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100+ temperatures

Old 07-05-20, 05:00 PM
  #51  
big john
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Originally Posted by Hondo Gravel View Post
No but Iím sure I will. I know where the tanks aka ponds are were the pigs like to be that are near the road. They usually run away from you but if all confused could run into you and with those tusks it could turn out bad. Nasty crop destroying pests but if you shoot the 80-100 pounders they make great bar b q.. The big fat 300-500 pounders just stink. No natural enemies even coyotes wonít mess with a 500 pound angry mama sow.
My friend in East Texas tells me she is afraid if she falls off the bike the pigs will have her for lunch.
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Old 07-05-20, 05:05 PM
  #52  
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They can be aggressive but most of the ones I come across run away If not cornered.
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Old 07-05-20, 05:26 PM
  #53  
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Accuweather's forecast for Seattle for July shows a quite a few days around 80. Mostly 70's.

Guess with San Diego (Coronado) and Santa Cruz in my homeowning past, I'm just a left coaster.

I could not be a cyclist in southern summer heat and/or humidity.

But I couldn't live there either, so best for all.
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Old 07-05-20, 06:31 PM
  #54  
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Originally Posted by Hondo Gravel View Post
Yes, just a few hours ago I almost collided with a deer. I was on routes where I know the roads very well so I know where the deer tend to be. Not nearly as lonely as the route you cruised at night. Skunks and rattlesnakes is my biggest fear. It was great to get out of the hot sun and the old boring route is like new at night it feels like a completely different route. I havenít cycled at night very much so this is new and keeping the sport fresh.
I came across one rattler sunning himself on the shoulder in the early morning sunlight. I just swung out into the empty highway and gave him the shoulder. Big fat dude. One snake avoidance tactic I did use, when stopping to take a leak at night, was to just stick to the middle of the blacktop. I could see/hear a car from a mile away, so that wasn't a concern.

The locals told me they'd be most concerned about feral dogs, but TBH the locals were home in bed at 2am, not on the road to Sonora.
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Old 07-05-20, 06:46 PM
  #55  
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The poor dog that chases me just wants to run. The poor thing is half blind and slow. I stopped and let it catch me and the dog was smirking and all happy. Trotted back home all content...
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Old 07-05-20, 09:07 PM
  #56  
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Originally Posted by big john View Post
My friend in East Texas tells me she is afraid if she falls off the bike the pigs will have her for lunch.
True. We have a serious problem with feral hogs in Texas. I haven't hunted in years but I'd consider it for the feral hog problem. They're a menace to the entire ecosystem, not to mention dangerous to hikers or people who work outdoors.
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Old 07-05-20, 10:45 PM
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The state will give ranchers money to hire helicopters with shooters in them to shoot feral hogs. Sometimes I can here a helicopter then gun fire shooting hogs. When My family had a large ranch I hunted hogs all the time. We even had hog traps. We would also let people come over a hunt as many hogs as they wanted for free. Just to get rid of them. Like canklecat said they tear stuff up. They will ruin your whole yard and will even eat every seed in a farmer’s field right after it has been planted. Urban legend has it in S Texas this farmer lost his hog farm so he just let his 500 hogs loose and that started a boom in the feral hog population. No natural predators and they are a tough animal and smart.
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Old 07-07-20, 08:17 AM
  #58  
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Wunderground's Map said 112-116įF along my ride home yesterday afternoon. But there are plenty of places to stop and get a cold drink if I need it.
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Old 07-07-20, 09:23 AM
  #59  
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Here's how the pros train for the heat: https://trainright.com/badwater-lessons-preparation/
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Old 07-07-20, 09:40 AM
  #60  
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Thanks for the link. About the only one I've tried is running the heater in the summer. That wasn't to acclimate my body.

At the time my vehicle's radiator was clogged by the water here. So I delivered pizza in the summer running the heater. Believe it or not it kept the engine from popping a cork. Until I saved enough in tips to have the radiator rodded.

Nowadays my strategy is to pay attention to the weather predictions and the messages my body is telling me. Slow down when you have to. Ride faster at other times. Try to enjoy the ride fast or slow.
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Old 07-07-20, 10:32 AM
  #61  
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Only issue for the badwater link is that it is for runners that can't go fast enough for the evaporative cooling effect to exceed the amount of heat they are producing. Cycling you can do that. Anytime I'm sweating and over 16 mph in high 90's to triple digits, heat isn't an issue. Slow down and/or stop sweating, then it's time to be alert for heat exhaustion.

