more when but just don’t. I used to take a swig every 10-15 mins but have gotten out of the habit. I do a better job of drinking while climbing.
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Old 07-05-20, 04:32 PM
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103 right now. Going to night ride leave about 8pm .. drink a quart of Gatorade before I take off.
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Old 07-05-20, 04:37 PM
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Originally Posted by Hondo Gravel View Post
103 right now. Going to night ride leave about 8pm .. drink a quart of Gatorade before I take off.
Went for a short 19 mi ride in the 92F today. Going for a 15 mi or so ride with my wife after dark tonight on the bike trails. Will be her first night riding here in Ohio.
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Old 07-05-20, 04:43 PM
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Temps tend to be more mild here. 70's and 80's in the summer.

I have ridden in 100+ temperatures a couple of times. It isn't too bad as long as one keeps moving. Make sure one brings lots of water.

I hit upper 90's and low 100's for a 150 to 190 mile ride a few years ago. Whew, it was HOT midway through the ride, and I was drinking every drop of water I could get. Fortunately it cooled down somewhat even by late afternoon, and into early evening.
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