Certainly everything in that article is as anecdotal as my statements.
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Old 07-07-20, 10:58 AM
  #62  
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Is there a hydration pack that anyone recommends? I am thinking about getting one if it holds more H20. Thanks.
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Old 07-07-20, 12:12 PM
  #63  
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Originally Posted by big john View Post
I agree with most of your post with a couple of exceptions. First, I think hyponatremia is extremely rare with cyclists. I've heard of it, once with a friend who was part way through RAAM and had to be hospitalized and another time with a guy who was doing a 150 mile climbing ride on a hot day and he wasn't eating. I think if a cyclist is eating or at least taking electrolytes the risk is minimal. I know people have died from it during marathons, but these are people who spend 6+ hours running with nothing but water.
The other thing is the "drink only when thirsty" idea. This may work for some but certainly not everyone every time. When I do a hot climbing ride I cannot keep up with the fluid loss and have to start forcing water early in the ride. I typically come home from a hot ride (6 hours, more or less) 5 or 6 pounds lighter. I tried to ration water once, still drank a bunch, and was 11 pounds lighter after the ride. To me, thirst doesn't enter it and I must make a conscious effort to drink.
The adage still applies: "eat before you're hungry and drink before you're thirsty". That's because it takes a while for nutrients and moisture to get into the muscles or other places they're needed. A lot times, by the time you feel thirsty it's too late as your body fluid level is quite low and your electrolyte balance is out of kilter. The risk increases if in order to try and restore your electrolyte balance, which plain water won't do, you drink copious quantities of water which can cause hyponatremia.

If you add salt to your water you MUST add potassium too because without the potassium the salt is worse than nothing. I use half 'N' Half available in the baking section of most grocery stores. I add it to the water only when I need it.

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Old 07-07-20, 12:33 PM
  #64  
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Originally Posted by Iride01 View Post
Only issue for the badwater link is that it is for runners that can't go fast enough for the evaporative cooling effect to exceed the amount of heat they are producing. Cycling you can do that. Anytime I'm sweating and over 16 mph in high 90's to triple digits, heat isn't an issue. Slow down and/or stop sweating, then it's time to be alert for heat exhaustion.

Certainly everything in that article is as anecdotal as my statements.
The article is written by an ultrarunner who coaches ultrarunners who run the Badwater. True, it's not a double-blind RCT. It's a report on what has worked well and what has not worked so well for individual runners he has coached. I thought the what worked for heat training section fairly instructive. It can be windy in Death Valley. A few years ago the Furnace Creek 508 had crosswinds estimated at 60 mph. Most riders rode on anyway. Heat training works, and not only for hot weather. It improves performance in all temperatures.

I recall doing a pass climb in 100+ with a tailwind, the sweat from my nose dripping directly down onto my top tube. Luckily the top of the pass was only 85, which was still quite warm. That was Cayuse Pass, RAMROD, don't remember the year, but that was the year when I vowed I would work a lot harder on hydration in the first 3 hours of the ride.
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Old 07-07-20, 02:40 PM
  #65  
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Originally Posted by Iride01 View Post
Only issue for the badwater link is that it is for runners that can't go fast enough for the evaporative cooling effect to exceed the amount of heat they are producing. Cycling you can do that. Anytime I'm sweating and over 16 mph in high 90's to triple digits, heat isn't an issue. Slow down and/or stop sweating, then it's time to be alert for heat exhaustion.
True up to a point. I ran into problems this past weekend, temps only in the low 90s, but bright, sunny, and a 10 mph tailwind. There were just enough hills on that route that I spent 2/3 of that stretch with effectively no wind. Perhaps in another month or two I'll be able to tolerate that combination of heat and humidity, but it was dicey without any cooling this early in the summer.

Originally Posted by Miele Man View Post
If you add salt to your water you MUST add potassium too because without the potassium the salt is worse than nothing. I use half 'N' Half available in the baking section of most grocery stores. I add it to the water only when I need it.
Depends on the individual; I typically don't need extra potassium. My sweat glands seem to eject every sodium ion that comes along and hang onto the potassium, as my annual blood work shows. Exceptions may be very long days (300k plus) in 80-100 degrees, or after a week or so of long-ish (4 hours plus) rides in hot weather. Just give me a baked potato and a shaker of regular table salt, please!
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Old 07-07-20, 03:08 PM
  #66  
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Originally Posted by volosong View Post
An aborted self-supported century ride is one of the reasons that I'm spending my retirement years in North Idaho. A few years before I retired, I planned out a nice century ride from my home in Palmdale, (the high desert north of Los Angeles), to a distant mountain town, Tehachapi. Perpendicular to the wind, so that wouldn't be a problem. Flat across the Antelope Valley, then a moderate, but relentless climb to Tehachapi. Stop for lunch in town, then down the hill and across the valley home. Easy. Or so I thought.

Started out in the morning, made good time across the valley and my first stop outside Rosamond, about 22 miles into the ride. It was a nice, sunny day. But I don't remember it being particularly warm or hot. The little corner market had closed so I rested in the shadow of the nearby wine tasting room. I noticed pretty quickly that beads of sweat broke out all over my arms. "Oh, wow!", I thought. A real world example to use in my "Weather and Climate" class that I taught at the local community college. About how wind evaporates water and as long as I was moving, I was creating my own wind which evaporated the sweat off my arms. "Cool."

I noticed my water was awfully warm too. Almost like drinking watered-down tea. There is nothing more refreshing than ice cold water and noting more disgusting that warm/hot water. Anyway, after eating my little snack, I headed off. After a few more flatish miles, I started climbing through the windmill farm. Not a particularly steep climb, just continuous. As I continued to climb, I started feeling terrible. More and more as I continued climbing.

"Uh oh!", I thought. "Something's not right." "I better turn around and head home, I'm feeling pretty bad." I ended up taking a slightly different route home, one with a lot more little convenience stores along the way. The water in my insulated bottles was so hot that I couldn't drink it. I stopped at every store on the way and purchased something cold to drink. The colder the better.

Along the way, a mail delivery truck came from the opposite direction. The mail lady slowed as she came up to me and asked if I wanted something to drink. I must have looked awful, to have her coming toward me and stopping to offer cold water. She said she carries a cooler of water with her when making her rounds.

Finally limped home and checked the thermometer. It read 104ļ F. With the low desert humidity, it didn't feel all that hot. But I guess under the cloudless summer sky and pushing a bicycle, it was too much. I spent the rest of the day recovering and re-hydrating. It was also the day I decided that "No more!" I'm going to retire somewhere it doesn't get so hot.

Nixed southern Idaho because it gets triple digits in the summer. Not so up north. I get a kick when people start complaining about how hot it is; and it is only in the high 80s. If they only knew. I do not ride in triple digits anymore. I'm sure that on that day, I was suffering from some form of heat stroke or heat exhaustion. Could have put myself in a coma. I was lucky that day. (And foolish me. I didn't check the weather forecast that day.)

What part of northern Idaho did you move to?
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Old 07-07-20, 04:04 PM
  #67  
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Originally Posted by Carbonfiberboy View Post

I recall doing a pass climb in 100+ with a tailwind, the sweat from my nose dripping directly down onto my top tube. Luckily the top of the pass was only 85, which was still quite warm. That was Cayuse Pass, RAMROD, don't remember the year, but that was the year when I vowed I would work a lot harder on hydration in the first 3 hours of the ride.
I remember climbing back into the valley I live in on my white Trek. It was about 115 out and my sweat was dripping on the top tube and I noticed it was red. Turns out I had a nosebleed and it stood out against the white frame.
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Old 07-07-20, 04:09 PM
  #68  
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Originally Posted by Carbonfiberboy View Post
. A few years ago the Furnace Creek 508 had crosswinds estimated at 60 mph. Most riders rode on anyway. Heat training works, and not only for hot weather. It improves performance in all temperatures..
I think that was the year Biker395 did the race. I think less than half the riders finished. He got blown off the road once into the sand. He put his bike down once and the wind picked it up and it flew a few yards away.
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Old 07-07-20, 04:25 PM
  #69  
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Originally Posted by big john View Post
I think that was the year Biker395 did the race. I think less than half the riders finished. He got blown off the road once into the sand. He put his bike down once and the wind picked it up and it flew a few yards away.
Homeyba, who used to post here, rode it that year, too. He posted a photo of a bike maybe 40' away, almost invisible in the blowing sand. The sand must have been just hell.
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Old 07-07-20, 04:54 PM
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Originally Posted by Carbonfiberboy View Post
Homeyba, who used to post here, rode it that year, too. He posted a photo of a bike maybe 40' away, almost invisible in the blowing sand. The sand must have been just hell.
Vic said there were scorpions blowing across the road.
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Old 07-07-20, 09:44 PM
  #71  
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Originally Posted by saddlesniffer View Post
What part of northern Idaho did you move to?
A small town a few miles away from Coeur d'Alene.
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Old 07-08-20, 02:45 AM
  #72  
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I went riding in El Cajon near San Diego a couple of years ago . It was summer and 105 in the shade . I stopped at a Starbucks and had tropical iced tea with no sweetener. It is the only time I ever took advantage of my free refill. The straight water just wasn’t quenching my thirst. I have since switched to Nuun and that helps a lot. The mineral supplements are great for us older folks and probably younger folks too.
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Old 07-08-20, 03:43 AM
  #73  
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Several years back, on the second century ride I'd ever done (so still working out pacing, hydration, etc) the temperature got deep into the 90s with high humidity. At about the 80 mile mark, I would have been wise to make the call of shame and get a ride to the finish, but I didn't. I finished the ride, but I know that I never want to feel like that again. I'm much more conscious these days about extended time in what is, for me, excessive heat and humidity.
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Old 07-08-20, 12:47 PM
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I don't care for cold drink while riding in hot temps. My bottles are uninsulated and just are whatever temp they are. I've always felt that cold water doesn't get absorbed as fast in your gut. I know it's a great way to cool down quick if you are in trouble heat wise. But I've so far been able to control how hot my body gets when working or exercising outside by other things.

Maybe it comes from learning to drink warm beer when a teenager after stacking hay bales during the summer. Never were enough ice machines nearby back then to fill a cooler with.
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Old 07-08-20, 04:48 PM
  #75  
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Hauling and stacking hay will make a man out of you or kill you Lifted many a bale when we were in that business but I was much younger. You will learn to hydrate and drink warm water... There were no Yeti ice chests and like you said getting ice was impossible in places.
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